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Some work on a TX650.

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  • #16
    I know people already think I'm strange, but I just gotta say, that motor is Beautiful! And here I thought I was the only one left who loves black cases and polished with nickel plate...
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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    • #17
      Almost correct, the TX 500 was a four stroke. The TX 650 was for 73 and and 74 then reverted back to XS. The TX 750 was released in 72 and discontinued in 75, due to it being a piece of rubbish. The TX500 was marketed 73 to 74 as TX500. then renamed the XS500 in 75. it was discontinued in 78. Neither were popular bikes. The XS650 soldiered on until 84, but Yamaha discontinued it, despite it being a very popular bike, to concentrate on the XJ series. Interestingly the bike first appeared in 1955 as a 500, manufactured by Hosk and increased to 650 a little later. The Showa company bought out Hosk and then Yamaha bought Showa. The Japanese had many motorcycle manufacturers from early in the 20th century, some copies, some originals, but all very interesting, shame we in the West missed out on them.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
        I know people already think I'm strange, but I just gotta say, that motor is Beautiful! And here I thought I was the only one left who loves black cases and polished with nickel plate...
        Very little nickel plate on this, just the points covers, oil tube and cylinder head nuts, all the other shiny bits are polished ally.

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        • #19
          Single points conversion. I wanted to simplify the points system, but I do like mechanical things, so decided to convert the twin points to a single points system. There was a cam available for this conversion, but apparently they weren't very accurate, so I decided to make my own. First order of business was a backing plate which I made from some 3mm thick steel, shaped it on the lathe, filed cutouts for the minting screws and drilled and tapped the plate for points and lube felt.

          Next I turned down some stock to 18mm, bored it 8mm, filed the ramps, then cut the keyway. Nope, timing was way off. Did it this way for a few attempts without luck. So, I decided to do it in reverse: Cut the keyway, mount the round stock on the advance rod, time the engine, gap the points, set the points at the midway position and mark where the heel of the points counted the round can and file the ramp. Success, I managed to get the timing for number one cylinder spot on with the correct dwell after only a few files. Next I rotated the cam 180degrees and did the same for the other ramp, success again. It's tiny bit out out, but nothing a quick touch up with a file won't fix. I'll also have to look at the points position on the backing plate, it's almost touching the bowl.

          For this conversion, the two single outlet coils don't work, so I bought a twin outlet coil for CB750, made an ally bracket and polished it and mounted it to the original tab on the frame.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by toglhot; 10-03-2021, 05:07 AM.

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          • #20
            Continued.
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            • #21
              Exhaust pipes. I mocked up a pipe for the right side, welding together some exhaust pipe at the appropriate angles with the right amount of twist then took it to an exhaust centre and asked them to mandrel bend two bends from 42mm pipe to match the angles, so I could weld them together later. The exhaust guy assured me he could bend the entire pipe with the correct twist, then reverse it for the left side, so naturally I jumped at the chance to avoid welding the two bends together. Roll on five weeks, yep that's right, it took him five weeks, and I picked up the pipes and took them home. Well, what a balls up, the only thing that was correct was the twist. So, I cut both pipes around half way between the two bends, removed a 25 mm section and welded the two bends together. Problem! The bottom bend was way out, leaving the exhaust bending down toward the ground. To fix, I made a V cut in the pipe a few inches after the bend, bent the tail section up and welded the two pieces together. Repeating the process for the other side. Now, if you think exhaust pipe is round, it ain't! So twisting the pipes and butting them together leaves a few steps. So, I hammered them a little so they'd match up, welded them together and ground them smooth, then painted them with exhaust black pint.
              I mounted some 10mm thick ally in the four jaw, turned up the 42 mm hole, then marked the position of the 10mm exhaust stud holes drilled them through, shaped the clamps and polished them. For the lower mount, I bent up some 3mm steel plate in a half circle with short returns either side, shaped another 3 mm piece of steel to affix to the frame and welded it to the half circle clamp, then painted it exhaust black paint. Next I bent some 3mm ally plate in a half circle with returns each end, stuck it together with the steel half circle and drilled through four holes for stainless Allen heads, and polished the ally half clamps. The pipes have a very slight upwards sweep.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Continued.
                Attached Files

