Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shaft Build up ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Shaft Build up ?

    I made a Jackshaft for a Friend. He races outlaw snowmobiles. He sent a Drawing, but..yes ..the one diameter given on his Drawing was .050 smaller than it should of been. Was a lot of time making this part as it had splines and a thread and various diameters. Now I was musing over building up the shaft with some Belzona epoxy? The shaft hold a clutch on the Shafts surface. Do you Gentlemen think it would stand up? I would machine it down to a proper fit afterwards for a perfect no slop fit? ??? Thanx

  • #2
    Can you, without unnecessarily weakening the shaft, reduce the diameter a bit further - then shrink fit (or Locktite, etc) on an appropriate sleeve?
    Location: North Central Texas

    Comment


    • #3
      Id probably build it up with braze or something. I would not trust epoxy, especially that thin.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Joel View Post
        Can you, without unnecessarily weakening the shaft, reduce the diameter a bit further - then shrink fit (or Locktite, etc) on an appropriate sleeve?
        If this is not possible or a braze or weld buildup is not an option, can you sleeve the clutch housing where it rides on the shaft?
        A .025" layer of epoxy doesn't sound too stable.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Location: British Columbia

        Comment


        • #5
          I've used this companies products for spray weld / shaft build up. https://www.castolin.com/en-US

          JL...................

          Comment


          • #6
            Chuck it in the scrap and start over.
            Is it heat treated? How do you know it will handle the torque ?
            -D
            DZER

            Comment


            • #7
              10 years ago I made many molds for the Belzona distributor in NJ.
              All of the molds worked as none were ever rejected, however I never saw any of the repaired parts when finished and in use so have no knowledge if it works.
              At the time Belzona products were very expensive by hobby standards.

              Molds like so, I may have actually made this mold but there is no way to confirm this of course.
              https://blog.belzona.com/worn-shaft-repair/
              Last edited by Bented; 09-20-2021, 07:27 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm so hesitant to do jobs for this reason. People are so lazy. They'll happily spend 20+ hours of your time making a part, but won't take 10 minutes to properly measure it. It has certainly happened to me. Any time I do one, I do my own investigative work to make sure I don't waste my time. I'd probably have to tell him the first one was free, the second one is paid.
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                Comment


                • #9
                  Metal butcher and Doozer both have the correct answer IMHO. I would scrap it and make a new one. Probably out of a Harbor Freight crow bar. And your buddy owes you a LOT of paid business from his racing buddies in the future.
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would not use an epoxy for the repair unless it's constrained completely for the entirety of the outside diameter by a bearing race or similar solid surface. Otherwise it's probably not going to hold up. The case of a two-stroke is a pretty severe environment. You could try the braze but that may warp the shaft and possibly ruin any heat treatment. Probably gonna be a remake.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      some friend.

                      j/j, maybe he's earned that and more.

                      I'd scrap it if I wanted to do it properly. I just did a did a drill press spindle (the crap ones that have a make jacobs taper) for work. did a mig weld build up, weld, turn grind and it worked perfectly, but for a high performance part that seems a little shade tree'ish.
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'd try to silicon bronze tig/mig braze it up before I tossed it and started over. AL bronze would probably be even better. It might not have as long of a service life as a solid steel one, but I doubt it will catastrophically fail on him.

                        I've also found with jobs like this there is never any winner. Most people just have NO idea the amount of time it actually takes to make stuff from scratch. They think everything just magically grows on trees in the amazon. From harvest to table in 2 days or less.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          would a speedy sleeve work for this?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                            I'd try to silicon bronze tig/mig braze it up before I tossed it and started over. AL bronze would probably be even better. It might not have as long of a service life as a solid steel one, but I doubt it will catastrophically fail on him.

                            I've also found with jobs like this there is never any winner. Most people just have NO idea the amount of time it actually takes to make stuff from scratch. They think everything just magically grows on trees in the amazon. From harvest to table in 2 days or less.
                            Not only that but when you quote a price for a one-off they are simply dumbfounded!

                            Then they will claim that something very similar is on sale at the local piggly-wigglely for a whole lot less.
                            Great I tell them, have me build 25,000 units and each one will be a whole lot cheaper than of me pulling one out of my hat.
                            One of the main reasons that I'm getting a whole lot more selective on who I do work for.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Willy View Post
                              One of the main reasons that I'm getting a whole lot more selective on who I do work for.
                              I just went down that road this past weekend......My list is small....and shrinking. For those not on it, my price is high. Saying no to helping somebody out has always been hard for me, but I've come to realize that there are far too many time vampires out there that will use and abuse your good will.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X