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OFF TOPIC In the year 2021,why am I still cleaning my dryer vent? zager and evans

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
    Well unless you live in an apartment a "close line" in the back yard removes all that concern. :-) Of course it helps to live in NM or AZ . :-)
    ...lew...
    Believe it or not, a clothes line works just as good way up north here. Even with snow up to your rear.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
      Well unless you live in an apartment a "close line" in the back yard removes all that concern. :-) Of course it helps to live in NM or AZ . :-)
      ...lew...
      That takes me back to the old days when mom had to hang our clothes out on a clothes line, even in winter (freeze dry), because that's what we had back when I was a kid. They won't dry in the rain though, natch, so mom did use a clothes horse in the house.

      .
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Arcane View Post

        That takes me back to the old days when mom had to hang our clothes out on a clothes line, even in winter (freeze dry), because that's what we had back when I was a kid. They won't dry in the rain though, natch, so mom did use a clothes horse in the house.

        .
        Yup, mine had a couple of lines in the basement for rainy days. Or if the snow was too deep.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #34
          If you want your dryer to not work so hard, and to not have so much fluff come off the clothes, your best move is to get a front-loading washer.

          When we did that, the dryer run time was cut to about half, and the amount of fluff that collected dropped to less than half what it had been.

          Top loaders beat the crap out of your clothes, which is why there is all that fluff... it is clothing material that has been loosened and broken by the washer. You paid for that material, and you are washing it away. Seems pretty silly to do that.

          Front loaders do not beat the clothes so much, and they get clothes cleaner using less water and soap. They remove more water from the load, so the dryer does not have to run so long.

          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

          Me thinks it's way better to have higher volume lower heat going through the exhaust vent --- I believe if you do NOT clean your filter every time then you start to build up higher heat due to lower exchange volume --- this does a series of bad things, higher heat produces more change of ignition and also relies on limit switches should the heat get too high - not good, also - lower exhaust volume builds up more lint in the corrugated exhaust outlet, like you say the lint filter does not catch all so ignition may just be a matter of time IF bad practices are being used...

          total agreement with "most" everyone ----------- Why in the world would you not clean your lint filter every time you use the dryer? it's how the machines designed to be used and it's inefficient AND unsafe not too....
          Agree that the open filter is better. NO filter would be best, if the stuff would not accumulate in the pipe.

          The filter does tend to pick up more "fines" when it is coated with fluff. Fluff is a better filter than the "window screen" material of the "filter".

          I still clean it every time. It's right there behind the door, easy to do. And the dryer runs a shorter cycle if the air can get through easily. That means it's cheaper per load, something that should appeal to "hobbyists who are cheaper than the day is long".

          A better filter would reduce the fluff that gets through. It would also slow down the air, and require a more powerful fan. There is a trade-off in there somewhere.

          Like I said, I clean the filter every time.

          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #35
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post
            The dryer/washer combined unit in the Korea hotel we stay at, washes the lint away with water down the drain. There is NO lint filter.
            Yeah, right. We have one made by Hoover, that started to give a very poor drying performance, when it was about 3 years old. Everything I read about it on line said that it blew the lint out via a condenser and the drain pump. Eventually (wrongly) I decided that the heater element in the dryer duct needed replacement. I dismantled the ducting to access the element, and, surprise surprise the duct was half blocked with lint, so was the fan, and the (inaccessible) duct down to the condenser. Half an hour fishing with a piece of bent wire fetched out a handful of soggy lint. Cleaned out the duct and fan, fitted the new element (might as well, I'd bought one anyway) and put it back together. Works just fine now, but don't believe the 'experts' when they tell you that washer/dryers don't need a lint trap.
            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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            • #36
              Originally posted by J Tiers;n1952971

              ................. And the dryer runs a shorter cycle if the air can get through easily. That means it's cheaper per load, something that should appeal to [B
              "hobbyists who are cheaper than the day is long".[/B]

              .........................
              Ha Ha Ha
              Hey, we resemble that remark.LOL
              I believe the more acceptable term would be, frugal or efficient, so as not to cause undue emotional scaring and the need for counseling. We may be cheap but we're a sensitive lot as well, especially so when confronted with undeniable personal character traits.
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #37
                Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                Perhaps you could use a clothesline instead?
                Yes,but have you tried to buy a clothes prop lately? Not only dont they have them,but they dont even know what they are. Edwin Dirnbeck

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                • #38
                  ...."Pick you son, pick your daughter too.....from the bottom of a long glass tube....wo, oh, wo..."
                  No, I didn't look up the lyrics on line. Heard them on AM radio, can't remember which year...late 1960s I think.
                  S E Michigan

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post

                    Yes,but have you tried to buy a clothes prop lately? Not only dont they have them,but they dont even know what they are. Edwin Dirnbeck
                    Why would you buy one? A length of 2x1 planed timber with a vee notch in one end.

                    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                    • #40
                      Dryer's beat the clothes while tumbling in warm air. Lint is just a by product. I clean screens each load. Every 6 months I have a look at the dryer vent piping to be sure it is clear. There should be a good volume of air flow at the exit. Elbows and long upward runs, especially the spiral pipe types, tend to allow lint to build up, as do the outdoor exit fixtures.
                      Its just maintenance, like cleaning chips out of lathe, drill press, or mill.
                      S E Michigan

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                      • #41
                        Edwin, haven't they sent you your new NS-5 to take care of all the little chores?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                          Yup, mine had a couple of lines in the basement for rainy days. Or if the snow was too deep.
                          my grandma had clothes lines in her attic for that
                          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                          Lewis Grizzard

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post

                            Yes,but have you tried to buy a clothes prop lately? Not only dont they have them,but they dont even know what they are. Edwin Dirnbeck
                            I just use an old broom handle with a notch in one end. BTW there actually IS a (over priced) clothes line prop on Amazon but I try to avoid them.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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