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Cutting oil grooves in a bush.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by boslab View Post
    It’s a terrible thing an oily bush, very slippery, i jest, ball end burr and dremel rotary tool is a cheap and cheerful oil path maker, I’ve seen a really beautiful job done on the lathe by a Russian guy, there’s a video, think it was “ factory dragon” myself
    mark
    Thats no kidding though. I had to use a deep reach grinder to get in deep enough for a 1/8" very ugly groove, spirale down (Inside) a piece of bearing material. Its ugly but worked.

    For me the key was get enough depth in the passage. I had plenty of material so just took it fast and slow. High RPM, slow manual feed.

    Those are the projects you dont take pictures of and they last 100 years, just saying. JR

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  • boslab
    replied
    It’s a terrible thing an oily bush, very slippery, i jest, ball end burr and dremel rotary tool is a cheap and cheerful oil path maker, I’ve seen a really beautiful job done on the lathe by a Russian guy, there’s a video, think it was “ factory dragon” myself
    mark

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    I wonder if a linear actuator attached to the top slide and anchored to the bedslides would not be a simple way to do this.
    First off, cool, forgot you are on my west. Everyone to the east is asleep.

    I dont know why some folks here like to over complicate a things.

    I do like your over complication of the cutter drive. Not bad if you can make it go slow enought. It has to go slow if you are using a static cutter..

    I have played around with the cnc lathe to do some sort of powered head (cutter) in the turn table. Failure lol Compleate. The wires for the small motor got hung up in the tail stock, wrapped. lol. Hey, we. try..

    JR

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  • plunger
    replied
    I wonder if a linear actuator attached to the top slide and anchored to the bedslides would not be a simple way to do this.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    How is this done. .He doesnt show the mechanism behind this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IW1tWxW1OYk
    That was realy nice. I usually dont open tubevid cause its endless. But oil grovves in solid bearings? Yes please.

    I have had to make new bushings that were of a bushing material and oil valleys were needed. It was very difficult. I had a few ruins.

    After watching this team make these bushes was inspiring. Lemme tell you, I cant yet do what they do at a moment.

    I have the machines that can do it, thats always been my limmiting point, ME. Not the machine, never blame your machine for you inability, JR

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  • rkepler
    replied
    Here's another example of cutting the groove using 2:1 miter gears on the toolpost:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uNDzfR58ig

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  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Obviously for a many part run you want power feed.. but when our shop did maintenance bushings that were one or two off, we used a simple manual method.
    First, it's just a oil passage, so the grooves cross-section and variability is not critical. It's just to disperse the oil !
    Also, putting a 360 oil groove near the ends was a no-no, so we did simple loops with an air grinder and a Ball Burr

    The machinist marked the outside of the bushing with a magic marker to the desired pattern and then fastened a wand on the grinders side that ended at the Burrs center.
    He would introduce the Grinder bit into the bushing . turn it on and match the wand end to the marker line and then cross-slide move to groove depth
    and turn the chuck by hand one revolution while following the wand and marks with the carriage wheel .
    You can make ovals or X's or a straight line very fast
    The usual starting point was at the oil hole

    Rich

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
    ................................ I'd probably attempt an electronic coupling before I start buying (or roughly making) bevel gears. ............................
    Making bevel gears is not that horrible. Especially gears of that sort, where one gear is large, and the system is not close tolerance so will not suffer much from having form-cut gears. It looks like both have (or can have) tooth length a small percentage of the pitch cone length.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

    this one appeared on the right hand side 'suggested' list with the OP's link. Quite clever imo...but I really don't want another thing on the todo list. I'd probably attempt an electronic coupling before I start buying (or roughly making) bevel gears. encoder signal from the spindle driving a stepper driven boring bar sled mounted on some cheapo linear rails.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJH2q5ylJXM
    that's the exact one I was thinking of

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  • Doozer
    replied
    My new Pratt & Whitney lathe will cut 1 thread per inch.
    Was thinking that would be useful for oil grooving.
    Especially if you maybe cut 1 right hand and 1 left hand.
    Thinking an oval inside a cylinder kind of affair.
    Need to try it now, Ha !

    -D

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    I've seen a couple on YT that use a chain or wire on a cam, pretty neat tool though I can't for the life of me remember the names of the videos
    this one appeared on the right hand side 'suggested' list with the OP's link. Quite clever imo...but I really don't want another thing on the todo list. I'd probably attempt an electronic coupling before I start buying (or roughly making) bevel gears. encoder signal from the spindle driving a stepper driven boring bar sled mounted on some cheapo linear rails.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJH2q5ylJXM

    Leave a comment:


  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    They feed the carriage in and out with a wobble plate (More or less) that is driven by the lead screw or feed shaft.
    Go here to see more of the carriage feed ( but not all unfortunately )
    Go to 4:40 (only) on this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FA0gRH93Zw

    I said wobble plate which gives a "Loop" type of groove, Because they have a oil ring groove at each end, they use a box cam
    The Cam (Follower) would drive a lever arm and the lever arm would have an adjustable stud for stroke variation settings so the stroke could be set
    for what ever "depth" needed.

    We had a 48 " American lathe that we put a clamped on sprocket on the back of the chuck and that had a chain driving a jack Shaft that ran full length at the back of the Lathe where you would have a taper attachment.
    The shaft was keyed and had a traveling sprocket that followed the carriage. By running a second chain from that sprocket to the carriage and tool slide, we could replicate any and all threads or grooves with chain/sprocket ratios ( AND not load the normal lead screw )
    Rich

    Edit
    We drove the tool slide which was parallel to the spindle , NOT the whole carriage as seen in the video .
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 09-15-2021, 12:41 AM.

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    We used to do it manually with a large nose radius tool in a boring bar. Set a hard stop at the headstock end and clamp the tailstock as a stop at the other end, placed so the tool doesn't break out at either end. At low rpm, plunge the tool in at the tailstock end, manually feed the carriage rapidly to the headstock stop, allow to dwell then reverse feed to the tailstock. Not perfect, not beautiful, but functional.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    I've seen a couple on YT that use a chain or wire on a cam, pretty neat tool though I can't for the life of me remember the names of the videos

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Could just use a coarse thread pitch and pull the chuck around by hand. I have seen guys do that with a ball-shaped bit in the die grinder, in the tool post.

    Leave a comment:

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