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  • Water Wheel Generator

    Friend asked me to make up a water wheel system for his new property. Im wondering about the bearings electrogalvanic corrossion and what to use to make it a durable long lasting affair. Hint i dont want to come back and fix things every month for him in the future. I was thinking of a pair of rollers to set the water wheel axle on so it would be easy to remove for winter storage ect. Any ideas guys. Thanx Mike

  • #2
    Is it legal on the particular stream/river to divert enough water to drive one? In some situations any diversion, of any kind is not permited.

    Just wondering. Iv'e seen and heard of manditory immediate removal and or fines involved.

    If not, Iv'e seen them made from stainless for a water wheel. And Stainless or monel shafting running on bronze? bearings.

    Or another approach is low head hydro. Basically a long hose run upstream connected to a turbine. Their may or may not be restrictions on it's use also.
    Gene

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    • #3
      Mike,

      Here's an interesting link I found a while back. It doesn't answer your particular question but it does address some of the points Gene brought up...

      http://www.montanagreenpower.com/ren...wer/index.html
      Last edited by Mike Burdick; 05-01-2006, 03:23 PM.

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      • #4
        Mike, last I recall you are in Ontario. The regulations that apply to diverting water from any stream are obscenely complex and getting a permit can take years. It doesn't matter if all the water goes back in the stream or not or whether you build a dam or weir or not.

        I wouldn't help with such a project unless your friend has the required permits. You could end up in a mess right along with him. I would advise him to do a little checking with the fish and wildlife people and the water rights branch first.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          As far as the technology is concerned, they've been making water wheels for 300 years... out of wood. Don't mess with success. There's a ton of literature available on water wheel design.

          Or if you want something more modern, check into water turbines from the 19th century. Also very reliable designs.

          But in either case you'll need a significant head to get any amount of power, at least 10 feet, preferrably 15+.
          Leigh
          The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
          of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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          • #6
            here is the site that has all the latest and greatest for home power they should point you in the correct legal morass
            http://www.homepower.com/
            Glen
            Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
            I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
            All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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            • #7
              I would use Lignum Vinate (SP?) wood for the bearings. It was once used as propeller shaft bearings in steamships so it ought to hold up O.K. in a wet environment.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Al Messer
                I would use Lignum Vinate (SP?) wood for the bearings. It was once used as propeller shaft bearings in steamships so it ought to hold up O.K. in a wet environment.
                Lignum Vitae. Good stuff, good for caulking mallet heads, too.

                Vesconite

                http://www.vesconite.com/

                is probably easier to get hold of.

                Tim

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                • #9
                  Glen,

                  Unless that magazine has information specific to Canada it won't be of much use. The regulations here are much different than in the US. British Columbia has perhaps the strictest riparian protection regulations in North America. Ontario is a close second. Also, with a very few grandfathered exceptions you cannot own lakes or streams, even on your own property. If the lake or stream is fish bearing then you must also deal with Fish and Wildlife. Any project that has the potential to disrupt a stream in any way must go through a public notification and review process. Any objection from any potentially affected person can kill your chances if the department doesn't do so first.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    If their stream is fast enough design an undershot wheel.

                    No diversion of flow, nothing in the water but 2-3 buckets at a time so everything's high & relatively dry.
                    Len

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                    • #11
                      There is a material that I use all the time in a fish plant here. It is a material called UHMW or another alternative is Delrin. Both of these materials work as bushings and can stand severe abrasion from sand and debrise especialy UHMW. They can be lubricated but it is only to protect the steel shaft from wear, not the bushing. Water in the plant acts as the lube. The nice thing is that they are normaly lubricated with a vegitable based lube which of course works well to satisfy the environmentalists. I am just designing a unit for my landscape and wood shed that will incorperate a fuctioning eight foot water wheel as part of the design. Mine will work but only for show and as a water feature. It will have UHMW bearing on all rotating surfaces. Good luck with yours.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by QSIMDO
                        If their stream is fast enough design an undershot wheel.
                        That's true... but undershots are extremely inefficient. You'll pay h*ll getting any power out of one of reasonable size. Works great if you make it 20 feet wide

                        And buckets won't work. You have to use flat paddles. With buckets you have to lift the weight of the water up to the point where the bucket is empty, which takes more power than is generated by the flow. So it won't move at all.
                        Leigh
                        The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
                        of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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                        • #13
                          There is more than one way to skin a cat. These units are available and require no disturbance of the stream. It requires fast moving water at least a foot deep and they are expensive. However, it is one way to get around the regs. If they object to it you just pull it out of the stream, same in winter.



                          It makes up to 2kwh per day.

                          http://www.nooutage.com/aquair-uw.htm
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Evan
                            It makes up to 2kwh per day
                            That's enough to power a 60-watt lightbulb plus a 15-watt night light.
                            Leigh
                            The entire content of this post is copyright by, and is the sole property of, the author. No assignment
                            of title nor right of publication shall ensue from presentation of this material on any computer site.

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                            • #15
                              That's enough to power a 60-watt lightbulb plus a 15-watt night light.
                              Or a refrigerator all day, or a microwave for an hour or more. Or 20 compact fluorescents for ten hours.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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