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Some work on a TX650.

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  • #91
    That's a neat setup. Unfortunately I' can't mount the 90 degree banjo in the manner you have, just not enough room, I'll spin up an aluminium spacer to lift the banjo up a little..

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    • #92
      Originally posted by toglhot View Post
      That's a neat setup. Unfortunately I' can't mount the 90 degree banjo in the manner you have, just not enough room, I'll spin up an aluminium spacer to lift the banjo up a little..
      It looks like you are still running the caliper in front of the fork leg. It gets a little trickier getting the line ran clean when going to a braided line right down to it. I’m sure that setup was the same as the RD and had a hard metal line that came around before it weren’t to the rubber flex line. Based on your other work I’m sure you will figure it out to look good.

      Just a heads up, it that is the factory caliper(or direct replacement) and did have the metal line going to it you will most likely have to pop out the “olive” at the bottom that seals the flare on the hard line. It may interfere with the banjo bolt if you don’t.

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      • #93
        Early XS650 had callipers at the front. In 75/76 Yamaha used an aluminium calliper and moved them behind the leg. I did have a look at mounting the calliper at the rear a while back, but it was a no go. Can't remember why, I think the calliper was rubbing on the disk from memory.

        Yes, the brake line has two steel lines, one at top, another at the bottom, the steel lines have a M10 x 1.0 thread, whereas the banjo bolts have M10 x 1.25 thread. You can get banjo bolts with the finer thread, but not long enough to use a spacer, May have to turn one up on the lathe I think.

        I'd like to get lines similar to the ones I got to play with, but they don't meet our ADR standards, so I'll have to get some made or buy OEMs.

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        • #94
          I've designed and put together a couple of much simplified harness' one for lights, the other for ignition, minus stuff I don't require, neutral light and so on. But still the spaghetti bucket lived up to it's name. I dislike untidy with a vengeance so made a bracket that sits inside the spaghetti bucket to try and keep things neat and make it easier to find and connect the wires.

          Two grommets sit in the middle for routing earth wires through to earth connections and a couple of linked, Delrin, insulated terminal bridges sit either side of them for power connections. Mostly connected up, but still have to connect the headlight cables and speedo light cables, not sure about adding idiot lights, more procrastination needed there me thinks!

          The cables emanating from the switchgear are very, very light gauge, not sure if they'll handle the current, even though all lights are LEDs, so I may have to either solder in heavier gauge cables or change the switchgear.
          Attached Files

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          • #95
            Finished off the front wiring and spaghetti bucket. Still looks a little untidy, but neater than most I think. I even mounted the lens on a couple of wire safety straps to stop it pulling on the harness. I had, to buy these double female bullet connectors from China, couldn't find anyone in OZ who stocks them. Trying to find sub 6mm eye terminals was a job, same with 3mm blade terminals, they stock female blades but not males. And they complain that everyone is turning to online shopping - no bloody wonder.
            Got to attack the back end now, mount the indicators and plug them and the tail light into the lighting harness.
            Attached Files

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            • #96
              Originally posted by toglhot View Post
              Finished off the front wiring and spaghetti bucket. Still looks a little untidy, but neater than most I think.
              It looks good. There’s not a whole lot you can do with it.

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              • #97
                The indicators I bought don't have a long enough threaded section to go through the guard bracket, so I made these extension brackets to mount the indicators on. The V shaped cut out at the rear of the brackets fits around the frame tab protrusion, thus stopping the brackets from moving.
                Attached Files

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                • #98
                  A few weeks ago I sent off for some tapered mufflers, these were said to suit from 38 - 45mm pipes using the supplied sleeves. Well they came, but aside from being chrome when I ordered black, they were rubbish: The spigot that goes over the exhaust pipe is tapered, so no matter how tight the clamp is done up, they have an alarming amount of movement, so I wrapped them up and on sold them.

                  Today I went to an exhaust shop and bought 1.5 m of 57 mm pipe and the same amount of 41mm pipe and asked the guy to taper the ends of the 41mm pipe out to 57mm. This was just an experiment mind, just wanted to see what they'd look like. Once I'd welded the tapered cones on to the 57mm pipe, I slid the 57mm end of the mufflers over the exhaust, stood back and had a squiz. Very pleasantly surprised, they give the bike the look I'm after. So next week, or whenever, I'll get some 45mm pipe and get the guy to expand the ends out to 57 mm and weld them on to the other end of the muffler.

