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Thinking of getting a MIG welder

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post

    Nice car!!!
    Thanks. should have been search google images " Like this. -> https://www.pro-touring.com/threads/...for-rain/page2 JR

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Hmmmm? I didnt see an answer to your Question. I missed it if it was there.

    I get it, you have your mind made up to some extent, right? Why ask the question dumb without any notion.

    And that Sir: is proper research.

    I know, I flouded the post just like now :0

    Only advice I could every give is go 220vac (common) or higher and always use gas.

    I have welded the drip rails of my 62 nova tight! Google jrouche 62 nova drip rails. (It seems we dont need to save stuff.).

    Anyway.

    I like what you are doing. Id stay with the same manufacture and get some larger gas bottles JR


    Nice car!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    [QUOTE=RB211;n1952248Anyone have one of these units? Cyclone 140E
    [/QUOTE]

    Hmmmm? I didnt see an answer to your Question. I missed it if it was there.

    I get it, you have your mind made up to some extent, right? Why ask the question dumb without any notion.

    And that Sir: is proper research.

    I know, I flouded the post just like now :0

    Only advice I could every give is go 220vac (common) or higher and always use gas.

    I have welded the drip rails of my 62 nova tight! Google jrouche 62 nova drip rails. (It seems we dont need to save stuff.).

    Anyway.

    I like what you are doing. Id stay with the same manufacture and get some larger gas bottles JR



    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post

    The machine featured in the original post is like mine, in that it has the advantage of being portable with the 120V input. That was my primary reason with going with my SP100. If you don't always need that feature, or have ready access to the heavier supply power wherever you're going to be working, then it never hurts to have the extra capacity. Best of both worlds with the dual voltage. If you're going to go with the bigger machine then I suppose the next question would be why stop there. Is there anything with even larger capacity available that still stays close to budget? I'm not an expert with the Everlast brand, but they appear to have a good product line, with lots of good choices. Can all your needs be combined into one power supply?
    Heck yeah! One of these machines will do Stick, TIG and MIG......at a price.
    https://www.esabna.com/us/en/product...v-cc/index.cfm
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 07-22-2021, 07:48 PM. Reason: Forgot the ESAB link

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post

    The machine featured in the original post is like mine, in that it has the advantage of being portable with the 120V input. That was my primary reason with going with my SP100. If you don't always need that feature, or have ready access to the heavier supply power wherever you're going to be working, then it never hurts to have the extra capacity. Best of both worlds with the dual voltage. If you're going to go with the bigger machine then I suppose the next question would be why stop there. Is there anything with even larger capacity available that still stays close to budget? I'm not an expert with the Everlast brand, but they appear to have a good product line, with lots of good choices. Can all your needs be combined into one power supply?
    Price is a concern, as my funds are going towards real estate investments. The 399$ 140 amp unit is really fitting the bill quite well. I wish my TIG had a few more bells and whistles like pre-flow, pulse, and AC. Sure, a $2,000 multi process rig would be awesome, that ain’t happening.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    I’m more after the dual voltage feature, but you’re right, TIG is good for that.
    The machine featured in the original post is like mine, in that it has the advantage of being portable with the 120V input. That was my primary reason with going with my SP100. If you don't always need that feature, or have ready access to the heavier supply power wherever you're going to be working, then it never hurts to have the extra capacity. Best of both worlds with the dual voltage. If you're going to go with the bigger machine then I suppose the next question would be why stop there. Is there anything with even larger capacity available that still stays close to budget? I'm not an expert with the Everlast brand, but they appear to have a good product line, with lots of good choices. Can all your needs be combined into one power supply?

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Huh? Back when I bought my first TiG, it was specifically to build a motorcycle frame
    so as not burn through the tubing with MiG. But different folks use different tools I guess.

    -Doozer
    I’m more after the dual voltage feature, but you’re right, TIG is good for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    I’m starting to wonder if I should get the 200amp 120/240v of that Everlast welder for 200ish more, just in case I want to weld up a Go Kart frame or something without resorting to TIG.
    Huh? Back when I bought my first TiG, it was specifically to build a motorcycle frame
    so as not burn through the tubing with MiG. But different folks use different tools I guess.

