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Swingweighting golf clubs (with shop built tools)

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  • Swingweighting golf clubs (with shop built tools)

    Figured some here might find this interesting. Just another way we all use our shops.

    Short story...A couple months back I took my 16yo Nephew golfing and it sparked an interest in him. Problem is that he's 6'5" and still growing, and clubs for tall people don't grow on retail shelves. I had an extra set I wasn't using, and he took a liking to them, so I told him I'd extend them for him. That's when I fell down the rabbit hole and learned a bunch of stuff I didn't know....

    Extending clubs changes the "swing weight" of the club, or the "heft" if you will. It makes the head feel much heavier, so you must counterweight the handle (unless you like swinging an axe). I could have just taken the set to a local guy paid him a $100-150 to get them extended and balanced, but like any home shop guy why spend money when I can spend time. So I set off to build a swingweight scale, and a mold to cast my own counterweights.

    I posted this in the shop made tools thread, but here it is again anyway.

    ​​This is a copy of Dave Tutelman's design with a few changes to suit material I had on hand. All the design and engineering info can be found here if you're interested. he can explain it much better than I can. https://www.tutelman.com/golf/measur...eightScale.php

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    Checking one of my clubs
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    The 300 means it's the D scale, and the 36g is 3.6, so this club is D3.6.
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  • #2
    Next up is the mold I made to cast the weights. It was pretty easy to cast directly on my scale and get the weights almost bang on so no trimming was needed. Just tare the scale before you pour and try to hit the hole with a steady stream... think I had 3 that were good at 23g and didn't need any trimming. The rest I tried to over pour so I could trim back to size. More than A few went back in the pot....

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    Unsure of the sizing I'd end up with I created each cavity 0.005" progressively smaller than nominal (0.580") id of the shaft. Turns out -0.015" was a perfect fit. I did a bunch of pours to heat the mold up, and work on my technique (still didn't really get great pours), then poured all the weights I needed from the one cavity. They're not perfect, but they'll work. The rods are tapered so a slight rap on the table was all that was needed to free the castings.
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    As you can see the slug has a little lip to keep it from sliding down the shaft even though it is epoxied in there.
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    • #3
      ​ ​
      300 means it's "D scale" and the 41g reads as 4.1. So this club is a d4.1. I was shooting for D4 across the board, and got them all within a couple decimal places. They're closer than my set of Mizunos are to each other ​​​​​.
      ​​​​​​

      All glued in, and ready for grips tonight. Then they're off across the province to some anxious awaiting hands. He lives a couple hours away, so hopefully I'll be able to deliver them, and share a round with him before the snow flies.
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      • #4
        Next on the list this winter is to design/build a loft/lie checking and bending machine. It's a couple notches down the project list, but I'm slowly getting through the backlog.

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        • #5
          that is really cool, particularly the use of the scales. Neat work and exactly the reason why we have home shops That's what I told my wife when I fixed her Roomba the other day!

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          • #6
            That's cool. I'm in process of getting my swing looked at with hopes of being fitted (correctly) for new irons. Injury is going to prevent it from happening this season. I was aware of swing weighting but not all that goes into it. One of my bucket list items is to design my own putter head. Can't be worse than how I putt now and then I'll be able to blame the club....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
              that is really cool, particularly the use of the scales. Neat work and exactly the reason why we have home shops That's what I told my wife when I fixed her Roomba the other day!
              Thanks. Dave Tutelman did all the heavy lifting to figure out that design to use a gram scale. I just copied him . Most scales use a sliding weight like a balance beam and read directly (and cost $300). Luckily I've made and fixed enough stuff for the Wife over the years she see's the value in having the shop. She even helped me do the weighting last night and was handing me clubs after she got home from work.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gzig5 View Post
                That's cool. I'm in process of getting my swing looked at with hopes of being fitted (correctly) for new irons. Injury is going to prevent it from happening this season. I was aware of swing weighting but not all that goes into it. One of my bucket list items is to design my own putter head. Can't be worse than how I putt now and then I'll be able to blame the club....
                Same here. I'd heard/read about it, but didn't know all that much about it until I started looking into building this set. I got back into golf last year after a long hiatus, and fell in love with the game again (played a lot as a teen). I got "fit" for clubs back in about 2001/2, and they were the worst clubs I've ever played. Never did get on with them, and gave them away a few years back. I want to learn a lot more about the process before I plunk my money down again. There is so much more info out there now than back then it's amazing.

                I pieced together a full bag of Mizuno's over the past year through kijiji/ebay/global golf, and have been swapping driver shafts, etc to dial them in. I want to break 80 with what I've got before I consider getting fit as I know the clubs are capable it's me that is the weak link. I shot 85 a couple rounds ago, and posted a 38 front the round after, but followed it with a 49 back lol. Couldn't break 90 all last year and only posted 2 scores over 90 so far so I'm heading in the right direction I think .

                If you want to make your own putter, I'd say go for it. I also made my own at the start of the year, and was pursuing a patent on some design aspects (the brazed bumpers/counterweight), but decided to scrap that plan after wasting way too much time researching it and the whole process. I've got a couple other designs and ideas I want to make this fall/winter when I can't golf anymore. I'll post those builds when I get to them. Putting was never my strong suit, but since switching to my own I'm down around 30 putts per round, and it's been the one thing I can actually count on. Something very satisfactory about draining a long one with a putter you made yourself. Just wish I could put the rest of the round together....

                This was meant as a quick prototype. It's face balanced, and a bit handle heavy (light head). Feels like a natural extension of my arms. I've got 16 rounds on it now and am about ready to make it's replacement with a couple changes. I also want to forge my own wedges someday too. Yes I'm a sick man with no cure lol.



                Here it is before black oxide treatment. That copper was tig brazed on the back bead by bead, then cnc machined and blended on a scotchbright wheel. Yes it took a while lol. I want to make a few more changes to this design, then test the custom made putter market with this blade and a cast mallet I came up with. I need to up my metal finishing/polishing game first though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                  That's what I told my wife when I fixed her Roomba the other day!
                  Let's keep it clean, fella.

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