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Moving new machine from street to garage

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  • #31
    If it is in a crate, or on a skid, no need for the plywood. Just loop a strap around the crate or skid and drag it up with a winch or come-along.

    Originally posted by 754 View Post
    Forget plywood hard to hold and lift. A long 2x4 over 2 or 4 shoulder far easier..plus it moves less slung than on s flat sheet..
    The plywood was described as the skid on which the machine was to be winched up...... not in any way carrying it.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

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    • #32
      Harbor freight hydraulic lift cart. Something like $200 and I have used it to move a bench top mill and a lathe into the garage with just my GF helping. It's indispensable from that point on I've used it 100 times over

      . Click image for larger version

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      • #33
        pair of 2x4 as skids and your choice of tractive force: 10 ordinary nerds, one horse, your car, hand- or electric winch. Skids dont run away unlike eollers and wheels..(unless its winter and your driveway is covered with polished ice)
        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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        • #34
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          If it is in a crate, or on a skid, no need for the plywood. Just loop a strap around the crate or skid and drag it up with a winch or come-along.

          The plywood was described as the skid on which the machine was to be winched up...... not in any way carrying it.
          I would do this in a heartbeat. Tie off a come-along on the back wall of the garage, find the midpoint of balance, and crank it uphill and in, a bit at a time. No rollers or anything needed, it's not that heavy. When I last moved house, that is exactly how I got my entire shop out of the basement.
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #35
            You could push it with your car, an old tire between the bumper and the crate would help.

            Jon
            SW Mi

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            • #36
              I have put 5 500 lb to 900 lb machines in my shop & several out to my sons shop with wheeled dollys from Northern tool and a engine lift from Sunbelt Rentals. Gang up the dollys as needed bolted together with 2X6 lumber they adapt to machine weight and configuration. Engine lift is very flexible on and off the dollys & into final position. Rental very reasonable. Up the Incline depends, block and tackle winch etc, or towed with a chain on a trailer hitch. Parked car or truck with a hitch ball makes a good anchor point for your tackle if you go that way . Make sure you have blocking available to stop rolling back down the incline..

              Boats

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              • #37
                Hi again. Here's hoping that all the advice has proved interesting and useful to our original poster, and others.
                it certainly shows that, as usual, there are many good alternative ways to do a given task.
                Regards David Powell.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                  If it is in a crate, or on a skid, no need for the plywood. Just loop a strap around the crate or skid and drag it up with a winch or come-along.



                  The plywood was described as the skid on which the machine was to be winched up...... not in any way carrying it.
                  Yes. I include the plywood to spread the load out if it's a soft driveway surface. (some of us remain too familiar with mud) No need on smooth concrete or pavement

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                  • #39
                    Might be time to create a system for this, and future uses. Two parts basically, a suitable winch which could hook into the floor back a ways so you could drag something all the way into the shop, and a wheeled platform which you'd have some kind of control over, like brakes and some steering. This would obviously be powered from ac back in your shop, and you'd need control from your location at the bottom of the driveway. Anything you can load onto the platform can be winched up, or brought down to the bottom of the driveway. Even a 1000 lb winch is large enough to this task, and this should not be an expensive item to find- though it probably needs to be self-locking.

                    Now the notion of a battery electric mini fork lift comes in. I'm starting to get intrigued now-

                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #40
                      elf, go and rent an engine hoist, set the crate down on the bottom rails and push it up your driveway, into your shop and lift the machine up onto your platform or bench, set down and have a cold one. You might want a helper so buy two cold ones.πŸ˜…
                      Last edited by lugnut; 09-16-2021, 02:51 AM.
                      _____________________________________________

                      I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                      Oregon Coast

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                      • #41
                        I would use a furniture dolly with a piece of plywood screwed to the top. HF has several options in the $10.00 to $15.00 range.

                        Search Results For "Furniture Dolly" (harborfreight.com)

                        They also have hand trucks and appliance trucks that could handle the job. I have several of their furniture dollies that i regularly use to move small equipment (500 lbs. to 700 lbs. around the shop. I also have a 1,000 lb. hand truck (from the local Farm & Fleet) and a 1,200 lb. appliance dolly (from Sears). Any of them can be used for something in that weight range. I have a piece of plywood permanently screwed to one of the larger dollies to make things easier. I also occasionally put a piece of plywood on the base of the larger hand truck to get more surface area to carry a heavy load.

                        I have used these dollies and hand trucks to move nearly 2 dozen pieces of machinery from the drive to the basement shop. Some machines had to be partially disassembled to get them through the doors, but the weight was not a problem. The machines moved include a Sheldon 13" lathe (1650 lbs.), a Seneca Falls 10" lathe (750 lbs.), a Startrite H175 horizontal bandsaw (300 lbs.), a Sanford MG surface grinder (600 lbs.), etc., etc. All the machines were moved by myself (5' 8" and 200 lbs.) using one or more of the previously mentioned dollies and/or trucks. They came up the 140 ft. drive, through the garage, up 1 step and through the kitchen, down the stairs turning 90* into the shop.

                        I would nix the hydraulic table though. I have both a 500 lb. model and a 1,000 lb. model. The smaller one weighs about 90 lbs. and the larger is close to 200 lbs. They are a beast to push up a hill and don't like the seams between the concrete slabs.
                        Last edited by projectnut; 09-16-2021, 08:38 AM.

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                        • #42
                          and then there is the pipe rollers, or log rollers, as the Egyptians moved the pyramids.
                          I made myself some skates and a johnson bar, very handy

                          ​​​​​​https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...B&gclsrc=aw.ds


                          ​​​​​​https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...3892_200673892

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                          • #43
                            500 pounds is - or should be - a piece of cake. Several caveats, though, even with such a light machine.

                            With anything tall and top heavy - lathes, drill presses, etc. - tipping is a big danger. Don’t rely on a pallet to which it may be screwed to prevent tipping. Timbers to which the machine is bolted or lagged are much better. As wide as will fit through your doorway.

                            Where slopes are involved, skids are better than wheels or rollers.

                            For chains, cables or straps, all connections must be secure. Don’t rely, for instance, on a strap end placed in a simple chain hook. When the pressure is off, the strap may slip off. Safety hooks with keepers are much safer. Inspect all connections constantly. This, from experience - bad experience.

                            Before you do anything, think. Then think again.

                            Don’t do it alone.

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                            • #44
                              Just a question about hydraulic table , can it slip out while sliding a machine off of it.
                              i mean sliding it and all of a sudden weight is all on one end when machine m might not be far enough on its bench to stay there.

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                              • #45
                                ---My driveway is about the same way---cement with a down hill slope back down into the cement pad at rear of the house and in front of the shop
                                ---I bought a new Miller DX 250 Welder that was a pretty good sized package---and I got the trucker driver to let me back up my El Camino to his tail gate---lowered his tail gate and slid in onto my tailgate and slid it back into the bed a little ways
                                ---he drove away---and I backed it down into the front of my shop where I happened to already have a swing arm hoist outside for loading engines and set it down on a 4 wheeled dolly and rolled it inside
                                ---the shipping weight was 498# and it was easy to hoist up because it has a hoist hook right in the center of the welder top sticking out of the box





                                Last edited by bill jones; 09-16-2021, 03:00 PM.

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