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  • Moving new machine from street to garage

    Delivery company will drop the machine in the street or at a loading dock. My driveway is about 30 feet long with a 5 foot rise. Machine weighs about 500 lbs. What would be the best way to get the machine into my shop?

  • #2
    I'm thinking about a wheeled platform- but then I think why not just drag it? It's probably on a skid, and sure the skid is going to leave a lot of slivers on the driveway, but that can be washed off. It would be safer than wheels. You will need a point inside where you can secure a pulley. Fasten a cable to the sled, go around the pulley and back down the driveway, use a vehicle to pull the cable.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      I think we will need few more details on the actual size of the machine and the driveway in question.

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      • #4
        2 2x4,s some rope or some motorcycle tie downs or other straps.. 4 guy s.
        tie to 2x4,s.. lift., carry.. rest as needed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 754 View Post
          2 2x4,s some rope or some motorcycle tie downs or other straps.. 4 guy s.
          tie to 2x4,s.. lift., carry.. rest as needed.
          And you with the whip keeping them focused...

          -js
          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

          Location: SF Bay Area

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          • #6
            500lbs, if on a dolly or wheeled platform can be handled by two careful people - with due regard to top-heaviness of course. 5 ft over 30 is not too much. I'm assuming the driveway is paved, not gravel .
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oxford View Post
              I think we will need few more details on the actual size of the machine and the driveway in question.
              Exactly! "Machine" covers one huge plethora of things it could be and what would be apt for one could very well be the last thing you should do for another.
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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              • #8
                I haven't settled on which manufacturers' machines I'll be getting. One will be a bench top mill (10"x20" travel) and the other a 10"x30" lathe. Shipping weight for each will probably be around 500 lbs. I need a good plan for actually getting them into the shop and set up before ordering.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by elf View Post
                  I haven't settled on which manufacturers' machines I'll be getting. One will be a bench top mill (10"x20" travel) and the other a 10"x30" lathe. Shipping weight for each will probably be around 500 lbs. I need a good plan for actually getting them into the shop and set up before ordering.
                  So, what's this driveway like?

                  Concrete should be no problem, gravel would be a bigger problem.

                  Those machines come on pallets? Probably so, but you might want to find out.
                  2730

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                  • #10
                    When I had a 12" lathe delivered a few years ago, it came off the delivery truck in the street on a pallet truck and a £10 note in the drivers hand got it 50 feet along my concrete driveway to the garage door.
                    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                    • #11
                      Nearly all LTL drivers have a pallet jack on their truck that they need to move items to the drop gate. Flip the guy a 20 dollar bill and ask him to help pull it up the driveway (providing it is paved). It has worked for me in the distant past.

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                      • #12
                        Hi, Depending on the weather, the time available and your own ability as a machinery mechanic you may be able to make the task easier by partially dismantling the machine before attempting to move it.
                        If a lathe removing the saddle, the tailstock, any chucks and perhaps the motor if it is mounted high up at the rear will make it much less top heavy.
                        If a Mill then removing the head and perhaps the column will serve the same purpose,
                        Beware, offshore machines may have been shimmed: straight and you may make yourself a lot of work reassembling them.
                        30 odd years ago I removed the headstock of an offshore made lathe to help get it into my basement and I never got it quite aligned properly again.
                        I am somewhat disabled by arthritis and out of sheer necessity have become quite cunning in order to continue moving and installing machinery. Fortunately my wife is both strong and interested so I have a regular reliable helper.
                        Hope these hints help, Regards David Powell.

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                        • #13
                          500lbs, as far as machines go, isnt that hard to move (again, in comparison to other machines, NOT in general), provided the weight distribution is done properly. If something is shipped to you, odds are the center of gravity is already pretty low to make shipping easier, so the only really difficult part is getting the crate or pallet to move sideways. Dunno how easily you can find them, but stateside i can pick up a furniture dolly with a 1000lbs weight capacity at the local big box store, combine that with something to lever the machine onto said dolly and roll it up the driveway, easy peasy. That said, i kinda like Darrlys idea of using a pulley system to just drag the machine into the garage, or just using a comealong to the same effect

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                          • #14
                            If you can get the driver to pull it up the driveway for a couple extra bucks with a pallet truck that would be your best bet. Second would be to get it set down on a moving dolly as epic says above. Pallet jacks are pretty cheap and plentiful on marketplace around here, perhaps you could buy your own? I did that when I bought my Tormach so I could move it around, and have since started incorporating it's usefulness into all my other benches and stuff I might want moved. It's a handy thing that honestly doesn't take up much room tucked under a bench/machine. One of those tools I wished I would have bought years ago. I've got a euro one so it's a bit thinner/smaller, which in my small shop is a blessing. The initial price can be saved over the years by not having to buy expensive castors for everything .

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                            • #15
                              If you look at the first post again, a 1 in 6 rise (16% grade) is more of an issue than can be solved by having two guys push it uphill. I don't think the idea of "rolling it" up the 16% grade is a happening thing, and clearly no "easy-peasy". Possible, yes, easy, not really, mostly because once you start, you have to either finish or figure a way to block the thing from rolling back.

                              There is also the issue of making sure it is straight and stays that way. A lathe is top-heavy if shipped mounted, and you'd want to have it with the bed aligned uphill. Pushing can allow it to get sideways, pulling probably will not.

                              A forklift would be easy, of course. If a few bucks can get that done, do it. Simple, fast, and reliable.

                              If that is not possible, the pulling idea is much better. it will get the thing up the grade, and may provide two ways to keep it from going back down. First, the cable, etc can hold it if you need to stop for some reason, By just stopping the vehicle, by an internal ratchet, or by being tied off to the anchor point. Second, if the machine and pallet are just pulled up sliding, it may have enough friction to not slide back.

                              Biggest issue pulling with something is that the 30 foot may be longer than the cable if you don't use a vehicle to do the pulling. I know my come-along does not have that much cable on it. I had to use the preventer chain to hold the Rivett cabinet while I moved the come-along to a new location as I let the cabinet down the stairs.

                              Pulling with a vehicle avoids that issue, but may not be quite as "precise". Very do-able, though, if you just need to get the machine up and onto the garage floor "somewhere". Especially a vehicle with a clutch.
                              Last edited by J Tiers; Yesterday, 08:45 AM.
                              2730

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

                              Comment

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