                  The plan is to make up a couple of long baffles and slide them all the way inside the mufflers, start the bike and gradually slide the baffles out until I achieve what I think is an acceptable noise level. I'll also throw a bit of fibreglass insulation in the bodies to dampen the high level noise.

                  They look a bit Pommyish, but that's alright, I like Pommy bikes.

                  Once I've finished the mufflers, that's pretty much the build finished. So I'll strip it down, repaint everything again, give the tank a coat of isocynate free clear coat and stick the bike back together. All that remains to be done then is get some tyres fitted and upholster the seat. That'll be the end of my bike building days though, unfortunately, this build has pretty much stuffed my body, my elbows are stuffed, can't doing anything without lots of pain now. So once finished I'll probably book elbow replacement surgery and retire from life. Although, every now and again I'll probably wander out to the workshop, sit on the bike, blow through my lips to make some bike noises, dribble down my chin and remember the good old days of my youth. Still a bit left to do though.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #99
                    Finished one of the mufflers today, plus a baffle. Unfortunately, none of the tube sizes will slide inside the next size up, .25mm too big. I did, consider getting the exhaust guy to expand the tubes, but, I don't share their idea of a 'good fit'. So, using a drum sander I shaved .25mm off the inside of the tail pipe and the same amount of the receiver end. Now, because round tube is not round, more egg shaped, I can match the oval shapes together, push one tube in, twist and get a really tight fit.

                    Baffles were fun to make, 168 holes in total. I drilled 14 along the length of the pipe, then drilled another 11 lines of holes around the circumference, by the time I'd drilled the last line the holes didn't match up, so, I mounted another piece of tube on the lathe and used the bit to scribe lines along the length, 9.9mm apart, then used the dial indicator to mark around the tube at 10mm intervals, then drilled using the mill. Success. I know you can't see the holes in the baffles and it won't make any difference, but,
                    At least I'll know they are neat and the rows and lines match.

                    All I have to do to tune the decibels is start the bike and pull the baffle out until I'm happy with the noise level then cut the excess off. In area, I need 58 x 5mm holes to match the area of the exhaust pipe outlet, I can probably go a few less actually because the exhaust outlet is only arlound 34/36mm as is the baffle outlet.

                    Welding the cones front and back was also fun: Tacked the cone in four places as straight as I could get it, then mounted the muffler in the chuck, spun it and using a dial gauge, marked where I needed to weld in order to pull it straight. Four times from memory I did this, with 25mm long beads. The tail pipe on the other one I did yesterday, manually, is a little off, but I'll remedy that after I've added the receiver cone.

                    A good day today, muffler gives the bike the look I wanted. Once both are done, I'll double skin a portion on the inside, weld some mounting points on, then paint them black. Not sure what type bracket to use, but it will attached to a polished aluminium stay bolted to the pillion passenger peg mounts. I'm thinking of a wide polished aluminium clamp around the body of the muffler, that will negate the need for double skinning. I can feel a 'try and see' coming up
                    Attached Files

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                    • Nice job on the mufflers. I made a set of 2 stroke silencers but cheated and bought the perforated tube.

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                      • Toglhot:

                        I've returned to the forum after an extended period to find your absolutely fascinating thread. Just fabulous persnickety fabrication on your part, which reminded me of a very good friend who had an original XS650 back in our youth. Earlier in the thread I saw a post of what appears to be a Norton engine mounted in a Triumph frame?

                        "
                        They look a bit Pommyish, but that's alright, I like Pommy bikes."

                        Ditto! I still have the '74 Norton 850 sitting beside the milling machine in the garage challenging me to attempt to get it off the center stand. Still haven't given up the hope of ever riding it again.

                        Good on ya mate for resurrecting a gem of a classic motorcycle!

                        -regards
                        bob

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                        • The xs650 is an interesting bike. They gained a big popularity in the states with the “cafe” and “chopper” crowd alike with a pretty big aftermarket support.

                          I never followed it real closely but crank re-phasing is pretty popular with those engines. 270 degree or “twingles” being the most common.

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                          • Yep the XS is a shaker, more so than the Brit twins compliments of a lighter flywheel.

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                            • Finished off the muffler today and made a polished aluminium hanger for it. I was going to double skin a section on the side of the muffler and weld mounting tabs to it, but decided these full cradle hangers would look better, plus, nothing to break off from the vibration. Happy with the result, these mufflers look nice and suit the build I think.
                              Attached Files

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                              • These are the exhaust hangers, they clamp around the mufflers, a stainless washer between the bends allows the the clamps to be done up tight thus gripping the mufflers securely and preventing the ends of the clamps from bending. Click image for larger version

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