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OT: Caine Mutiny - what is the purpose of the grease paint?

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  • OT: Caine Mutiny - what is the purpose of the grease paint?

    I was watching The Caine Mutiny this A.M., the portion where they were leading the landing craft to the shore (the yellow marker dye incident) everyone has either white or gray grease paint in their faces. What is/was the purpose of the grease paint?

    Just wondering,

    Axel

  • #2
    most of the grease sticks from WWII were a pale/light green and had dark green/olive drab on the other end. can remeber buying sticks of it in double lidded tin cans. in mid 50's at the real army navy surplus store. To play army and kill the nazi's and nips. Which of course is now politicly incorrect. Only sold stuff with the govt name and number over the counter. plus guns and ammo and hunting/fishing equipment. Had a very large duck type truck parked as a sign in the lot.
    It was camoflogue paint so the blend in better in the foliage after the beach.
    it would show up pale in the b&w or in the early color flicks as shades that were
    ov a lighter side didn't photo well.

    The urban camo's and face paint in gray and white and black are a recent trend with the city block to house fighting predicted.
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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    • #3
      You use the light colored camo in the shadowed area of the face: around the eyes, around the base of the nose, etc. The dark goes on the higher parts of the face: nose, chin,etc. That way it makes your face harder to see because everything is shaded the opposite of what it should be.
      Jon Bohlander
      My PM Blog

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      • #4
        the paint you are talking about was a flash or glare screen like the football players use and some baseball players under the eyes. some was on the face to protect from sparks. no need for camo on a ship at see.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bob,

          Ah, that's what I sort of thought. I was thinking it might have been for some sort of "fire protection", but then the only ship I was on was a cruise ship where there was food available 22 hours per day, the other 2 hours were covered by cabin service. The only "grease paint" I saw was sun screen and old ladies make-up (ugh, with a little shiver).

          Danke,

          Axel

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          • #6
            camo on a ship at sea

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            • #7
              There were in a landing craft about to hit the beach in the movie. They were ground pounders not swabbs. Being a snipe on a DD the only two things like that we saw was grease and paint but sometimes they did get mixed together.
              Glen
              Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
              I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
              All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

              Comment


              • #8
                PT,

                Snipes do not get it from a tube, they get it from wiping the sweat off their brow with their bare forearm, usually up to the elbows in grease or crankcase oil, black from the blowby.

                And, if you get something near your eyes from whatever, mebbe some finger stripes, to make a nice accent.

                We DID look pretty bad going off duty, no?

                I don't know if you are old enough to be a Motor Machinist's Mate or an Engineman, as I was, but then, I am only in my 60s. Good God, near 40 years out of it. How time flies!

                Cheers,

                George, formerly of the Black Gang, and that ain't racial.

                Comment


                • #9
                  George,
                  I was an engineman too, Black gang, A-gang, Small boat unit. I can still smell the 9250. My favorite words to hear were "NOW SET THE COLD IRON WATCH". After a 30 minutes hollywood shower you became presentable again,
                  a fat wallet helped too.
                  I remember those diesel boat bubbleheads, always smelled like moth balls and DFM even after a month on the beach.
                  Non, je ne regrette rien.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    George

                    High end of 50's, was on a WWII age Destroyer, in Nam. Even being an Electricains mate we did get grime and grease on every thing and from it seemed everywhere. For us it was shore power connected !
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I assumed this board would have number of snipes as members i did not go down there very often , we did have to do pms on the heat exchangers on the radar units. Eventually when they got know you, they invited me back down to visit . It sure was hot down there and pretty clean except the bilges. I liked it when they did cold iron too, it meant hollywood showers, for you land lubbers it is big deal after months of making water from the evaporators to have fresh water piped aboard to use . For me "Secure the special sea and anchor detail", were the words i wanted to hear. I was on a tin can and i got out in 68.
                      scariest thing to hear " I am from the government and i am here to help"

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                      • #12
                        Alguy,

                        Oh yeah, snipes and twidgets. I was a twidget, FTM-1 aboard the USS Hoel DDG-13 guided missle destroyer, a tin can. (FTM=fire control technician missles). I spent some time in the after engine room PMS'ing my heat exchangers for both fire control and 3D air search radar's. As long as you didn't dump sea water in their engine room and picked up after yourself the snipes didn't mind. They weren't going to do the maintenance on your gear anyway so didn't really have much choice but we tried to get along. I didn't care much for the boiler rooms, way too hot. I spent almost four years on that ship, six total enlistment. Got out in 1977. "Now Liberty Call, Liberty Call"
                        Bill

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                        • #13
                          Snipes every where I go, oh well

                          DD 528 torpedoman here

                          Gulf of Tonkin Yacht Club member also
                          George from Conyers Ga.
                          Remember
                          The early bird gets the worm, BUT it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.

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                          • #14
                            While were doing this, any Coasty snipes here?

                            FN, USCG

                            And before I hear any, stick your shallow water jokes.
                            Gene

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                            • #15
                              topct,

                              OK, no jokes. You are probably over 6 foot though

                              We had one CG Reservist on a deployment, nice guy. He somehow got special dispensation. We were a MSO, a Mine Sweeper, but an Ocean boat, not a C or Coastal boat.

                              All diesel, almost all non-magnetic, beryllium copper tools when at sea, monel tanks, wooden hull.

                              To get a litle on the theme of the forum, I think the only machine we had on board was a drill press in the EM (Electrician's Mate) shack. DC didn't even have any more than cutting torches. A grinder, here and there.

                              Aux Engine Room, motor whaleboat engineer, fun with the Buda and Joe's Reduction Gear.

                              Badger Vapor Compressor for water, hard to keep up, my job. First night on picket during Cuba blockade, called Bridge a dozen times, can't make water, troughs too deep in waves, made Midnight Report (Fuel, Oil and Water King) 50 % water on board. Water rationing immediate. 6 weeks of saltwater showers. THAT was no fun. I think that was when I decided once a week was adequate.

                              Ah, well, fun at the time, not what I would want to do for 20 years, 4 and out, in '66.

                              Cheers,

                              George

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