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Over the top packaging, completely on topic.

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  • Over the top packaging, completely on topic.

    I have noticed over the last 20 years that new measuring tools generally arrive in large plastic boxes which increase in size as time passes, Mitutoyo often uses plastic cases that are considerable overkill and a complete waste of time, money and resources. I throw most in the trash.

    Today I received a Fowler coaxial indicator in a plastic case that is 8" X 10" X 2+" full of cut foam, this is uncalled for.
    It is $250.00 tool not a $2500.00 tool, this box will likely also be tossed. Where does it end? I will not be in this business 10 years from now but I suspect that the next 12" dial caliper that I buy will be in a plastic case that is 18" X 10" (-:

  • #2
    ?????????

    I would call that very nice packaging.

    When you toss the case will you just throw the indicator and all the probes into a cardboard box?

    -js
    Last edited by Jim Stewart; 08-23-2021, 08:49 PM.
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

    Location: SF Bay Area

    Comment


    • #3
      For the most part yes, into a padded drawer and the probes will live next to it, I am running out of toolbox room for the increasingly larger packaging, this is not an expensive tool so I do not treat it as such, if I had paid 1500 bucks for it that would be a different matter.

      I have never used it and do not know if it even works well or at all, if it does not work well and will not repeat it will go in the scrap.
      I could of course give it to another machinist here without telling them that it does not work well, I am not that dishonest however (-:

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bented View Post
        For the most part yes, into a padded drawer and the probes will live next to it, I am running out of toolbox room for the increasingly larger packaging, this is not an expensive tool so I do not treat it as such, if I had paid 1500 bucks for it that would be a different matter.

        I have never used it and do not know if it even works well or at all, if it does not work well and will not repeat it will go in the scrap.
        I could of course give it to another machinist here without telling them that it does not work well, I am not that dishonest however (-:
        OK, stipulated that you're not dishonest. Never thought you were.

        How about (should the occasion arise) giving it to another home shop machinist here who might be interested in making it work properly? (Not me, I have a perfectly good coax indicator.)

        -js
        There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

        Location: SF Bay Area

        Comment


        • #5
          I can see where Bented is coming from.
          I have seen Snap On and similar mechanics tools take that path for years.
          As in making the case for the tool as large as possible, presumably to
          enhance the importance of the tool in someone's mind. Like a set of
          screwdrivers that has a display packaging. It takes up so much room
          in the box. Or like an air die grinder, who's packaging includes a space
          for a few whizz wheels, prominently displayed at an appealing presentation
          angle to entice their selection, like a stack of decorated doughnuts.
          Tool packaging takes up way too much space. It is this Japanese 5S thing
          that every company is pushing down everyone's throat. Sort, sustain, setup...
          something like that. Outline everything in foam like a 2 year old's toys.
          Now Johnny.... pick up your toys and put them away. The white lines show
          you where they go....Because you are special and thinking about how to
          impact the world, it's ok you don't have to remember where your toys go.
          The foam shows you where! Now you don't have to think or remember.
          Isn't that easy? Shouldn't everything be easy? Let's make everyone
          have a happy and safe play time and make them have happy foam with
          white outlines that tells them where to put their tools (er...Toys) away.
          Oh, little Johnny, look how many tools you have ??? Snap on man gunna
          sell you a bigger tool box for all your toys (er....Tools). What color tool
          box do you want Johnny? Johnny likes his new hot pink toolbox because
          it organizes all his whizzz wheels just super nicely. Good job Johnny.
          Yes yes yes I know, this does really happen, yes just exactly like that.
          I do not exercise hyperbole when it comes to talking about tools.
          As for my Coax indicators... I keep all the probes in a long, skinny pill bottle.
          The clock I keep in my padded drawer. It takes up 1/4 the space. Easy.
          Maybe if you like the layout of the foam box, just take apart the plastic
          hinge and throw the top away. Keeps the presentation and frees up
          1/2 the room. I have a Blake (usa) and a Links (china) and I drilled out the
          Blake stem to be able to use the china probes, because I have more of them.
          I just make it work. Nothing fancy or sacred. And if it fails to work some day
          and I take it apart, and the clock spring goes BOING ! I will just buy another
          tool. Got stuff to do too. 5S is not one of them. Keep it. Find another sucker.

