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  • #16
    A couple big guys on the count of 3 can do it. Or a wheeled dolly. My lathe is ~700 total, I moved it in the house by myself off the truck using a wheeled dolly.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #17
      I have used plastic pipe for rollers and found them to be cheap and easy to use. Pry up the leading edge and then pull. If the pallet has fork grooves I use a sheet of plywood and then the rollers. 500 pounds should take very little effort to move.

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      • #18
        In the machine tool world, 500 lbs might as well be a Sherline lathe. If you have the equipment to safely move it by yourself, you can easily move 1000 lbs. I’m thinking pallet truck, or even a wooden sled pulled by a garden tractor. Throw wheels on it, what ever. Folding engine hoist from HF to lift it onto its stand/table. I have a gantry crane and pallet truck. Wood cribbing and a crow bar is how I lifted my 3,000 lb Monarch onto 4x4’s.

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        • #19
          If you're doing this as a long term hobby then you're going to run into the same issue from time to time. So it is worth making something that will let you move stuff up and down the driveway more easily in the long haul. A wheeled dolly would be a good idea. Then either a buddy or two to help push and pull or perhaps a cable pull from the garage to make it a one person job.

          With the dolly idea be sure to match the wheels you use to the surface of the driveway.

          The pallet jack isn't a bad option either. It can both lift and double as a dolly. And it's the sort of thing which can be parked under some other tooling with fairly minimal accommodations for fitting it into your shop setup.

          500 to 600 lbs on a wheeled dolly or pallet jack should be quite manageable for two guys. And if you can get two buddies to help it would be easy peasy. One of you should be pulling to aid with steering.

          For lifting heavier items in the shop I'm a big fan of my engine lift. It's one of the types that has the fold up legs. In addition to that I further break it down and bundle it so it takes up very little space in one corner. I also shortened the legs to make it easier to maneuver. This means I can't use the last longer position on the boom any more. But it was a fair trade for gain in compactness.

          I originally wanted to just rent a lift. But at the time there was none to be had for rent locally that was very close. And the cost of renting had gone up. And they were on sale at the local big tool place. So I bought one thinking I'd use it for the move and new shop setup and sell it. But it's proven too handy to sell.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #20
            My PM 10/22 lathe came in a wooden box on a narrow pallet. It was something close to 400lbs as shipped with some extras inside the crate. Saia trucking with lift gate option, had the guy drop it at the end of my 85ft asphalt drive. I had bought 3 small furniture dollies, each about 24"x24", from Harbor Freight. I think they were about $11 each at that time, and met the truck at the street.

            I had him drop the pallet onto my dollies all lined up, one on each end and one in center. It easily rolled along the level drive with me pushing and steering, right into the garage. My engine hoist took care of the lathe from there to the bench top.

            Your drive's incline may need extra hands to push and steer but seems like it can be done. You might want to attach an anchor rope with someone to hold it from rolling backwards if the pushers need a break.

            If you have a machine that is top heavy, I think I'd lay it down to move it if that is possible. Top heavy items on rollers, on an incline, can get all kinds of squirrely, and you don't want to topple a new machine even it if is well packed. The machine or you or your helpers could get injured.
            S E Michigan

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            • #21
              When I did mine I rented a motorcycle trailer...
              Loaded it in MC trailer and backer trailer to garage...
              From there I used a engine hoist to remove from trailer to spot where it was going to sit...
              My Driveway seems to be on a bit more slope then yours...
              Best of luck with this endeavor but to tell the truth if the guy can unload and move the units to garage for a small nominal fee for you then that would be the best route to go...Money in his pocket would be a 6 pack or dinner for him for the next few days...
              Paul

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              • #22
                If, for some reason, you do not have strong hellpers available, think about what equipment you already have and whether you can arrange to use it to pull your machine to where you want it. I have moved things up to 2000lbs with a 25 $ hand winch bolted in the bed of a pick up truck, a garden tractor, a snowblower and on one occasion a model traction engine., all of them pulled harder than I could mysellf. Just remember that you cannot safely run the machine doing the pulling and attend to the item you are moving at the same time.
                Regards David Powell

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                • #23
                  I was thinking , the OP might be like ...me..
                  more 2x4,s than friends.!....




                  i mean friends that will actually show up when you need them , without all the excuses.
                  but you still likely need cherry picker to get machines in place.,

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                  • #24
                    A six pack and most drivers will but it in the garage.

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                    • #25
                      Iam fortunate, one of my friends is a strong retired fireman, who has a circle of equally strong friends. But it all takes organising and co ordination. Anyway there is satisfaction in being honestly a

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                      • #26
                        THe computer ate the last bit " Honestly able to say " I did it myself" Regards David Powell

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                        • #27
                          A 1 in 6 rise is enough that you need to take some care about how you keep the thing from zinging back through where it started from if things go south. That's enough to give it a good launch if it has wheels.

                          If you are sure you can just deal with it, and want to push it up on wheels, then fine. That's "probably" OK, even though the machine outweighs you. It's surprising how much trouble it is to do that, though, even with less slope than that 1 in 6.

                          Having the delivery be to the garage floor (perhaps with a donation) is the first plan.

                          If that isn't happening, then dragging it up while still on the skid is next. If you can put pipe rollers under the skid, and keep feeding them in the front as it moves, so much the better.

                          I'd rate pushing it uphill on wheels as the least desirable. You have to get wheels under it, you have to push it up, and you have to get the wheels out again. Seems like un-needed trouble.
                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Texasbowhunter View Post
                            When I did mine I rented a motorcycle trailer...
                            Loaded it in MC trailer and backer trailer to garage...
                            From there I used a engine hoist to remove from trailer to spot where it was going to sit...
                            My Driveway seems to be on a bit more slope then yours...
                            Best of luck with this endeavor but to tell the truth if the guy can unload and move the units to garage for a small nominal fee for you then that would be the best route to go...Money in his pocket would be a 6 pack or dinner for him for the next few days...
                            Paul
                            This sounds less stressful than any of the other solutions UHaul rents flatbed (or motorcycle) trailers for $15/day and 2 ton engine lifts are under $200.

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                            • #29
                              500 pounds is just two big guys. Easy to spread that out over a 4x8 sheet of plywood for minimal ground pressure. machine should be in some kind of crate, pallet. Get it onto a sheet of plywood and secure a rope to the sheet. Simple low cost come-along from somewhere like harbor freight and winch the thing up the hill. Sure, it's going to take a bit of time but life is a journey anyways. Do you have a small engine crane? If so you could sling the box onto the crane legs (keep the cg low) and wheel the unit up the hill instead of using the wood. Small engine cranes are real handy when setting up a small mill.

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                              • #30
                                Forget plywood hard to hold and lift. A long 2x4 over 2 or 4 shoulder far easier..plus it moves less slung than on s flat sheet..

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