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Loving stainless steel nuts and bolts

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    I'm just real curious what would happen to the properties of the fastener, if they were finished to Clickspring levels of perfection?
    They would be better for sure. Surface finish is a major factor for crack propagation.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    Yes I believe they have an alloy now for that application rated at up to 310,000 PSI, I'm sure those are more than a buck or two a pop!
    https://arp-bolts.com/
    I'm just real curious what would happen to the properties of the fastener, if they were finished to Clickspring levels of perfection?

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    The ARP stuff is nice and expensive like you say. I recall they had a chrome-moly bolt or stud set that was rated up to 250,000 PSI. IIRC they were using a high-end VAR 4340 or some such. But then again not many can lay claim to holding the crankshaft in a dragster.
    Yes I believe they have an alloy now for that application rated at up to 310,000 PSI, I'm sure those are more than a buck or two a pop!
    If you're looking for a really good and informative read on the metallurgy,science, and engineering behind what makes for quality fasteners order or download their catalog.
    The technical section is quite inclusive and an absolute must-read for anyone interested in the design and engineering involved with fasteners in general, not just the ARP branded products.

    https://arp-bolts.com/

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    ARP makes some very nice stuff rated @180,000 psi tensile strength, not cheap though.
    The ARP stuff is nice and expensive like you say. I recall they had a chrome-moly bolt or stud set that was rated up to 250,000 PSI. IIRC they were using a high-end VAR 4340 or some such. But then again not many can lay claim to holding the crankshaft in a dragster.

    Leave a comment:


  • Illinoyance
    replied
    Originally posted by deltap View Post
    Most hardware store stainless (8-18) is weaker than grade 5 steel fasteners. If replacing grade 5, new fasteners should be at least the same strength.
    Actually 18-8 stainless bolts have about 3/4 the strength of a non heat treated bolt. Way less than a grade 5. There is a risk replacing steel bolts with stainless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    You know, any joint in a high confidence structure needs to be "designed". When a fastener fails, you used the wrong one or the wrong quantity, or used it wrongly. An SS bolt is as good as any other fastener when used properly.
    Yep, don't expect to get high quality/high strength fasteners in the Home Depot bolt bin, although they do typically meet low stress consumer applications quite satisfactorily.
    I've used some very high quality fasteners on some custom suspension applications where appearance did take a back seat to performance.
    ARP makes some very nice stuff rated @180,000 psi tensile strength, not cheap though.

    Click image for larger version

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by psomero View Post
    Inferior mechanical properties, that SS crap. Good luck on high proof joints when the heads pop off.
    You know, any joint in a high confidence structure needs to be "designed". When a fastener fails, you used the wrong one or the wrong quantity, or used it wrongly. An SS bolt is as good as any other fastener when used properly.

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  • Ian B
    replied
    Edward, I'm totally with you on this one. I have been assembling drawers to fit into 19" racks, nad I'm using stainless steel fastenings, all Ebay/China. I've amassed a nice collection in the M2, M3 & M4 sizes, various heads. I love them! Strong enough for what I need, great finish, they look nice and they're dirt cheap.

    Remember: shiny is good.

    Ian

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  • psomero
    replied
    Inferior mechanical properties, that SS crap. Good luck on high proof joints when the heads pop off.

    Leave a comment:


  • oxford
    replied
    I used to work a place that made equipment for the food industry, like stated above, seizing stainless hardware is NOT an old wives tale.

    Use a high quality anti seize for stainless and you’ll have a sporting chance of getting it apart.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by ikdor View Post
    I've seized SS hardware just by running a nut on by hand. They were new though which makes it more likely.
    Yep. You need to get grease or never-seez on there to "poison" the surface.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    If I have to remove any SS hardware, or any hardware and I'm not sure if any anti seize compound was used I use this stuff................. https://blasterproducts.com/product/...ter-penetrant/

    JL.............

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    All of the above. I helped work on (as in repair) a commercial fishing boat starting when I was a teen. Never-seize and stainless bolts were an absolute must. As others have noted, I, too, have had a nut seize on a bolt just by hand-turning it. That's the nature of the beast- it "cold welds" if you so much as look at it funny.

    But pretty much anything as a coating or lubricant will prevent that. We used never-seize, of course, because that's what it's fir, but barring that, a drop of motor oil, gun oil, a wipe of beeswax, spray WD-40 (although you risk it drying and galling later upon removal) Loctite, pipe sealant, whatever. Anything that prevents dry metal-on-metal contact.

    Following that advice, I've been using stainless on anything that might get exposed to weather. Cars, trucks, outdoor fixtures, trailers, you name it. As noted, it's often been a godsend going back to the assembly years later.

    But, also as others have noted, hardware-store grade stainless is a pretty low grade. The rule of thumb I was told, years ago, was consider it basically Grade 3. Better can be had, but if you're just picking it up from ACE or Home Depot or something like that, it's pretty soft. Worth keeping in mind if you're dealing with something that may have a lot of stress on it.

    Doc.

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  • deltap
    replied
    Most hardware store stainless (8-18) is weaker than grade 5 steel fasteners. If replacing grade 5, new fasteners should be at least the same strength.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Yes, I have heard many people like to use the impact wrench to help shock loose rusty or seized fasteners.
    I do believe that works. Probably a very good idea. I just have a hard time to determine if the bolt is actually
    moving or if it is seizing. With a hand wrench I can always (most always) tell. Maybe I am being too careful
    and need to expand my horizons.

    -Doozer
    It's a great thing - I have a little 3/8" for the small stuff again just dial in a low setting and what else works is "reverse to forward shots" every once in awhile try to tighten, you'd be surprised at how much that can help - the fastener is "stuck" in two different places - the threads and the place it's jammed against and holding things together --- actually the latter is the first place of resistance as it's diameter is larger,,, get it too move back and forth even a little and then the other usually will go next...

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