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. .? FUNCTION OF HOLES in spacer blocks like 1 2 3 blocks..?

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  • #16
    Imo these were made at least 40 years ago. And nicely done. I would like to have a few tapped holes available, butcountersunk be nice , then you can add a block or make an ELL shape. Also bolt on spacer or shim when setting up a small angled piece for short run. I figure he made the toolbox too..
    i got them from a fellow that helps older people clear out their homes when thy go off to the pasture aka Nursing Home, he helps them by taking things to various place for reuse or sale.
    so generally no family coming to help sort of deal.
    SO HE tells me he has a box , but its wood.. and I geg all exciting thinking maybe a Gerstner or other classic.. we live in a wooden machinist box desrt... i dont think I have come across more than 3 here in the last 35 years. So its homebuilt from plywood i think, and its not bad , but not a Gerstner or classic.
    i think it was same time .. he said he had some blocks that were like alternate stripes of metal , for some strange reason. Had the Surface grinder by then and got real excited.. H commented .Your eyes sure it up when I mentioned those blocks.. lol. Will get a few more pics of that haul. He had a name stamp logo, about size of a fingernail.. a couple pieces were stamped.
    Last edited by 754; 09-26-2021, 08:44 PM.

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    • #17
      Wasn't there a post on here a year ago pointing to a video that tediously showed how to make smaller barrel nuts that then allowed the corresponding bolt, being thinner, to work at an angle to the face. There was some point to that being angled that I can't remember. It was one of those videos that took 30 minutes to show 15 seconds of real content.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Baz View Post
        It was one of those videos that took 30 minutes to show 15 seconds of real content.
        well that really narrows it down!
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #19
          10-24 bolts in a 5/16 " hole with just a washer on each in 2 different places... would swivel enough to clamp a small rod firmly.... Great idea..

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

            1) give apprentices practice at drilling
            2) provide a place for dirt and chips to hide so they can mess up a part swap.
            3) a gimmick for late night infomercials....you know, 15 minutes of droning on bolting them together to make useful things....but you know you never will
            4) reduce shipping costs
            5) the stores are closed you need an emergency give for wife - tell her its a dried flower arrangement vase.
            6) less surface to grind, save wear and tear on grinding wheels
            7) Annoy Doozer
            Yer Killin me. Plese stop JR


            Edit: "3) a gimmick for late night infomercials....you know, 15 minutes of droning on bolting them together to make useful things....but you know you never will..... "


            Best line yet..I have been down that road, no kidding.. JR
            Last edited by JRouche; 09-27-2021, 03:24 AM.

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            • #21
              Maybe you don't need to worry...... Do you ever actually USE 1 2 3 blocks?

              I think I have two sets. Both came in toolboxes. I used one block years ago when I wanted to get an import DP vise (which came with a machine) flattened on the bottom. I bolted the block down, then clamped the vise upsy down to it so the bottom could be skimmed..

              I don't think I have used either set since. Just never had a reason. If I need angle blocks, I already have angles to use, so nothing there. and they are too large and unhandy for use as spacers, etc in most cases.

              I also have some 1 x 1 x 2 blocks, and those I have used several times to hold work up off the machine table, etc. They are a handy size. If you have a spare 123 block, slicing it into smaller pieces might make it more useful.....
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

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              • #22
                Stacking blocks? You dont want threads. I like them. Send them my way, postage paid. JR

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                • #23
                  Not really related, but...
                  My friend Mike gave me a set of 123 blocks that he made as an apprenticeship project
                  when he started working at the Ford plant in Buffalo. Made to the Brown and Sharpe
                  pattern, with thru holes and tapped holes. Well I took them to work one day and had
                  QC measure them on the CMM. Turns out they are perfect to the 1 and 2 and 3"
                  dimensions to less than a tenth of a thou. I don't think he lapped them, just off
                  the surface grinder. I don't remember the squareness geometry numbers, but it was
                  pretty good. He is in tool and die repair, and I am surprised he did not want to keep
                  them, but I treasure them, as it was a wonderful gift. I actually only use them for
                  precision setups and as micrometer standards for my 1 to 6" set of mics. I have a
                  rough and tumble set for general shop work that I use for non-critical stuff, because
                  they have been re-ground a few times, and not the original dimensions. This set
                  of 123 blocks was actually given to me when my uncle Don passed away. He also
                  had work in the Ford plant. He retired after 38 years as a die maker. I also have from
                  my uncle Don, a 6x6x6" 90° angle plate, with tapped holes and slots. It was made from
                  pickled hot roll plate and of welded construction. I also treasure it. You can tell the welds
                  are AC stick rod. Pretty typical of back in the day when it was made. Welds look nice
                  and show the skill that went into making it.


                  --Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #24
                    Ideally there should be tapped holes and clearance holes in the blocks. Surburban tool is the only source I know of doing this. Suburban isn't cheap.
                    • B-123-H11-M has drilled, counter-bored & tapped holes to allow screw mounting and conversion into angle plates & other precision set-ups.
                    • B-123-H23M, B-234-H23-M & B-246-H23-M have tapped holes & matchhing clearance to allow screw mounting and conversion into angle plates & other precision set-ups.

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                    • #25
                      And as I found out the cheap import blocks come with all the holes the same at the threading size for the 3/8-16 which is used in the threaded holes. So the threads aren't really all that useful.

                      I really need to get a 10mm solid carbide end mill and clean them out....

                      But on the other hand if I ignore the 3/8 threads and just make up some barrel nuts to take 1/4" bolts or studs and which will fit both the NON clearance holes and threaded holes I could just ignore the whole (hole?) issue and put things together in any format! I think that's a plan!
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Illinoyance View Post
                        Surburban tool is the only source I know of doing this.
                        Memories around here are very short...

                        https://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catal...-Metric-Blocks

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                        • #27
                          The holes are to help you pick up swarf to dispose of it.
                          I have a pair and actually use them -- they are useful for reference surfaces during some setups, etc.
                          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                          • #28
                            Can a man actually ever have enough blocks ?
                            And YES ! I use blocks A LOT. That’s why I made a full clamping system for my 246 set that allows me to integrate my shop made 123s to them. One thing you have to do first is use a little sanding drum on a long Dremel tip to remove the ginormous burrs inside the hole intersections.

                            Last edited by Tim The Grim; 10-01-2021, 05:55 PM.
                            Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                            9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                            • #29
                              So, what do you use them for that requires that setup instead of regular angle plates, etc?
                              2730

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                              • #30
                                In my home shop…

                                Machining old motorcycle cases and parts…



                                Custom dovetails for target shooting…



                                I spent many years building thin foil stamping dies. Form grinding die sections, spinning down tiny perforaters in the vee grooves on the 123s.
                                You can get compound angles for die draft on a small section using blocks without heavy magnetic sine fixtures.
                                When you develop a block mentality it stays with you.
                                Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                                9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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