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OT - Mental Heath

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I think the biggest tragedy is youth .
    Agreed. I also think the world is magnitudes tougher on them now. At a time when their sense of self (ego) is just forming and at its most fragile, everything they do or say is recorded and critiqued by the world. Then there's so much pressure so much earlier, to pick a career by 10 rather than 2nd year, get perfect grades or you're pooched, bullying at internet speed and so on.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-30-2021, 11:18 AM.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by ikdor View Post
    I'm sure there are different kinds of depression, but it seems that some are a chemical unbalance in the brain that just make it function differently. .
    There is the basic "down in the dumps" we all get and is a short term reaction to life kicking you in the nuts.

    Manic Depressive - This is one of the worst, I believe an imbalance in the brain chemistry (don't quote me on this). Rapid mode swings severe depression.

    Clinical Depression - This is what I have.😒 A reaction to a trigger, it can be food or medicine as an example, that induces severe depression, remove the trigger and you get back to normal. Stay off the trigger and your probably OK for good. .

    There are probably many more kinds. Most are out of your control or they control you

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Most of us get "work hardened" after all we are carbon lifeforms right? seems for the most part the more we make it through the tougher we get but that's not a guarantee,

    I think the biggest tragedy is youth and when they have no track record and nothing to fall back on and many take their own life from mere "hiccups" that would have just blown over in sometimes less than a week or whatever, simple stuff that seems like the end of the world to them due to it being the biggest thing they ever faced and seeming like there's no way out, and the guilt that the parents go through -talk about regrets - sometimes it's true if you could go back in time and maybe just have one simple talk it could get them on a lifelong course of never hitting that kinda low ever again - it really does kill off an entire family and it's extremely sad....

    But again it's that hindsight being 20/20 thing, nobody has a crystal ball, and stuff can still happen even if someone was trying to pick up on all the signs to help someone else, the "survivors" need to remember that.... Don't put that kinda blame on yourself or it will destroy you.... it's not your fault.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
    Yes, because thats what everybody who is in so much pain that killing themselves seems like a good option should hear, "but think of how much a burden it would be on the people around you!".

    Last time i had a glock barrel under my chin, lemme tell you, how much pain other people would be through was less of a concern when compared to the amount of pain those people put me through. The whole "suicide is selfish" sentiment is one of the most self-absorbed mindsets possible
    I'm hardly counseling, I'm discussing. Of course its a selfish act, its the definition of one....if you think selfish means doing something with little/no regard to how it affects others. Although obviously the person in that state isn't seeing it that way or relief from their pain is more important. Our lives are the only thing that we truly possess so there's the argument as to who but the individual should have a say....but, at the same time, none of us are islands and the damage to others is extreme. If most have thought about it at one time or another, then there's a gap, hopefully huge, between thinking about it and acting (fortunately). imo what I cite is important in making it hard to close that gap. For those that do, agreed its no longer a factor, past the event horizon to draw an analogy.. Your view may differ, but I suppose neither of us can produced a Doctor of Psychiatry degree so its amateur speculation on both our behalves.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-30-2021, 11:09 AM.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
    Last time i had a glock barrel under my chin, lemme tell you, how much pain other people would be through was less of a concern when compared to the amount of pain those people put me through. The whole "suicide is selfish" sentiment is one of the most self-absorbed mindsets possible
    That is it in a nut shell..

    You can not put evry ones life in one example. One Shell. JR

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Thing is, none of us are islands: we have a share a responsibility for those around us. Such an act doesn't factor in how awfully devastating it is to everyone around them, it can change and ruin the lives of those you care about.
    Yes, because thats what everybody who is in so much pain that killing themselves seems like a good option should hear, "but think of how much a burden it would be on the people around you!".

    Last time i had a glock barrel under my chin, lemme tell you, how much pain other people would be through was less of a concern when compared to the amount of pain those people put me through. The whole "suicide is selfish" sentiment is one of the most self-absorbed mindsets possible

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  • BWS
    replied
    Sorry for your loss Tom. Have been through it(grieving) more than once. It just plain sucks.

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  • garyhlucas
    replied
    Very sorry to hear about your loss. I lost my best friend to suicide, before the brain cancer could kill him. I had just arrived from out of town and was going to visit him the next day. It invalidated all his life insurance and his wife and kids lost their house as a result.

    Then I had a young engineer working with me and the boss fired him because he was having a lot of personal problems, like his twin sister dying of a brain aneurism. He called and told me he found a new job and was doing well. Then the recruiter that got him the job called and told me he had killed himself!