    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    RB211: My Hobart 170 runs on 240V and works great for what I do. One of the pluses of Mig is smooth welds with no undercut. As you know , also good for thin stuff. The only thing I would do if replacing my Hobart is to consider one of the Miller's. Take a look at the duty cycle of whatever you are buying. Good luck.
    Sarge41

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  • RB211
    replied
    I’m starting to wonder if I should get the 200amp 120/240v of that Everlast welder for 200ish more, just in case I want to weld up a Go Kart frame or something without resorting to TIG.

    Leave a comment:


  • eKretz
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    I always hear about the "just do two passes" routine, and it really is not that simple.

    The machine has to be a minimum size to get away with that, or you will have to preheat the dickens out of the parts. Having used a "90A" machine (not mine), I do not think there is any way to get it to do 1/4" plate unless you preheat, and maybe not then.

    That size just does not have the power to produce a puddle and move it along at that thickness before it duty cycles off. It will "almost" produce a puddle the first try, then cycles off well before getting there after that. Seems as if it would need to have a pretty hot pre-heat to let it do two plates of 1/4". If you just need to stick a small block of 1/4" down, it probably will do that cold.

    I am not sure of the minimum, I know 220A will do it easily MIG, and so will 175A with stick. Maybe 140 will do it MIG, but it seems to be pushing the "1 mil per amp" rule pretty hard.
    Yeah, agreed. My 135 amp Miller might weld ¼" at the max, but that would be with pre-machined chamfers, dual-shield and probably lots of preheat.

    I'd either stick to ⅛" max for that class MIG and use stick for the heavier stuff or buy a more capable MIG machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Can't remember the last time I used something with fixed taps, or less than 035 wire.
    I think the 120-V MIG's are ideal for auto work because it tends to be all short beads, stop-start welding.
    Did my buddy's entire truck cab with one (Hobart 140) no issues at all.
    You never actually run into the duty cycle except with the very cheapest machines.
    Everlast isn't one of those, their quality is good for the price and they aren't exactly an unknown startup any more.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Yes... the "cycling off" was duty cycle limited shutoff, based on temperature. It would have to cool down before it would do any welding.

    As it heats up, resistance of the wire increases, so the current probably decreases somewhat. That clearly is not a change in a helpful direction. the reduction in amps also has some increase of dissipation per amp due to resistance. That is calculable, but I don't feel like deriving it right now, so I am not sure if it is a "win" or a "loss" as far as duty cycle.

    The one I used was remarkably stupidly made. It was a Lincoln. When it duty cycled off, THE FAN WAS ALSO TURNED OFF!

    Talk about stupid.... the fan would cool it down so that it would not be off so long. But it got shut off by the temp sensor.

    The other hidden gotcha in those units is that the overtemp sensor will turn back on way above room temperature. So, the next time it starts, it has a lot less heating before it shuts off again.

    If it went 2 minutes the first time, it may go 45 seconds the second and all future tries, until you let it cool down all the way. So you get one shot at it, with a long cool-down before you can give it another meaningful try.

    I do not know what thermal shutoff type is used. Those shutoffs differ in how many degrees they must cool before they will re-close. That is often 20 to 40 C. But, since the shutoff is likely up near 100C, that cool-down time does not get you back to square one on heating, the unit is pre-heated still, and will run a much shorter time.

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  • chipmaker4130
    replied
    The problem is not entirely 'amps'. As you mention, Jerry, the duty cycle on these 120V machines is extremely short and if for some reason you beat that, the supply breaker will go next. People continue to say 'that's all I need' and then eventually try to run a 3' bead on a tank, etc. Additionally, these mini-welders usually 'fade' as the internals warm up so whatever performance you start with will not be sustained with prolonged use at any given time.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    I always hear about the "just do two passes" routine, and it really is not that simple.

    The machine has to be a minimum size to get away with that, or you will have to preheat the dickens out of the parts. Having used a "90A" machine (not mine), I do not think there is any way to get it to do 1/4" plate unless you preheat, and maybe not then.

    That size just does not have the power to produce a puddle and move it along at that thickness before it duty cycles off. It will "almost" produce a puddle the first try, then cycles off well before getting there after that. Seems as if it would need to have a pretty hot pre-heat to let it do two plates of 1/4". If you just need to stick a small block of 1/4" down, it probably will do that cold.

    I am not sure of the minimum, I know 220A will do it easily MIG, and so will 175A with stick. Maybe 140 will do it MIG, but it seems to be pushing the "1 mil per amp" rule pretty hard.

    Leave a comment:

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