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OT- Rain Gutters

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    I get a double whammy every spring from the pine trees, and the results of the moron that built my house on a concrete slab, with the front side of the garage 18" below grade. If I am late with blowing out the gutters, the downspouts get plugged, the gutter overflows, and water percolates down to the footer and through the wall flooding the garage floor. Gutter guards are not effective against long leaf pine needles and the thousands of little worm looking things that the trees drop after blooming. I failed to notice the below grade issue when I bought the place 42 years ago or would have passed on the deal. In my defense, the contractor planted Azaleas along the garage wall which sort of hid the problem area.
    Don't ya just love people ? lol you could always build the worlds first auger gutter system :-)

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    • #17
      Yeah and it will begin again an a month or so when the needles start falling. Probably going to dig along the wall and install some sort of drain to carry the water away from the slab. This has been discussed a lot in the past and each time it comes up, the wife raises a stink about me digging up HER Azaleas. The other problem is how, and where to send the water.
      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

      Lewis Grizzard

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dave C View Post
        This has been discussed a lot in the past and each time it comes up, the wife raises a stink about me digging up HER Azaleas.
        Your on your own Dave -- good luck....

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        • #19
          Could be worse Ya'll --- my brother lives out in the sticks, was making sure his gutters were clean - taking a hose up to the roof and cleaning out the downspouts when out pops a rattler,,, his dog just got bit by one two weeks ago - full recovery with some very expensive anti-venom...

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          • #20
            Leafguard is joke in the PNW... Sure they shed larger leaves , but hemlock and doug fir needles roll with the flow.. Try claiming their "we clean for free if they clog". lol Ask a few of my neighbors. Mesh (or nothing like me) works best out here.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Dave C View Post
              ................... Gutter guards are not effective against long leaf pine needles and the thousands of little worm looking things that the trees drop after blooming. .............
              Oak trees here drop a thing that looks like a floppy brown pipe cleaner an inch or so long. Tangles in everything. Any of the coarse mesh get clogged. Fine mesh, no. No idea how the fine mesh does against elm seeds, they stick to anything also.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #22
                These work well and are quite cheap at $2 for a 3 foot section. They slide under the shingles and clip onto the gutter. Got them at Menards, available in white or brown. In a downpour you will have some overspill.

                Click image for larger version

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                • #23
                  Chips, I like those, mine are more like just using the under guard with the holes but your screen seems coarse enough not to plug and would keep the small stuff out,,,

                  some of mine are cracked and getting old im going to start checking into replacing them all with what you got i think it would be the ticket for where im at.

                  second thought --- I bet the UV rays would get to that screen in short order where im at, i wonder if they make a coarse stainless steel mesh with plastic under support, that fine SS mesh looks like water would just pour over it and not through it....
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 07-31-2021, 08:46 AM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                    .........................
                    second thought --- I bet the UV rays would get to that screen in short order where im at, i wonder if they make a coarse stainless steel mesh with plastic under support, that fine SS mesh looks like water would just pour over it and not through it....
                    UV does quickly eat white plastic in some cases.... depends on the pigment density. I've had some plastic gutters on the shed for a decade or two, no problem yet.

                    All common plastic fails/degrades in a few years of weather, and the screen in those pictured guards would be gone in a couple or three years most likely
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #25
                      Toss in the fact that I get about double the annual sunshine of other states and also live a mile high and the UV factor goes off the charts...

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Glug View Post
                        The treats contributed by the squirrels and raccoons can add to gutter cleaning fun.

                        I have wondered how the various screen designs interact with snow and ice.
                        Looks like you and I are the only ones with ice concerns. Seems to me that all the gutter guard designs would precipitate an ice damn. Snow melting on a roof from the heat of the home hits a frozen gutter guard starting an ice damn. Here in Michigan it can happen with open gutters. It seems that any gutter cover would make things worse.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by rickyb View Post

                          Looks like you and I are the only ones with ice concerns. Seems to me that all the gutter guard designs would precipitate an ice damn. Snow melting on a roof from the heat of the home hits a frozen gutter guard starting an ice damn. Here in Michigan it can happen with open gutters. It seems that any gutter cover would make things worse.
                          Surprisingly, the metal gutter guards seem to melt off fairly quickly. Plastic not as fast, because the metal (usually aluminum) conducts solar heating pretty well, and plastic does not. So any portion exposed will start clearing near it when the sun hits it.

                          At night, more of an issue. Your attic is not supposed to heat the roof, though. And, the same thing happens in spades doubled with overhung eaves, where a beautiful ice dam(n) can build up due to cold air circulating under it.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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