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VERY OT. 1/32 Slot Cars

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  • I make chips
    replied
    Funny how things change.
    When I slot raced the speeds got high and the silicone tires fragged bigtime. Tracks were scrubbed and we went to foam tires with the wintergreen cleaning routine and speeds almost doubled as they stuck like mad. Now it seems they're going back to silicone.

    Something I noticed from RB's pics is the controller. It's the same one I used over 50 years ago!
    Last edited by I make chips; 08-12-2021, 05:05 PM.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    You need some wintergreen oil to soften up those tires. There's a few other substances too, but their names escape me atm. I knew some guys that used them on bikes tires to squeeze a few more laps out of some rubber. Always seemed like too much hassle for me to bother with though.
    The rear tires are replaced with silicone ones.

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    You need some wintergreen oil to soften up those tires. There's a few other substances too, but their names escape me atm. I knew some guys that used them on bikes tires to squeeze a few more laps out of some rubber. Always seemed like too much hassle for me to bother with though.

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  • interrupted_cut
    replied
    One of my former coworkers custom built his own slot car motors in the 60's. He built his own flux coil that he would use to sort through the magnets at the store, and monitor them for loss of field strength. He would wind his own rotors, and built a motor dyno for testing the output. It didn't hurt that he worked at an aerospace company that was on the leading edge of high performance electric drives and actuators, so there was always some engineering wizard who was willing to help with technical challenges. He also became a hired slot car driver at the local tracks and made money doing that that he then spent on his own full size SCCA sports car racing.

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  • RB211
    replied
    Think I’ll make one of these…

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by OaklandGB View Post
    Ah the 1960s! You have brought back memories of my first slot car track. Cam with red and blue open cockpit E Type Jaguars. Not sure of the scale, but the cars were about 5" long. Buddies also had some but were the smaller types that seemed to burn out pretty quickly.

    I can almost smell a whiff of ozone from the little motors and the brush pickups...
    5” long sounds like 1/32 scale which is the most popular. 1/24 is popular with the scratch build crowd. The little cheap crappy ones are HO scale and one scale slightly larger. 1/32 is by far the most popular

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  • RB211
    replied
    Originally posted by thin-woodsman View Post

    I saw a storefront dedicated to this somewhere (Montreal maybe? they like their indoor games there) and remember chuckling and shaking my head, and remembering the old Tyco sets.

    From a machining/mechanical/shop-owner's perspective, however, I am curious about the opportunities for improvement in these cars.

    Presumably the current available to the car is fixed, so efficiency of motor and mass of the car are the most important variables, and those will have long been optimized so that everyone effectively has the same values.

    After that, does aerodynaic design play much of a part at that scale? Do shocks & tire design (beyond just a racing slick from optimal material) improve things? Are there opportunities for shifting the center of mass inside the car to improve cornering? Can a lithium-ion battery be added to the car, and some sort of Mad Max turbo-boost ("It's the blower!") added?
    Well, people pay extra to have metal frames, ball bearing pillow blocks, metal wheels that connect to axles with set screws instead of the push on plastic ones.
    People also buy 300$ tire truer’s that work the opposite of a surface grinder. The wheel spins, and is transversed across the sanding medium. Anyone here could make those. Also setting plates that are nothing more than a flat piece of Aluminum with a slot so the car can rest as if it was on the track so you can set the front ride height. Ride height gauges are another machining opportunity.

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  • OaklandGB
    replied
    Ah the 1960s! You have brought back memories of my first slot car track. Cam with red and blue open cockpit E Type Jaguars. Not sure of the scale, but the cars were about 5" long. Buddies also had some but were the smaller types that seemed to burn out pretty quickly.

    I can almost smell a whiff of ozone from the little motors and the brush pickups...

    Leave a comment:


  • thin-woodsman
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    Well, maybe not too OT, there’s some machining opportunities with these things like any mechanical hobby. There’s slot car tracks at two of the cities I lay over in, Cincinnati and LA. Bought two cars, been having a blast with them. An actual hobby I can bring on the road with me!
    I saw a storefront dedicated to this somewhere (Montreal maybe? they like their indoor games there) and remember chuckling and shaking my head, and remembering the old Tyco sets.

