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Gentlemen Farmers!!!!!

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  • Gentlemen Farmers!!!!!

    A man up the road from me came this morning to borrow a heavy duty hydraulic jack. I asked him what he needed to jack up. He said his excavator. I asked how big it was. He said 3.5 ton. I asked why he needed to jack it up. He said he had a track jump the sprocket. I asked if the excavator ran. He said yes. I told him lets go see your excavator. I grabbed my grease gun and a couple of blocks of wood and off we went. Those of you that have worked on heavy equipment know what is coming!!!!!

    When I jumped in the excavator and swung the arm perpendicular to the tracked, pushed down on the ground and raised the track off the ground he literally slapped his forehead.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    Mein gott!

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    • #3
      Achtung Baby!

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      • #4
        Hydraulics can work both ways Its a lesson he won't forget.
        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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        • #5
          I ran a track hoe and a trencher also maintained them both,

          always had to pull off little stunts in getting the track hoe out of certain situations that were also kinda sketchy --- crossing out of a trench you dug out and having to use the shovel to support the machine as your crossing intersections that you could not help but box yourself in, same thing with the trencher,,,

          the arss end was so heavy it would collapse a trench you have to cross and that was a pita due to having to hand dig it back out - most always in the hot sun, so the method would be to baby the front end over the trench, then the machine was straddling the trench - then plant the stinger on the ground and almost pick up the arss end of the machine with it, then because it was 4 wheel drive you still had front wheel drive - the trick was to get the stinger teeth rotating in reverse to match the forward motion that you were engaging at the same time with the drive system, cross the arss end over the trench, set er back down on the other side and not have to dig... worked 9 times out or 10 but every once in awhile still have a cave in lol

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          • #6
            When I had a couple of track loaders the tracks needed to be kept adjusted or they would jump off.
            the grease fittings to push the ram cylinder out needed an air grease gun. Hand pumping would not move
            the tracks. Hope your friend does not need pins and bushings. Ron

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            • #7
              One of the "miracle fixes" I did on the Kubota track hoe was to do with the main frame pivoting bearing ------- extremely expensive as it's also part of the ring gear that rotates the machine - so expensive labor and parts wise that the old machine was really not worth it,,, the great thing is that you had an access port for the ball bearings, so I took out a bearing and measured it, I then took a "stab" at what size I would need to take up all the slop, IIRC they were 17mm balls i ordered --- just a handful at first to see if I was close in my guess,
              I then extracted an old ball and replaced with a new one every 120 degree's the machine was back to feeling tight and would rotate 360 degree's without binding -------- I then re-ordered all the balls it would take to do the entire replacement --- there were little nylon cups between the balls that I just reused --- after replacing all the balls it had a few little tight spots --- I knew this was incredibly critical because too much tension could snap the ring gear, kept the machine for about a week and slowly broke it in --- think I charged my bro 700 bucks and he was very happy - that machine is still going today after 20 more years of service....

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              • #8
                Haha, that's hilarious. I have had the same thing with guys when changing tractor tires. Don't need a jack guys, just use the loader bucket or the hoe!

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                • #9
                  Friend of mine broke the front axle on his JCB backhoe/loader. While he was waiting for the welding shop to repair it, he still kept it working digging trenches on the farm, front end supported on the front bucket, dig as normal at the back, then push it along a few feet with the backhoe before digging more trench.
                  'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                  • #10
                    All goes to show just how innovative a good cat skinner is! I hired a fellow with a Case 450 with a hoe on the back to dig a storm drain for me. It was about 7 feet down by the road and all of it was through clay. At one point the machine was beside the trench and started to slip into the hole. Faster than I realized what was happening he swung the hoe around to the other side of the trench and caught the machine and pushed himself back out. It broke my sidewalk but it was worth it just for the show.

                    I spent a summer working on a coal exploration site. They drilled a lot of test holes so the procedure was to use a cat to level the drill site and dig a hole for the drilling mud. The mud slurry would be left in the hole to skim over but it sealed itself so you had a mud hole waiting for somebody to step on it. They would stay wet for several years. One day a Cat went into the hole and the mud came up over the tracks. The tracks just spun and couldn't move the machine. The operator dug down through the mud and got the line from the winch out but the only thing to pull on was at an angle and he broke the cable. I was getting quite curious about how he was going to get it out. In this case, he called for another cat and they dug a hole beside the first one and drained the mud into it. I asked him what he would have done if there was no other cat available and his response was that while it wouldn't have been any fun, he would have used his chain saw to cut down trees to get enough logs to chain to the tracks and crawl out on a cordwood roadbed.

                    Brian

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                    • #11
                      You know, if you put a 6"X6" wood block under the mast of a fork lift
                      and tilt the mast forwards, it will pick the front wheels off the ground.

                      -Doozer
                      DZER

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                      • #12
                        One time at an old maintenance job of mine, they were putting a few feet of clay cap over the landfill.
                        One of the Cats got stuck because it had rained hard recently. His buddy went to pull him out and got stuck too.
                        This was really a surprise because they both had the wide LGP pads.
                        Both machines weighed around 60 tons, each.

                        Management was not too happy about this.
                        These were D8's and you lose a lot of money if they are just sitting around.
                        Finally gave up in disgust, the owners decided to wait 6 months.

                        Why?

                        Because 6 months later, the ground was frozen solid, 6 feet deep. With another 3 feet of snow on top.
                        So, just start up your Cat and drive it out in low gear, like normal.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                          One time at an old maintenance job of mine, they were putting a few feet of clay cap over the landfill.
                          One of the Cats got stuck because it had rained hard recently. His buddy went to pull him out and got stuck too.
                          This was really a surprise because they both had the wide LGP pads.
                          Both machines weighed around 60 tons, each.

                          Management was not too happy about this.
                          These were D8's and you lose a lot of money if they are just sitting around.
                          Finally gave up in disgust, the owners decided to wait 6 months.

                          Why?

                          Because 6 months later, the ground was frozen solid, 6 feet deep. With another 3 feet of snow on top.
                          So, just start up your Cat and drive it out in low gear, like normal.
                          Doesn't always work. i was on a site with a big crawler crane, weather was wet, site was muddy. It was long weekend, and the crane parked up in a foot or so of mud, well over the bottom of the tracks and the bottom rollers. Over the weekend came a big freeze, and when we got back, the ground was frozen solid around the crane tracks, and it couldn't break itself free. We tried building fires around the tracks, but that didn't work either. Had to wait 3 weeks before the weather warmed up a bit and the ground thawed enough to let it break free.
                          'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

                            Doesn't always work. i was on a site with a big crawler crane, weather was wet, site was muddy. It was long weekend, and the crane parked up in a foot or so of mud, well over the bottom of the tracks and the bottom rollers. Over the weekend came a big freeze, and when we got back, the ground was frozen solid around the crane tracks, and it couldn't break itself free. We tried building fires around the tracks, but that didn't work either. Had to wait 3 weeks before the weather warmed up a bit and the ground thawed enough to let it break free.
                            Yeah, I can kind of understand why. The crane crawlers at work don't really have a dedicated final drive like the cats do. Most often its a standard-size, off-the-shelf hydraulic motor. Most of the cranes (material handlers actually) spend most of their hydraulic energy on the boom and very little on the (underpowered) hydraulic motors.
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #15
                              This was way before hydraulic drives, it was all clutches and band brakes, with big operating levers. You are right though, the travel transmission on a crawler crane is just to haul itself around, so it isn't that powerful in 'propel' mode, whereas a Cat transmission is designed for much heavier loadings. A direct drive D8H in low gear (6 speed gearbox) really has got some guts.
                              'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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