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gluing lexan

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  • gluing lexan

    I have not looked this up yet- just wondering what I can use to glue lexan to aluminum. I'm replacing a shattered trailer window. This must be done asap, so since the window was going to be 3 weeks away, I opted to use lexan and just get 'er done. I'd like to use automotive goop, but I don't know if the solvent in it will craze the lexan. The same question could be asked for any kind of glue I might use. I'm considering flexible epoxy as well, marine epoxy, and even dap. I'd like it to be black, as that will match what's there already, and will hide the mess I'm going to have after removing all the broken glass. We don't know if the window was broken by a bugler or the heat of those tortuous days got to it. At any rate the lexan should make it hard for a burgler to gain entrance.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    There is a special silicone for this purpose because the lexan expands and contracts way more than glass. It also requires a special primer and that makes it very expensive for one window.

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    • #3
      " We don't know if the window was broken by a bugler "

      Sorry - but I can't resist - the bugler must have been blowing pretty hard!

      Ian.

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      • #4
        Maybe do a test with methylacrylate, rubberized superglue (aka Loctite Black Max or cheaper alternative) or Hysol 20HP. Hysol might be hard to get in small cheap quantities though.
        Last edited by repoman; 07-23-2021, 08:57 AM.

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        • #5
          " We don't know if the window was broken by a bugler "

          Sorry - but I can't resist - the bugler must have been blowing pretty hard!

          He was a friend of Ella Fitzgerald

          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            The cheap way would be to try Goop. Typical silicone won't stick well to polycarbonate.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              3M marine adhesive/sealant 5200, perhaps.
              Location: North Central Texas

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              • #8
                The more I search, the more confused I become. I would have used 3M 5200, but 3M specifically says don't use 5200 with lexan. Silicone is the choice, and not the choice at the same time. Lexan doesn't like solvents, so goop may be out- along with many other potential adhesives. When I cleaned up the aluminum piece that the lexan will be attached to, what came out appeared to be rubber, butyl rubber I believe. It was very well bonded to the aluminum, and to the glass. It might work well with lexan too, but I can't find it. I also could not find flexible epoxy, or I might have had this laid up by now. That is still seeming to be my best bet. I do have a couple more places to look, so I'm going there now.
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #9
                  Use screws.

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                  • #10
                    For best results scuff the area to be bonded.. Window bonds often fail due to insufficient sealant thickness to allow for thermal expansion. GE produces Lexan polycarbonate and also a comprehensive line of silicone adhesive sealants.
                    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                    Index "Super 55" mill
                    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                    24" State disc sander

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                    • #11
                      I have some kind of hybrid thing I'm going to try- says it will stick to aluminum and some plastics. There is a gap where it can fill so the flexibility can accommodate some differential expansion. After a few days of curing I'll add some screws. I have a temporary piece in place of the window for now, so at least the trailer is closed off.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        If using screws. make sure the hole is a good deal bigger than the screw. The polycarbonate will crack if it can't expand and contract, and its rate of thermal expansion is several times that of anything it's usually attached to. And don't countersink the screws, either. Use round or cheese head screws.

                        In other words, avoid using screws if at all possible.

                        Try to arrange matters so that the sealant is not put under shear stress from the differential thermal expansion, but rather to compression and stretch, i.e., rely on the generous bead of sealant around the edge of the polycarbonate to do the hard yards, not the thin layer between the outer face of the polycarbonate and the inner face of the channel or whatever that its in.

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                        • #13
                          Do you have Safelite, auto windshield repair outlets, in Canada? I'd check with them, or some other such shop, and see what they recommend. They could probably provide you with a tube of suitable stuff.
                          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                          • #14
                            What you really need is a piece of transparent aluminium!
                            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darryl View Post
                              I have not looked this up yet- just wondering what I can use to glue lexan to aluminum. I'm replacing a shattered trailer window. This must be done asap, so since the window was going to be 3 weeks away,
                              Did you try a glass shop? Window is X by Y, rounded corners perhaps, maybe 1/8 or 3/16 thick, a glass shop could have that cut and finished in around 20 minutes. Re-install using the existing trim.

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