Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Does Micro and a billionth mean the same thing?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Does Micro and a billionth mean the same thing?

    Both in the same number line right? The one is on the micro. .000,000

    And the other on the macro 100,000.. Same number.

    Anyway, back to the question. Why is our best measuring device called a Micrometer.

    Them pesky Brits got in here and messed our measuring system I tell you LOL,,,

    Yeah , we all have a micrometer. Thanks french,

    It means micro (small) meter( lenth).

    Oh crap, I forgot, wrong web site/ lol,,

    Ill let it cool;. see what happens. Then its gone. JR

  • #2
    I think billion has different meaning depending which side of the pond you are.
    Last edited by Noitoen; 07-25-2021, 06:05 AM.
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

    Comment


    • #3
      For the standard SI numeric prefixes…
      Micro is 1/1,000,000. (One million’th in the US)
      nano is 1/1,000,000,000 (One billion’th in the US)

      A microsecond is 1,000 nanoseconds long

      when the prefixes are used colloquially, such as micropayment or nanoparticle, they tend just to mean “small” in some undefined way

      Comment


      • #4
        Micro would be millionths. Move the decimal point 6 places.
        Nano would be billionth. Move the decimal point 9 places.

        Comment


        • #5
          In this context, "meter" means instrument for measurements, not length. I have a volt meter, which is NOT a volt length. Also, "micro" means "small" in this context. So, you have a device that can measure to small increments, or a micrometer.

          Comment


          • #6
            What's always annoyed me is the use of the term "mil" plastic tarp mfg.'s paint coating thickness etc. use the term mil to indicate material thickness. Why not just say thousandths

            1 mil = .001 Special terminology for specific industries ??

            JL..............

            Comment


            • #7
              Mil means thousand now un-fortunately it has turned out that it can mean EITHER 1000. or .001. While for the other units there are Deci and Deca Meg and Micro, Gig and Nano etc
              I guess you have to get which of Mil meanings from context . :-)
              ...lew... Anybody ave a good foundation in, I guess Latin ??? :-)

              Comment


              • #8
                Isn't "mili" = 1/1,000 , as in miligram, and "kilo"=1,000 as in kilogram?
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                  Mil means thousand now un-fortunately it has turned out that it can mean EITHER 1000. or .001. While for the other units there are Deci and Deca Meg and Micro, Gig and Nano etc
                  I guess you have to get which of Mil meanings from context . :-)
                  ...lew... Anybody ave a good foundation in, I guess Latin ??? :-)
                  Mille = latin for 1000
                  kilo = greek for 1000


                  And in US "M" seem to be often micro. And mega is "meg".
                  Like 1Mf capacitor and 1 meg(ohm) resistor
                  Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                    Mille = latin for 1000
                    kilo = greek for 1000


                    And in US "M" seem to be often micro. And mega is "meg".
                    Like 1Mf capacitor and 1 meg(ohm) resistor
                    1Mf would be a 1 millifarad capacitor. 1uF would be 1 microfarad capacitor....in modern notation.

                    Very old schematics from the early tube days used M to represent micro when giving a capacitor value and used MMF to represent picofarad. Believe it or not, they also often used M to represent Kilo in a resistor value also...
                    Last edited by polaraligned; 07-25-2021, 11:01 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A meter is 1000 millimeters so a micrometer (length) is 1000/1,000,000 = 0.001 millimeters. Some of the metric micrometers (tools) I've seen have vernier scales that permit reading to 0.001 millimeters.

                      So, the word "micrometer" interpreted as a length is about what the (vernier) "micrometer" tool can measure.

                      However, the derivation of the name is not a description of the lower limit of its measurement capability but rather a term for its ability to measure very small lengths, as this quote from Wikipedia indicates...

                      The word micrometer is a neoclassical coinage from Greek micros 'small', and metron 'measure'. The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary says that English got it from French and that its first known appearance in English writing was in 1670. Neither the metre nor the micrometre (µm) nor the micrometer (device) as we know them today existed at that time.
                      Regards, Marv

                      Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                      http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                      Location: LA, CA, USA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                        Mil means thousand now un-fortunately it has turned out that it can mean EITHER 1000. or .001. While for the other units there are Deci and Deca Meg and Micro, Gig and Nano etc
                        I guess you have to get which of Mil meanings from context . :-)
                        ...lew... Anybody ave a good foundation in, I guess Latin ??? :-)
                        One mil being the thousandth part, I think it works either way.
                        Yep, greek or latin. Can't remember which, dangit now I gotta look it up!
                        As for micro, that is the millionth part.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "Mil" is another one of those screwy, dual-valued non-units for which the inferial system is so noted.

                          Mil in the machine shop is slang for 0.001 inch. However, in the military world of artillery, a mil is 1/6400 of a circle. There are 2000*pi ~= 6284 milliradians in a circle so the military, in all its wisdom, "rounded" 6284 to 6400. (The reason for using radians to measure angles is that the arc length ~= lateral offset can then be calculated by multiplying the angle by the range.)

                          Mil, like sheet metal gauge numbers (and the rest of the inferial nonsense), should be confined to the garbage can of history.
                          Regards, Marv

                          Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
                          http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

                          Location: LA, CA, USA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post

                            Mille = latin for 1000
                            kilo = greek for 1000


                            And in US "M" seem to be often micro. And mega is "meg".
                            Like 1Mf capacitor and 1 meg(ohm) resistor
                            Capital M should denote Mega, lowercase m would be mili. At least half the population of people who use these prefixes screw it up.

                            My source: engineering school and 20 years of reading (modern) datasheets from component vendors. Does not reflect past practices per se
                            Last edited by psomero; 07-25-2021, 02:23 PM.
                            -paul

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We have circular mils which is a measurement of area equal to the area of a 0.001” dia circle.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X