Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sparkplug extension at plug wire end

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Reggie--I did think of that. I have four different kinds of welders here. Shouldn't be a big deal to make an extra deep socket from a couple of standard deep sockets.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
      How will you install it? Do you have an extra deep socket to match the hex body of the plug which has a 1.6" extension glued to it?
      He could do like certain model fords or chebbies and just install it and then build the entire engine around it...

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
        Reggie--I did think of that. I have four different kinds of welders here. Shouldn't be a big deal to make an extra deep socket from a couple of standard deep sockets.
        All you'll need is one standard socket and a piece of tubing of the appropriate length to place in between the drive end and the socket and a bandsaw to cut the socket.
        Did you get yours going yet, I haven't caught up to that thread ...yet.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Location: British Columbia

        Comment


        • #34
          Willy--I haven't started yet. I want to get the T-Head engine running perfectly before I move on to my next build.---Brian
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

          Comment


          • #35
            Sorry for the confusion Brian, I meant the bandsaw.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

            Comment


            • #36
              Okay, the game plan has changed a little bit. instead of having part of the brass turned to 1/16" diameter, it's a lot easier to drill a 1/16" hole completely thru the brass and silver solder a piece of 1/16" diameter cold rolled steel in there instead.
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

              Comment


              • #37
                So, here we have two sparkplugs extended 1". I'm not sure how this will work, but I will leave them to "set up" for 24 hours so the epoxy is totally cured, and then we'll see.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • #38
                  How about heat shrink tubing for an insulator?
                  Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
                  Specialty products for beating dead horses.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Wood is an insulator.
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      Wood is an insulator.
                      More-or-less. When it is required to for-sure be an insulator, it has been vacuum-impregnated with wax, etc, as was done, I believe, to make "hot sticks" for linemen early last century.

                      At high voltages, it may be significantly less good as an insulator than you might think.
                      2730

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Everything not impossible is compulsory

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Oak is quite porous lengthwise- you can actually blow through it and see bubbles come out in a glass of water. This means you can easily impregnate it with say a thin epoxy. You either apply vacuum to one end and suck the epoxy in until it's saturated, or rig up a small pressure vessel to one end of the oak 'stick', and force the epoxy in under pressure. That should provide a more stable piece of wood and increase its volts per mil at the same time, while leaving a natural oak look. You can buy a 'finishing resin' at a hobby shop- it's thin and has a reasonably long setting time.

                        Or, if you're even contemplating the idea of mixing resin, you could just roll yourself a fiberglass tube around the right sized mandrel or former. That'll give you a very high volts per mil rating.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          For what it's worth---In this case wood is not a good enough insulator. I get zapped when just holding the wooden barrel. I had to try it and see for myself, but I would not recommend wood as an insulator.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                            For what it's worth---In this case wood is not a good enough insulator. I get zapped when just holding the wooden barrel. I had to try it and see for myself, but I would not recommend wood as an insulator.
                            Wood dried still has somewhere around 15% moisture content and is a very poor choice for high voltage insulating. Ignition coils normally start at about 10,000 volts and go up from there, HEI type ignitions around 45,000 volts. It takes a very good insulator at those kind of voltages. Now at 12V wood might be a good choice. Didn't you mention earlier that you had some corian? Corian would be a good choice.

                            Also, stay away from your old favorite JB Weld, that has metal filings in it !!

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X