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Moving new machine from street to garage

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  • ken
    replied
    roll back wreckers work well for this type of move done this more than one time on 3000 to 5000 lbs machines ken

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  • darryl
    replied
    A trailer without wheels? I guess you'd call that a U-Skid

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    .......... I wouldn't worry too much about a UHaul trailer without wheels, I'm sure the UHaul skids will work fine.
    Was thinking the price was so low that the question did sort of occur to me......

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Jack up one side of the drive wheels on your vehicle while at the top of your driveway, and chock the other wheels. Remove wheel, remove tire from rim and reinstall rim. Tie rope around rim. Get delivery guy to set machine on moving dolly down on the street. Tie other end of rope to moving dolly.....

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  • elf
    replied
    All of the solutions require lifting it to set on its base. The delivery company will put it on the trailer or in the pickup at their transfer site. I wouldn't worry too much about a UHaul trailer without wheels, I'm sure the UHaul skids will work fine.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    With a rental trailer costing about 5 times less than a sheet of plywood, less than a furniture dolly, and less than pipe rollers, I think it's safe to say, it will be the method I use. I could also have it put in my pickup, but the tonneau cover blocks the tie down rails
    It still has to get up into that cheap trailer, and down out of it. But, you can back the trailer up the 1 in 6 slope and deposit the machine on the garage floor, assuming you can get it out.

    Lotsa solutions that cost a bundle showing up here...

    Does the trailer at $5 come with wheels?

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  • elf
    replied
    With a rental trailer costing about 5 times less than a sheet of plywood, less than a furniture dolly, and less than pipe rollers, I think it's safe to say, it will be the method I use. I could also have it put in my pickup, but the tonneau cover blocks the tie down rails

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  • psomero
    replied
    In response to OP: I am a huge fan of pipe rollers. Assuming your ground/floor conditions are conducive to it, 500lb will let you get away with 3/4" SCH80 gray CPVC conduit from the big box store. Put the machine on a skid made of 1/2" ply and 2x4's and roll the sucker. You can use a burke bar to lift a corner to get a roller in, and you can also use it to nudge the whole works along if it gets sticky. I like to cut some wood chocks that are about 1/8"-1/4" taller than the PVC pipe so you can toss one under each corner and stop the rolling if you need to adjust or get re-situated.

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  • psomero
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave94Lightning View Post
    Harbor freight hydraulic lift cart. Something like $200 and I have used it to move a bench top mill and a lathe into the garage with just my GF helping. It's indispensable from that point on I've used it 100 times over

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    I have used one of these with great success as well. I'd be leery of the lift/hold capability on a HF unit, though.

    The person I bought my G0759 mill from had the uline version of that guy, rated to maybe 660lb. I was able to lift the machine up off the floor in an office, wheel it through a double wide commercial door, out into the parking lot, into the back of the pickup, drive across town, slide the machine back onto the lift and shimmy it onto the new mill cabinet I had built at home for the machine.

    Hardest part by far was folding up the lift table and getting it into the back of the truck! They're heavy!

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Don't overthink it, Elf!

    500 lbs. isn't bad at all. Where are you located? Might be some of us nearby that could lend a hand or at least let you borrow some hoists / pallet jacks to make the job easier.

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  • jmm03
    replied
    out of curiosity, do you have a picture of your driveway? Now that everyone and their cousins have weighed in on how to move the machine I am wondering how you finally did it... Jim

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  • tryfred
    replied
    We drilled a 1” hole into the concrete floor as there were no studs/wall to anchor to. Inserted a piece of 1” round stock… a trailer winch worked fine…as would a chain fall /come-along, even a ratchet strap would do the job at 500lbs. YMMV…
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  • swarfjunky
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Not if it is 1 in 6, which 5 feet in 30 would be. It's about a 9.5 degree angle though.
    Oops, my bad...meant to say angle.

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  • Cheap Jon
    replied
    Check around the neighborhood for someone with a front end loader. 500 lbs. is not that much, if you can get some help tilt it up on edge and slide a HF 4 caster dolly under it, and push it up the drive. Been some good ideas posted, and some overly complicated.

    Jon
    SW Mi

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  • ulav8r
    replied
    I have a 2500 lb HF winch, 12 V with remote. It will drag a 18 inch diameter green(heavy) pine log onto a trailer. 50 feet of cable and a rope or chain to extend the length when needed. A 3/8 inch dyneema rope was sufficient to break the cable on the 7th or 8th use, so I replaced the 5/32" cable with a 3/16" cable. The remote has enough range to use at the end of the cable. The remote uses a momentary switch so it is easy to stop pulling instantly.

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