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Need to remove 5MT arbor from Jacobs 20N SuperChuck

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  • macona
    replied
    No loctite, you dont need it. Heat the chuck up in an oven and drop it on the arbor and give the arbor a whack with a dead blow. Once it cools its not going to come off. Some people say put the arbor in the freezer but you can get condensation on the arbor before assembling which could potentially cause rust in the taper.

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Umm the OP got it separated a few days ago----
    Good Job Richard, you did well. JR

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Umm the OP got it separated a few days ago----

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by aribert View Post
    I bought a Jacobs 20N (3/8 to 1 inch capacity, a substantial drill chuck) SuperChuck at auction a while back. The chuck came with a 5MT arbor.
    Its a big azzed arbbor. Take a chisle to the mating point while holing the now dead arbor in a big vice. Take a nice 2lbs hammer and steel chisle to go to work lightly one the mating point of the arbor and chuck. Tap, tap tap. Yeah, do it for five minutes. She will pop off.

    Time and pacientes..

    See, you can brut force something into fix or fail. Itsbetter to start with tap, tap, tp .. Just try it. Flat chisle, tap tap tap lightly arond the joint. Dont mar the holder. Jus

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  • SLK001
    replied
    Originally posted by aribert View Post
    ...and then use a red Loctite when I press the new 4MT arbor into the chuck body.
    Don't use anything in the socket. The taper is strong enough that is isn't needed. Anyway, all the Loctite will do is add to your runout.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Ditto! "Another one bites the dust!"



    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    very cool, glad it worked out well!

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Well done! I can't believe somebody spun that. Must not have been seat well.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Glad you succeeded and didn't resort to some caveman technique that would have destroyed a MT5 arbor.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    very cool, glad it worked out well!

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  • aribert
    replied
    I found a bit of time yesterday afternoon to get back at removing the 5MT arbor from the drill chuck. I decided that if I was going to apply heat, that it would likely affect the lube in the chuck so I might as well dismantle the chuck first so that I could apply the heat directly to the chuck body outside of the taper in the body. First I drilled the hole in the chuck body a bit larger and 1/4 in deep into the arbor. I put on my hearing protection, placed some leather shot bags at the base of the press and then put the arbor/chuck body back into the press, applied a "modest" amount of force and began to heat the body of the chuck. Took a couple of minutes for the bang to occur. There is a band of galling, about 1/8 inch wide on both the arbor and the chuck body. I think I'll go into the chuck body with a tiny grinding stone to relieve the surface of the chuck taper at the galling band and then use a red Loctite when I press the new 4MT arbor into the chuck body.

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  • mickeyf
    replied
    Two days of effort with large sledge hammers, aerosol penetrating fluids by the case, and acetylene heat, yielded no results...no movement. I had heard about using a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone, so as a last resort at the end of second day, we put a bunch of that mixture where it was stuck. Next morning we checked and the shaft was settled to the floor and slid out easily. We were just dumbfounded and made us believers.
    Of course, you'd done a couple of days of softening up first, which might have made a difference. Also an overly pressed in taper is not the same as an overly pressed in straight displacement fit which is not the same as "rusted in place". Not to say that might not be a great mix, and I'll probably try it when it looks appropriate, merely that all stuck things are not stuck the same way, and the workable solution will need to take that into account.

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  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    popped off another arbor this morning, a JT4/MT4 from a 3/4" chuck. Same as all the others, drilled the chuck out to take a 3/8" pin, lightly closed the jaws on the pin, put the chuck in a thick wall piece of pipe and pressed it out with my 10T press. Took about 5 minutes. Now done a 14N, 18N and this LFA chuck successfully. Only the first 14N I did needed the arbor cut off and drilled out, but it was a nasty stub arbor anyway.

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  • Dan Krager
    replied
    Here's what works for me on on difficult projects. One particularly noteworthy project was a large rotary ditch digger had developed bad bearings on the main impeller shaft. It was 36" long and 3" in diameter completely enclosed in a tube with large bearings at top and bottom. Two days of effort with large sledge hammers, aerosol penetrating fluids by the case, and acetylene heat, yielded no results...no movement. I had heard about using a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone, so as a last resort at the end of second day, we put a bunch of that mixture where it was stuck. Next morning we checked and the shaft was settled to the floor and slid out easily. We were just dumbfounded and made us believers. I keep that mixture (it's not a solution so you have to mix it like a rattlecan) in a spray bottle that will withstand the acetone and use it on difficult tightly stuck and rusted stuff. Most often, it works without any heat which is a good thing because it's extremely flammable.

    DanK

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  • ken
    replied
    I have done this a few times cut the arbor off put the chuck in the lathe dill and tap what's left of the arbor cut a pace of pipe and make a thick washer use a stud or bolt and use your impact gun and they pop right out if you want to keep arbor weld a bolt to the end do the same with the pipe and washer I have found that the impact gun works better than the press ken

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  • CPeter
    replied
    Some of this may seem obvious, so forgive me for writing it. Drill out the center hole to ½". Make a press plate from heavy steel with a hole that the arbor just fits through. Use that to support the check when pressing it. Use a grade 8 bolt to push the arbor out. It should just stick out of the chuck jaws a little when they are loosely closed against the bolt. Support the press plate squarely in the press. Now apply some heat around the base of the chuck, not on the sleeve and put the pressure to it. As was stated several times, have a bucket with something soft to catch the arbor. This method is approved and recommended by Jacobs.

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