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  • Carbide kitchen knife

    I'm curious why I don't see any carbide kitchen knives. I have a bunch of 1/16" thick X 4 X 1/2" carbide blades that are used for flocking carpet and I'm thinking of brazing a couple to some mild steel stock. Any drawbacks that can be seen? Specifically I'll be replicating my Bubba Blade that I use to clean fish.
    Thanks

  • #2
    I once saw a knife blade made of a thin plate of very hard steel laminated between two pieces of stainless. The steel hard edge could be seen on the back of the blade and on the cutting edge.
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

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    • #3
      Originally posted by challenger View Post
      I'm curious why I don't see any carbide kitchen knives. I have a bunch of 1/16" thick X 4 X 1/2" carbide blades that are used for flocking carpet and I'm thinking of brazing a couple to some mild steel stock. Any drawbacks that can be seen? Specifically I'll be replicating my Bubba Blade that I use to clean fish.
      Thanks
      I think the reason you don't see carbide kitchen knives is that they are called ceramic knives. Very sharp, hold the edge a long time, are very difficult to resharpen. I use 600 grit diamond to start the sharpening, then to 1000 and finally to 1500 grit. Still not quite as sharp as when new.

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      • #4
        There have been knives made from a glass material also. They can be very sharp, although maybe not quite as sharp as a cleaved obsidian knife. Those can be insanely sharp, but not very straight......
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

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        • #5
          Apparently they are available, no personal experience with them. I've tried the ceramic knives and have not been impressed with them.They seemed to make a big splash in the market a few years ago but I'm seeing less of them on the market lately.
          Hopefully these are a step above those types of blades.

          https://usa.sandrinknives.com/
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

          Location: British Columbia

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

            I think the reason you don't see carbide kitchen knives is that they are called ceramic knives. Very sharp, hold the edge a long time, are very difficult to resharpen. I use 600 grit diamond to start the sharpening, then to 1000 and finally to 1500 grit. Still not quite as sharp as when new.
            Well two different materials, I don't know if ceramic is considered a carcinogen or not but know carbide is, But Willy's link proves that it must not be a factor for food preparation as they do indeed have them as an option...

            so maybe carbide is safe until ground into a fine dust...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

              I think the reason you don't see carbide kitchen knives is that they are called ceramic knives. Very sharp, hold the edge a long time, are very difficult to resharpen. I use 600 grit diamond to start the sharpening, then to 1000 and finally to 1500 grit. Still not quite as sharp as when new.
              Carbide and ceramic are far from the same thing and I've never heard of one being "called" another????

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              • #8
                Originally posted by challenger View Post

                Carbide and ceramic are far from the same thing and I've never heard of one being "called" another????
                Kyocera begs to differ with that. Silicon Carbide is a particular type of ceramic according to them.
                https://global.kyocera.com/prdct/fc/...saApFkEALw_wcB

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                • #9
                  I'd be thinking that its a pretty acute cutting edge and carbide is more brittle than steel.
                  Last edited by Mcgyver; 09-22-2021, 04:08 PM.
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RMinMN View Post

                    Kyocera begs to differ with that. Silicon Carbide is a particular type of ceramic according to them.
                    https://global.kyocera.com/prdct/fc/...saApFkEALw_wcB
                    Yes but "ceramic" knives are not made from silicon carbide but from zirconium dioxide, better known as zirconia.

                    This, also from Kyocera.



                    Kyocera's ceramic knives are incredibly unique due to their high-quality, innovative material and design.

                    The material is an ultra-light, non-corrosive, high-tech zirconia used in space and underwater exploration.
                    ................................................
                    .......................



                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #11
                      Haven't we dispelled the old wives tales that Carbide can't hold a sharp edge? Modern micrograin Carbide has replaced much of the HSS cutters in the home shop, or in the very least, COULD replace it,,, My CCGT inserts are a really good example. Only reason I have to use HSS anymore is if I want to make a custom form tool.

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                      • #12
                        Way too brittle for general-purpose use, at least at the edge geometries that youd want for something like a kitchen knife. Think of how easy it is to chip out a polished carbide insert, then think about how much easier it would be to do that with an even finer edge

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
                          Way too brittle for general-purpose use, at least at the edge geometries that youd want for something like a kitchen knife. Think of how easy it is to chip out a polished carbide insert, then think about how much easier it would be to do that with an even finer edge
                          Apparently not according to the manufacturer, but at their price point I very much doubt that I'll find out personally.
                          There are a number of videos demonstrating their toughness.

                          This appears to me to be a new technology, well to me at least, as I like others have known most machining grade carbide to be brittle, although there are hard and brittle grades and tough grades.
                          Although I have in the past used snow plow blades on highways maintenance trucks that used carbide inserts that stood up way way longer than abrasion resistant steel blades, unbelievably longer!
                          Also have seen carbide used in highways milling machines used for reclaiming old roadways as material for new asphalt, tough stuff to be sure.

                          Perhaps this is a grade that leans way over into the tough grade. They are after all designed to cut food and not metal so hardness can be scaled way back.
                          Although I did have a steak a while back that would have been a very compelling test.


                          This quote from the link I left previously:

                          Our Flexible Tungsten Carbide Blades will stay sharp longer than any other knife due to the unique properties of the blade material. Our proprietary technology allows us to create knives that are a hardness of 71 HRC while still remaining flexible and not brittle. Don’t believe us? Watch how our original TCK holds up against other knives in a head to head cutting contest. Nothing lasts forever, but this comes close!
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                          Location: British Columbia

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                          • #14
                            What the heck. I will make a blade with the carbide knives I have and see how it works. Not a think to lose and it won't cost me anything more than my time. I'd LOVE a blade that I never have to sharpen.

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                            • #15
                              Three or four years ago I bought a small knife for kitchen use from Memphis Net and Twine, which as you might imagine caters to the fishing business. It's a plain jane carbon steel blade and equally plain hardwood handle. That is the best knife I've ever used ...bar none!! It is so wickedly sharp I can't count the times I've cut myself with it; though after a while I learned to give it more respect than usual.
                              They sell two different brands: Dexter, and Russell. Though I think one bought the other out some years back, and they're now just one company. I doubt that they're aimed at the consumer market, but rather such activities as meat and fishing, etc.

                              Still haven't needed to sharpen that knife
                              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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