Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Southbend 9b

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Southbend 9b

    Good day,

    I have a chance to purchase a southbend 9b with approx 4K worth of tooling. That is the sellers estimate. He wants 4K for it. It has been completely rebuilt including new lead screw etc… bed is said to be almost new. Thoughts? Or would it be smarter to go with a new king or grizzly
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

  • #2
    that'll be a big fat no at that price. You could get a lovely condition well tooled Heavy 10 for that kind of money, if not a whole bunch of other lathes that have quick change gear boxes and nice paint

    Comment


    • #3
      We are talking cad $ which is less, but it seemed a bit steep

      Comment


      • #4
        I am having trouble imagining what could be 4k of tooling that is usable on an SB. Maybe at new retail price you could get there.

        You seem to have found a "dreamer", who wants you to fund his boat or vacation.
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gvanzeggelaar View Post
          Good day,

          I have a chance to purchase a southbend 9b with approx 4K worth of tooling. That is the sellers estimate. He wants 4K for it. It has been completely rebuilt including new lead screw etc… bed is said to be almost new. Thoughts? Or would it be smarter to go with a new king or grizzly
          Looks like you're new around here. Welcome to the forum. It's a great place to exchange information, ask questions, and learn new things.

          Going to agree with what's been said several times already. Asking price is pretty steep for that machine. If you're willing to spend in the 4K price range there are a host of better choices that will give you a bigger, newer, more accurate machine. And probably for a bit less money.

          One of the lessons I learned about buying a used "well tooled" machine is that I would wind up spending too much money buying what somebody else had wanted for tooling, and not necessarily what best suits my own needs. I've found it better to start with a basic machine and add the tooling that I need as I come across the need for it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Call me cynical, but disassembled, cleaned and repainted is not the same as "completely rebuilt". If he actually did that, he likely bought some of the parts, such as the "new lead screw", and of course he will have receipts he can supply. If he made all the parts himself he will have a well equipped shop or access to one, and should be able to in some way confirm to you that he has the ability to have done that.

            If you do find a used lathe that you think is priced fairly, ideally you want a knowledgeable friend to evaluate it for/with you. At the very least there are a couple of things you can look at to determine how badly it is worn. Check the backlash in the cross feed. Set the carriage lock so that the carriage just moves freely up by the chuck, then crank towards the tail stock. If it binds, that suggests the ways are more worn at the head stock end, which is where most work is done and where wear will first appear in a machine with any significant amount of use.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

            Comment


            • #7
              Your location will influence what a realistic price is. I live in Toronto. My Southbend 9 inch, admittedly not newly rebuilt, but in almost umworn condition cost me the grand total of $ 400. I have since spent $ 400 on chucks, $200 on a 3c collet set ,fitted a DC drive motor and controller which I already owned, say $ 250,a cheap quick change toolpost and holders say $ 250. I have $1500 in her. If I found another equivalent for $ 2000 or so I would have it for my cottage, but NOT $ 4000.
              If the offer included toolboxes full of useful good quality tools, indeed everything to tool up a shop except the machines themselves then $4000 might be a very reasonable price.
              IF you are anywhere near me give me a private message, as a member of TSME and some live steam clubs I often get news of what is for sale by members or others sometimes , sadly a complete shop of a deceased member, and good deals can sometimes be had., for other reasons.
              I am only 71,my stuff is already spoken for, and anyway I intend to have many more years wearing it out.!!!!
              Regards David Powell.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you are in the process of trying to buy a lathe for your shop, then a few comments may be in order.

                1) "Perfection is out of stock at present"...... If you buy used, there will be wear. That does not have to be bad, I have done a lot of good work on worn machines. If you buy new, the machine will not be worn, but at the typical affordable price it will still have issues, due to being made to a price and not a quality level.

                2) Features and accessories are not always what they seem. Features on new machines may have drawbacks, like threading gearboxes that still require a lot of gear changing, so they are not really "features" at all.
                Accessories that come with used machines may or may not actually fit the machine. They may or may not be useful to you. Accessories have wear also. If you are being expected to pay a lot for a machine, because of accessories, make sure the basic machine is good enough to justify a high price, and then decide if the accessories are useful, actually fit that machine, and are in condition to justify the price. A pig wearing jewelry is still a pig.

                3) Be aware that many people will try for the highest price. In my area, some folks seem to try on the "it works fine so it is 'worth' X percentage of the new price". Often that is 50%. These folks usually have a catalog that shows the "new" price (at full retail) and are aggressive about attacking any questions about the prices as "trying to cheat them". They soon learn that does not fly around here, because there is a good deal of machinery and tooling around, and others sell for less, because they have to, the stuff is not rare.

                2730

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Everything not impossible is compulsory

                Comment


                • #9
                  This morning I messaged someone who had just lowered the advertised price for a machine from $650 to $500 after the ad being up for weeks. A similar machine new is $650 (I sent him a link to show that). I told him I generally expect to pay no more than maybe 50% for a used machine, depending on condition. He messaged back that he thought "$400 was a fair price". So... gotta ask... if $400 was "fair", what did he think $650 was? I didn't ask, I'm now ignoring him, although he has just messaged (8 hours later) that he'd take $350. I don't even know if I want the damn thing at any price anyway.
                  "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks a bunch guys for all the responses and advice. I have pm'd a member here for further advice.

                    Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The seller accidentally added a zero to his price. Tell him that you agree that $400 is a fair price.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Let’s be real here. South Bend 9’s are sucky lathes. They do not deserve the prices they get because people are brainwashed from elders who are suffering nostalgia. They were the cheap lathes in their day, and they are desirable today only because of their size and assumed rigidity for their size.
                        Threaded spindles suck. Plain bearings suck. Non hardened ways suck. Flat belt drives suck. What you presented in photos is less than what I gave away for free to a member here. (A 9c in decent condition).
                        There’s no such thing as 4,000$ worth of tooling for a SB 9” lathe. This is a 450$ lathe.
                        An import Taiwan made 12x36 lathe is a few magnitudes better, and yes, weighs around 1,000 lbs.
                        It’s always the new guy who is afraid of weight and size of machine tools, so they gravitate to a “toy”. Weight (mass) is critical in a machine tool, more mass the better.
                        If you’re willing to drop that kind of cash on a South Bend, do yourself a huge favor and get something decent, 12x36 import minimum or an Emco Super 11, or equivalent high quality tool.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well it sounds like this is a piss poor deal. I appreciate the input and you guys saving me from wasting my money.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Plus, it's lime green

                            Glad you've decided to pass. If you don't mind waiting, you'll find a much better deal out there, I'm sure.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gvanzeggelaar View Post
                              Well it sounds like this is a piss poor deal. I appreciate the input and you guys saving me from wasting my money.
                              Well, yeah... hate to say it. I spent a good 2 years finding my lathe. I got a SB 9A with the full-length bed, quick-change box, 3 chucks, 2 face plates all the tooling, etc. including the SB metric gears and a complete SB collet set. For less than 1500 and a 5-hr drive. The seller even had all the original paperwork and manuals from new, and he threw in a B&S mic with it.

                              There was little or nothing wrong with any of it, all of it had barely been used since 1945.

                              If you want to find an honest deal, I recommend the classifieds section at Practical Machinist. They don't tolerate dreamers or scam artists over there. Course they can also be a bunch of humourless jerks, too.

                              The only other advice i have is, take your time looking -- be willing to spend a year or two for the right deal, and be willing to drive a ways to pick up.
                              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 09-28-2021, 11:06 AM.
                              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X