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O/T: My state of California has gone looney tunes with power usage restrictions.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    A little fun fact relating to California and solar power. I am in South Carolina and my solar system has been generating less power for the last week or so. Its due to the smoke haze in the atmosphere drifting all the way here from the CA fires. You can actually see the haze in the air, its been widely reported. Fortunately, my system has enough capacity to still power all my needs even with the reduced efficiency. I would guess that solar power installations in California are experiencing a MUCH larger reduction in output because of the smoke.

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    You can't use some electricity!

    Actually, you can't, because you surely have a grid-tied system, which means that by law, you cannot use your own generated electricity, you HAVE TO send it to the power company. In a power failure, you have "no juice" same as everyone else.

    I have panels here, but I have no grid tie, so I can do whatever I want with them.
    Although I want to believe you understand the theory of how grid tied solar works, your statement is VERY misleading.

    You indeed can and do use your "own generated electricity" in a grid tie system, its any EXCESS generated power beyond your immediate needs that gets sent to the power company/grid. If you are producing say 5kw and consuming 5kw, NOTHING gets sent to the grid/power company. If you generate say 7kw and are only using 5kw then in that case 2kw is indeed sent back to the grid for which you are given credit via a bi-directional smart meter also known as net metering.

    Its true that in a power/grid failure a grid tie solar system has no power and must shut down in milliseconds. The term used is anti islanding and its a requirement. However, there are now grid tie inverters that CAN still produce power in a grid outage scenario, its only a small percentage of the inverters rating and NOT tied to the grid, its usually a receptacle right on the inverter, intended for emergency use. So, just because its a grid tied system it does NOT mean you necessarily have "no juice", it all depends on the inverter you have.

    AND to further confuse issues, there are now what is known as hybrid off grid inverters, that's what I have. The inverter does "connect" to the grid BUT NEVER sends power to the grid. It can consume/draw power FROM the grid if needed to supplement the solar generated if the load demands exceed the solar energy generated. The loads are "shared". They can also use utility power to charge the batteries and have a bypass mode where the grid supplies all the loads. These configurations are all set in the parameters and not mandatory, you can operate with no grid connection at all if desired. STILL, the hybrid inverters are considered as a off-grid system, because they NEVER send power TO the grid.

    Solar inverters have come a long ways. As a example, my inverter has a 450V input rating for the solar panels. My panels output well over 300V on the average day and feed the inverter with just a pair of #12 wires due to that high voltage. Its a lot more complicated setup than a couple small panels, a harbor freight 12V inverter and a couple golf cart batteries.
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 07-30-2021, 06:07 AM.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Tenn would be choice #2, Texas #3.
    Diff is I have no one in Tx. I have People in Tenn.. JR

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  • RB211
    replied
    Tenn would be choice #2, Texas #3.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    California also will not allow you to collect rain water on your own property. Plain and simple, they rule like Communist dictators.
    Fauls. Not so.

    They promote rain water catchment barrlels, Hippies and all. Id promote it, if it rained here. JR in So Cal.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post

    Is it actually possible to fit a solar panel up there???
    Hahahaa! Right!

    Next they will say you cant own your own solar panels.
    We will do it for you.

    Yeah, thats the day when is say GFY California. Kids pack up, off to Tennesee. JR

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    You have to send it to the power company??? Just how does that work?
    -As I understand it, and I welcome clarification or correction, that it has to do with the "smart" meters. They work in both directions, and the power generated by the solar panels goes into the grid, while the house is fed back from said grid, like normal. The power you supply is simply subtracted from what you use, AND, the power co. can monitor and tally how much is being generated by all the panels. (Most of which, as I understand it, are state-subsidized.)

    A generator is a different animal, it's only used in emergencies. The rooftop panels are part of the overall grid supply.

    Doc.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    The goffy part is I didnt start out here in California.

    I started out in Colorado Springs, CO. Was born there. And lived there.

    Then All other places, like NJ.

    Chit, Newark New Jersey in the 70s was still a lil rough around the edges. The smell of the settling ponds used to gravitate towards them.

    Yep, our jumping thing the kids use now were settling ponds for the City sewere. It gets a nice thick layer on top and you have a nice "rubbery" surface on the liquid below. The size of teo football feilds each. (scoccor).

    So yeah, thats New Jersery. Playing in the dump (actually loved that) and jumping on sewage settlement ponds.

    Yeah, SEA was next. Good times.

    California has the highest population of Federal Empleeys they say. Odd.

    I have my solar panels on my roof to diminish what I might have to pay my land loard, which as Jerry pointed out is Edison.. Edison and I have an aggreement as of now. We dont charge each other. It works out. JR

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    You have to send it to the power company???

    Just how does that work? I am in the process of buying a generator for my house. It will have a disconnect switch so that it will not be possible for it to back feed the power lines. This is a safety requirement because they do not want any lines that have been damaged by a storm (hurricane) to be live when the power company workers are working on them to restore power.

    So, as far as I know, it will be completely impossible for me to send any power to the power company or to my neighbors unless I drop an extension cord over the fence. In essence, my generator will never be tied to the grid. What state are you in and just how does that tie-in work without endangering the power company workers?



    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    You can't use some electricity!

    Actually, you can't, because you surely have a grid-tied system, which means that by law, you cannot use your own generated electricity, you HAVE TO send it to the power company. In a power failure, you have "no juice" same as everyone else.

    I have panels here, but I have no grid tie, so I can do whatever I want with them.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 07-30-2021, 01:55 AM.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    You think?



    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    And to think that this is the sate that wants to ban the sales of gasoline or diesel powered cars in less than 15 years!
    Hell they can't even power up a desktop pc today.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

    Not only is this false, California actually offers incentives to capture rainwater (Rainwater Capture Act of 2012).
    Up until 2012, it was illegal. Can you guess what year I left California? Excuse me if California actually did something that made sense in my absence.

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  • barracudajoe
    replied
    Oregon is trying to out do kommifornia in adopting idiotic left wing, socialist, environmentalist ideals and have ruined the state. The latest move is to follow them into the dark with a 100% "green power mandate" We'll soon be shivering in the dark without any power during the winter. Thats why those of us in the southern area what to join Idaho or join a few N. Kommifornia counties and form the State Of Jefferson. My advice is not to move here unless you like the socialist form of gov't.

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  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

    Not only is this false, California actually offers incentives to capture rainwater (Rainwater Capture Act of 2012).
    Oh, c'mon TC! There you go again quoting facts. Geez.

    -js

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  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    California also will not allow you to collect rain water on your own property. Plain and simple, they rule like Communist dictators.
    Not only is this false, California actually offers incentives to capture rainwater (Rainwater Capture Act of 2012).

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    California’s biggest products are fruits and nuts.
    Used to be a joke that went something along the lines of: "yeah, California is like the worlds largest granola bar. Once they export the raisins all that's left are the fruits and the nuts!" 🤪

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