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Loving stainless steel nuts and bolts

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  • fixerup
    replied

    Quote "Originally posted by ikdor View Post
    I've seized SS hardware just by running a nut on by hand. They were new though which makes it more likely.

    Yep. You need to get grease or never-seez on there to "poison" the surface."



    I work in a clean room environment and We are asked to clean all the components with a de-greaser solvent before assembling. We had major problems with many galling stainless fasteners. I think the galling issue is more likely to happen when the fasteners are new or they have cleaned. The old fasteners with some oxidation formed on the surface seems to be less likely to bind. When I take apart some stainless fasteners and I feel some friction between the two, I stop immediately and spray some penetrating oil and move the fasteners back and forth until the penetrating oil seep inside and then it will unscrew without completely welding its self together, which is a good thing in a clean room, we can't use grinders.
    Because of our clean environment we can't use molybdenum, antiseize etc......... but now they have allowed us to use a silicone base vacuum grease and very little of it. It has worked well so far.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Interesting…

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Did not think molybdenum was safe to ingest, but I don't know everything.

    -D
    Yes I too thought it strange, never thought to look it up until now.

    Look at primary additive.

    https://www.grainger.ca/en/product/A...Z/p/LCT1167237

    This got me looking a little deeper.

    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Mo...hProfessional/


    Molybdenum is an essential trace element that is naturally present in many foods and is also available as a dietary supplement.
    They say that a day is wasted if you don't learn something new.
    Well I guess I can now put that grease gun with moly grease in the kitchen and give myself a pump or two of my daily moly supplement this morning.



    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post

    Never tried lanolin, I wonder how that would work?
    I have some Locktite food grade anti-seize for SS that I acquired from a welder buddy of mine that was doing some work at a cheese plant and I believe that the main ingredient is molybdenum.
    Did not think molybdenum was safe to ingest, but I don't know everything.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    There is one place on a car where SS bolts belong IMHO, that is on the exhaust manifolds. If you've ever had to drill one out while laying on your back, you know what I mean. I replaced mine with SS studs and brass nuts, never a problem since the last 10 yrs.

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  • sid pileski
    replied
    These are some of the SS bolts I used in my suspension components when. Built my car. At the time, the largest bolt there was IIRC, was $18.00 each with my dealer discount.
    But, they look Awesome.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Is food grade anti-seize basically lanolin ?
    The stuff I used at the grain elevators, that is
    basically what it looked like.

    -D
    Never tried lanolin, I wonder how that would work?
    I have some Locktite food grade anti-seize for SS that I acquired from a welder buddy of mine that was doing some work at a cheese plant and I believe that the main ingredient is molybdenum.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Is food grade anti-seize basically lanolin ?
    The stuff I used at the grain elevators, that is
    basically what it looked like.

    -D
    Dunno, but I've wanted to melt some lanolin together with lard and try that for screw cutting. One of those recipies you find in 100-yr old machine shop books.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    I had a horse trailer custom built a million years ago. It was a Luxury Liner 12 horse. It had polished aluminum siding with a stainless steel roof. The company didn't use a gasket between the roof and sides and after one year the aluminum siding was terribly corroded where the two met. I took it back to them and had them replace the siding and put a rubber gasket between the two. After that there never was a problem. That was my first introduction to dissimilar metals in contact! The picture is not of my trailer but mine was nearly just like it except mine had a thermal King AC unit on the front. They were the ultimate in horse transportation back then. Click image for larger version

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    Not to take anything away from Clickspring but I think it would be hard to beat ARP's quality.
    At $55 for one connecting rod bolt these aren't your average barn door bolts. Anything that is technologically possible to increase strength and durability has been incorporated into their top tier fasteners already.
    They have some very demanding and fussy clientele in F1 as well as the aerospace industries.
    What you be talking about! Barn doors have rights! My barn doors get the best hardware on the planet! (not)

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Is food grade anti-seize basically lanolin ?
    The stuff I used at the grain elevators, that is
    basically what it looked like.

    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • projectnut
    replied
    Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    I am an old guy and keep my stuff forever.I have a very large selection of stainless nuts and bolts. For the last 20 years or so ,I have been routinely replacing plain steel hardware with stainless ,when I am repairing things.I know that there is an old wives tale about stainless nuts and bolts seizing up. Dont believe it.Now I am not talking about high strength suspension parts.I work on a lot of outdoor stuf ,like mowers ,four wheelers ect, If you cant afford stainless bolts ,try using stainless nuts with plain steel bolts. You can buy ss nuts online almost as cheap as plain steel The next time you take it apart ,you will be smiling..Edwin Dirnbeck
    If you've never had them seize you haven't used enough of them. The company I worked for made food processing and packaging systems. We used literally hundreds of thousands of stainless steel fasteners. Most were used in areas that required a daily washdown. The USDA required stainless hardware. In potential food contact areas they had to be 316. In non contact areas they could be 18-8. It was easy to tell if an assembler cheated and didn't use anti- seize (food grade required in food contact areas). It was only a matter of months, and sometimes weeks before fasteners started to seize. In areas where panels had to be removed daily for cleaning mechanics applied new anti seize on a weekly basis.

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  • Tungsten dipper
    replied
    So why does stainless nuts fuse to stainless bolts when TIG welding when you are just welding the bolt?

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  • RB211
    replied
    I had a SS bolt and nut seize on my 3D printer, destroyed a part to remove it. No 3D printer to print the part that broke, I now put anti seize on ALL SS hardware.

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  • Willy
    replied
    Not to take anything away from Clickspring but I think it would be hard to beat ARP's quality.
    At $55 for one connecting rod bolt these aren't your average barn door bolts. Anything that is technologically possible to increase strength and durability has been incorporated into their top tier fasteners already.
    They have some very demanding and fussy clientele in F1 as well as the aerospace industries.

    Leave a comment:

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