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by toglhot View Post
                  Almost correct, the TX 500 was a four stroke. The TX 650 was for 73 and and 74 then reverted back to XS. The TX 750 was released in 72 and discontinued in 75, due to it being a piece of rubbish. The TX500 was marketed 73 to 74 as TX500. then renamed the XS500 in 75. it was discontinued in 78. Neither were popular bikes. The XS650 soldiered on until 84, but Yamaha discontinued it, despite it being a very popular bike, to concentrate on the XJ series. Interestingly the bike first appeared in 1955 as a 500, manufactured by Hosk and increased to 650 a little later. The Showa company bought out Hosk and then Yamaha bought Showa. The Japanese had many motorcycle manufacturers from early in the 20th century, some copies, some originals, but all very interesting, shame we in the West missed out on them.
                  You are of course correct, the TX 500 was a 4 stroke. I was thinking of the Suzuki T 500 of that era, or not thinking at all, LOL.
                  But yes it was a sad day when they discontinued the XS/TX 650, I'd bet that they would sell well in today's market.

                  I must say I'm quite impressed with the amount of effort you have invested in polishing the details. To my mind there is nothing more beautiful or captivating than polished aluminum or stainless. The depth of it's beauty makes chrome look cheap and garish, or like I like to call it, the lazy man's way of spiffing things up.

                  You've got to show us some of your buffing and polishing equipment and techniques, looks like you've honed it down to an art.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #24
                    Nothing extraordinary, just an 8" GMF bench grinder I bought back around 1976. Over the years I lost some bits and pieces for it: wheel guards, tool rests and so on so converted it to a polisher. Sisal mops, sewn cloth mops, loose leaf mops, skinny mops, small diameter mops and nylon fibre wheels, hang off the side of the stand. Black, white, brown and green compound sit on the shelf over top. I sometimes use a random orbital sand to flatten the surface, followed by a nylon fibre wheel, sisal mop with black compound, sewn cloth mop and white compound, loose leaf mop with either white or green compound, then polish by hand with Silvo and a soft cloth.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by toglhot; 10-03-2021, 06:45 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Remote spin on oil filter and cooler.
                      To effect the modifications for inclusion of a remote, spin on filter and cooler, I had to modify the right side engine cover. The oil pump is located inside this cover.

                      The oil galley from the pump is 10mm and is drilled at a odd angle on two axis' to the cover. Halfway along it is cross drilled at a right angle, both of these holes are plugged with a blanking bung at the front of the cover. The cross drilled hole leads to the stock filter behind the cover on the side of the engine side cover. So, the pump pumps oil up the 10mm hole, does a right turn into the cross drilled hole and on to the filter, then on through the engine.

                      So, in order to fit a remote, spin on filter, I had to remove the bung to the 10mm hole on the front of the cover, drill the 10mm hole out to 10.8mm and thread with a 12mm tap to a depth of 40mm. I then turned up a stainless, threaded barb to suit, the threaded barb when screwed in place, covers the cross drilled hole, thus bypassing the stock filter in the side of the cover. So the pump now pumps oil up the 10mm hole in the cover, through the threaded barb and then on to a remote spin on filter, via a rubber hose.. The oil enters the filter and then exits that and continues on to the cooler. From there it flows to the replacement filter cover I machined up, into the filter housing behind the cover, which is now empty, then on to the engine. Sounds complicated, but it’s not really. The spin on filter does a better job than the stock filter as the stock filter is really only a strainer.