          ----Doozer
          DZER

          Comment


          • #6
            Yah, the tool packing is kinda ridiculous nowadays. Costs more room than it's worth.
            At work I separate objects according to function and use. And how often I use them.
            Same objects go in the same drawer without anything else:
            Combo wrenches in one drawer
            hammers and chisels/punches in another drawer
            sockets and impact in their own drawer
            mics and telescopic gauges in their own drawer.
            taps, drills, and wrenches in their own drawer
            Everyday stuff in the top (combination square, tape, etc)
            etc
            etc
            etc

            I got everything used off craiglist and ebay, so no extra packaging anyway.
            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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            • #7
              This 5S packaging phenomenon really caters to the OCD / addictive personality people.
              They eat it up. Collect the whole set ! ! ! Now you need the metric tools too ! ! !

              -----Doozer
              DZER

              Comment


              • #8
                Not all hard case packaging is bad. That particular example has way too much space. But for tools that get used less frequently, it can, within reason, work OK. The tools stay protected and are available for use with parts and accessories all in one place, not rattling around in a drawer.

                I have a bore gauge that I leave in a similar case (a more compact one) because it keeps everything together, and undamaged. I don't use it every day, and don't need it to be in a drawer for instant grabbing. It needs set up for the right range anyhow, so a little more trouble is OK.

                I am definitely not OCD... I am a messy workbench person. But I do like to have measuring tools somewhat organized and not under other things, etc. I'll put them on a shop towel on the bench, mostly to have a definite place for them when working, so as to find them when I want them. So not THAT messy.
                2730

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Everything not impossible is compulsory

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bented, I agree with you. Look at the much smaller, but still very nice box that the original Blake co-ax cones in.

                  Sometimes you get lucky. All my micrometers are in tool chest drawers, so the boxes they came in sit empty. One of them is a near perfect fit for a set of adjustable parallels I bought recently on ebay.

                  And my shop-built spindle head tramming device fits nicely in an overly big box for a set of import S&D drills that I rescued from the garbage at work.

                  Those nice rectangular wooden boxes are easier to re-purpose than fancy-schmancy plastic boxes.

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                  • #10
                    Remember when they gave you a choice with certain stuff? cheaper without the storage box, but depending on what you do and how you use it the option of springing a little extra for the box, I can't remember the last time iv seen that as it seems like it's all forced upon us now,,,

                    I dislike most all excessive packaging especially the kind that has zero purpose but to get the product out of a ton of overkill/display packaging only to trow it away..

                    but personally like stuff like specialty tools and things coming in their own box, trick being is not to think you need to jam everything into your tool box be it a machinist box or a mechanics,
                    As small as both my shops are I have shelf room for the specialty boxes that I just stack onto each other and I think it's great --- all the little parts are contained and not mingled with all the other crap from other specialty tooling floating around in a drawer somewhere...

                    I think if I had to work somewhere as a machinist and worry about keeping everything under lock and key I might have a machinist tool box stacked upon a mechanics base box - the kind that has minimal drawers but HUGE open space...

                    I like the box in the OP - too many parts to keep track of - very handy to put everything up when your done and go looking for a stray if somethings missing and also know when you open it the next time everythings going to be there, even specific change wrenches the whole bit...

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                    • #11

                      Sometimes the nice box is just too small, especially when trying to get the cable for a mains power drill back in the box.

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                      • #12
                        It's also image- that box and foam cost $0.39 in bulk, but the idea is
                        that if the seller (not necessarily the manufacturer themselves) makes it
                        look like it's a 'prestige' tool, you'll automatically think it's better than it is.

                        It often works, especially on the untrained and at a subliminal level.

                        I have a bin full of cases that lives in the attic. I sometimes add to it,
                        but I can't recall ever actually going up there in search of a case.

                        On the other hand, the last few things I've ordered on line were 'packaged'
                        in an unpadded envelope, so maybe that counts as a shipping container.

                        t


                        rusting in Seattle

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                          I think if I had to work somewhere as a machinist and worry about keeping everything under lock and key I might have a machinist tool box stacked upon a mechanics base box - the kind that has minimal drawers but HUGE open space...
                          That is actually exactly what I do both at home and at work. The mics stay in their wood cases, the telescope gauges stay in their pouch. The indicators have their boxes. Everything else gets tossed into the appropriate drawer. At work I only have a mid-box and top box on a service cart, that's all I need. More than enough room.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #14
                            Consider giving excess boxes to children to use as pencil cases etc. Plain wooden ones they can paint and decorate as a craft exercise. Anything with metal in it can go to recycling. I collect such stuff for a group of people who pull stuff apart as occupational therapy. The metal they recover may be worth peanuts but getting them out of the house and the feeling they are contributing is important for their mental health.

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                            • #15
                              I bet they could give away a whole lot of those plastic cases before they come close to the cost of replacing a tool damaged in transit and the resulting upset customer.

                              Nice fitted wood boxes are too expensive for a cheap tool.

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