    From a machining/mechanical/shop-owner's perspective, however, I am curious about the opportunities for improvement in these cars.

    Presumably the current available to the car is fixed, so efficiency of motor and mass of the car are the most important variables, and those will have long been optimized so that everyone effectively has the same values.

    After that, does aerodynaic design play much of a part at that scale? Do shocks & tire design (beyond just a racing slick from optimal material) improve things? Are there opportunities for shifting the center of mass inside the car to improve cornering? Can a lithium-ion battery be added to the car, and some sort of Mad Max turbo-boost ("It's the blower!") added?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ringo
    replied
    yeah, me too as a kid.
    back in the '60s.
    I thought it was 1/32, but maybe 1/24
    There was a road course, banked oval, dragstrip

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Ok, here’s the video of driving my car on a professional 6 lane track at Electric Dreams in LA. The car has magnets on the bottom that help keep it on the track and are removable. Even with the magnets and silicone rear tires, AND adjusted ride height, AND adjusted stiffness of the motor pod, AND adjusted looseness of the body to the frame, one still has to manage speed and braking. The hand held controller I use has adjustable braking so I can dial in the right feel for the track. You can hear me punching it on the straight aways. This car is for a beginners class, limited to two magnets, and change in tires. It’s fast but nothing like that video in Helsinki which seems to not be fun. The Lambo car has a magnet installed as well but for that class car to race, no magnets are used, makes it much harder.

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  • larry_g
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post

    No reason that you couldn't, the cameras are small and not that expensive. You can view through them on a tablet,computer screen or with VR googles. Sounds like it would be a lot more fun that way.

    I wonder how long it will be before actual full sized racing will be done with VR driving because someone will determine that having a driver in the car is to dangerous.
    In the RC world it is called FPV, first person view, racing. I've tried it once and it was different because you have no peripheral vision.

    The grandson and I have a couple of the cheap 1/28 scale cars that we race around in the shop when the weather is bad, https://www.amazon.com/Wltoys-K989-B.../dp/B084VNC78G They are every bit as fun as the big RC cars that we play with outside.

    Then there are the Mini-Z cars. There are tracks and clubs around these cars, http://kyosho.com/mini-z-info/
    Lots of ways to play with small cars.

    lg
    no neat sig line

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by loose nut View Post

    I wonder how long it will be before actual full sized racing will be done with VR driving because someone will determine that having a driver in the car is to dangerous.
    You won't have to wait long ! https://news.clemson.edu/deep-orange...omy-at-180mph/

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    There has to be a type of RC racing nowadays where you put on your hood/view screen and see where the front of the car is like your driving it,

    some of the RC jets are so fast it's the only way you can pilot them,

    this would be as close as you could get to real racing....
    No reason that you couldn't, the cameras are small and not that expensive. You can view through them on a tablet,computer screen or with VR googles. Sounds like it would be a lot more fun that way.

    I wonder how long it will be before actual full sized racing will be done with VR driving because someone will determine that having a driver in the car is to dangerous.
    Last edited by loose nut; 08-02-2021, 10:58 AM.

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    The first vid is more what i remember and as a kid it was fun but now seeing it again it's still drone-like stay in your own lane and just try to keep the car from going off the track with monitoring your speed again Id much rather drive half the speed and have to steer because at least you can change lanes and take someone on an inside turn or all the other variables... for me it would get old real quick...
    maybe, haven't done it since a kid, but it was a blast then (the ubiquitous ho kits). There was definitely skill in getting around the track as fast as possible so it cranked up the brain chemicals....i.e. was really racing and you could figure out how to do a sideswipe at just the right moment to knock your brothers car off track (except 1/2 the time you'd crash as well).

    Searching this morning I saw this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXZeDXmwSQU . I actually found it quite entertaining to watch - as several comments suggest, far more so than modern F1. It looks fun, reasonable cost and takes a lot of skill to keep up with those guys. I'd enjoy a class was maybe build your car with some set power/weight restrictions....bring the design, build and driving into it
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-02-2021, 10:55 AM.

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