                      Mounting the side cover on the drill table was a job and a half, as the hole to the oil pump is off skew on two axis’. Once I’d drilled and tapped the 10mm hole, because of the weird angle the hole exits the cover, it’s not square to the surface, so I had to square the surface up and countersink it to accept an O ring to seal the barb using a modified router bit.

                      Next I spun up a spin on filter housing, drilled two holes in the side and tapped them for mounting, drilled two holes in the top for oil inlet and outlet and underneath turn a round channel for the oil to enter the exit. I then spun up a threaded spigot to screw the filter on, pressed that into place in the filter housing, then spun up a threaded barb that screws into that, sandwiching the filter housing between. To mount the filter housing, I fabricated some new engine mounts from 10mm ally, the right one being extended downward some 25 mm and affixed the filter housing to that. I drilled and tapped two holes in the front of each each mount, fabricated a cooler mount from 3mm all and fixed the cooler to that via four small, Rubber grommets. For mounting I cut four lengths of 10mm ally tube to length to fit between the cooler mounting lugs, cut four stainless 6mm bolts to length, threaded them through the cooler lugs and ally tubes and on through the grommets. To prevent the grommet from being squished from overtightening, I spun up four positive stop T nuts from ally and threaded them.
                      I removed the old strainer cover and binned it, then machined up a new cover with a protuberance for oil inletand pressed a barb I spun up into that.

                      So now the the system works thus: Oil leaves the pump and travels up the 10.8mm hole in the side cover and exits via the stainless barb screwed into the front of the cover. The oil enters a rubber tube and travels via the central stainless barb in the filter housing, into the filter then out via the pressed in barb next to the inlet barb. It then travels to the cooler via a rubber hose, through the cooler and cooled oil then flows via a rubber hose to the protuberance on the right side of the engine cover via the pressed in barb and on to lubricate the engine with nice, clean, cooled engine oil.

                      A big job. Took a lot of thinking and work making fiddly little things, housings, brackets barbs, brackets and so on. There's a bit of a jumble of rubber hoses behind the cooler, but they aren't too noticeable.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        Continued.
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                        • #27
                          More.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #28
                            Cable splitter.
                            The TX650 came with a silly twin cable hand throttle, one cable for each carb. I bought a single cable throttle and looked around for a two into one junction box. Only ones I could find were made of plastic or steel with no means on mounting them, so it just flops around under the tank with the cables.

                            Didn’t like that idea, so I made one from a small slab of ally. I bored a 14mm hole through the slab and ran a 5/8” UNF thread through each end on the lathe to a depth of 11mm. Next I milled a step and drilled two 6mm holes in the step for mounting it to the upper engine mounts.
                            The two end caps are also aluminium turned up from some round stock. One has a one cable inlet, the other takes two cables. I ran a 5/8” UNF thread on them and then ran my scissor knurler over them. Both caps are fitted with O rings as the body will be filled with grease for lubrication. Only the second time I’ve used this knurler since I made it about five years ago. It works well.

                            The slide I made from brass, 14mm round, for a snug, sliding fit inside the main body, and 25mm long. Through this I drilled three 1.5mm holes, then countersunk them with a 3mm bit for the cable nipples. I still hadn't cut three slots with a slit saw in the slide in the picture, so the. Cables could be fitted.

                            I also turned up some long adjusters for the cables to aid in syncing. These have a fairly long threaded section about 30mm long. The adjusters were drilled through 3mm for the inner cable, the top drilled to about 10mm with a 5.5mm dill for the outer cable and the top section was also knurled. To fit these to the carbs I fabricated two ally brackets and threaded them the same as the adjusters and fitted them to the carbs. I then made up up three cables, fitted nipples to the ends, fitted the splitter to the top right engine bracket and fitted everything together.
                            Attached Files

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                            • #29
                              Continued
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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by toglhot View Post

                                Very little nickel plate on this, just the points covers, oil tube and cylinder head nuts, all the other shiny bits are polished ally.

                                I thnik it is a good move on your prt.. It wont survive without it, your help. ... JR

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