    Shortly before that I started up a plant in Washington state and was going home after 18 months for good. A young guy I was mentoring asked to speak to me before I left. He then related how his older brother had committed suicide, and his younger brother too! He told me that working with me had made him realize that you can feel good about yourself by doing your very best, even if no one else sees it. I visited the plant 8 years later. He had just finished a 5 year apprenticeship as a tool and die maker.

    I started seeing psychiatrist when I was unhappy in my job and had no drive to get up off the couch at night. I take a mild antidepressant ever since. Happily quit my job and got the urge back to do things. The only bad part was I got fired from the new job after six years. I was on a jobsite, had forgotten my medicine for a couple days, and a coworker edited down a text message to make it look like I was harassing him. I should have waited a couple days and got him fired when I show the proof of the lie in person. My boss immediately believed the lie and texted others about me being a problem and I let him have both barrels, instead of the coworker.

    So please, don't be afraid to ask for help. Lots of us have been there.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom S View Post
    Thanks for the sentiments and concern guys. I'm doing fine (for real), I've got a supportive wife and some good friends and a phone number to call if I need to talk to a professional.

    Funeral is tomorrow, thankful the family can actually hold one and invite friends/family. A couple months ago that would not have been possible and would have made this much more difficult.

    Stay safe guys.
    Sorry to hear about your loss.. Im glad you posted it, that is the type of stuff that gets people talking and maybe, just maybe will help someone directly.

    And lemme say, from first hand it isn't always noticeable and within any demographic.

    When I was working I had to handle several, more than five suicides. The range of types of people were telling. ALL types. So keep your eyes and ears open. Even if it sounds like idle talk. Sometimes its not.

    Thanks for the insight Tom... JR

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    On a lighter note (well maybe not) I have an older brother that is a gem, he told me if I had a relapse/reaction from the original problem and it crippled me that he would move me into his house and feed me creamed corn and yams lol
    I told him no way cuz what goes in must come out and he's not wiping my butt for me in fact nobody is,,, he said no freakin way he was going to hire out for that but if that won't work plan B was to have me engineer a butt wiper and he'd build it on my mill with my guidance,,,

    I told him if it really gets that bad then im definitely opting out.... he said he understood but wanted me to know i still had the option... what a great guy...
    2X72 butt grinder. (laughter is the best medicine)

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    On a lighter note (well maybe not) I have an older brother that is a gem, he told me if I had a relapse/reaction from the original problem and it crippled me that he would move me into his house and feed me creamed corn and yams lol
    I told him no way cuz what goes in must come out and he's not wiping my butt for me in fact nobody is,,, he said no freakin way he was going to hire out for that but if that won't work plan B was to have me engineer a butt wiper and he'd build it on my mill with my guidance,,,

    I told him if it really gets that bad then im definitely opting out.... he said he understood but wanted me to know i still had the option... what a great guy...

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  • ikdor
    replied
    I'm sure there are different kinds of depression, but it seems that some are a chemical unbalance in the brain that just make it function differently. I have heard from some that medication helped restore the balance, but I knew a very smart woman with three young kids and a husband who ended her life. You just have to conclude that rational though will not function well enough to save you sometimes.
    This discussion has shown once again that there's a lot of hardship around and you never really know what's going on behind peoples facade. Appreciate the people telling their story to show others they're not alone dealing with these things.

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  • Tom S
    replied
    Thanks for the sentiments and concern guys. I'm doing fine (for real), I've got a supportive wife and some good friends and a phone number to call if I need to talk to a professional.

    Funeral is tomorrow, thankful the family can actually hold one and invite friends/family. A couple months ago that would not have been possible and would have made this much more difficult.

    Stay safe guys.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    It makes one wonder if in allot of cases depression is somewhat of a "luxury",,,
    just seems like we got a breakdown in the hundred's of specific types and names for it now, I know history has documented some of the main kinds but seems to me things are doing nothing but getting way worse, people were too occupied with just trying to stay alive back then for most of them to even give a thought about "conveniently checking out" in fact I believe it went totally 180 degree's against their hardwiring/instincts and now im not so sure....

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  • rmcphearson
    replied
    I’ve been down near the point of checking out. I believe it had nothing to do with depression. I was tired and ashamed of being a burden for friends and family. They were tired of listening to my problems. Drugs helped me start to not give a ****, numbing my senses. It was a short term solution. The long term solution was learning a valuable trade, steady employment, and not being a burden to anyone anymore.

    Mike L46, I’m glad you find enjoyment in something. “And the sons of engineers ride their fathers’ majic carpets made of steel.” Enjoy the ride.You’ve got me reading about fiat spiders. And as a fairly new rider I’d like to hear about your bikes one day.

    And thank you Tom S for saying your bit.
    -Roland
    Last edited by rmcphearson; 07-29-2021, 10:06 AM.

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