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  • Another 3 phase Question

    I found this today looking around... A Digital Phase Shifter? It is like a VFD without the controls...

    1. Has anyone used one of these?
    2. Am I better of with a VFD (price about the same)?
    3. Is there a better company to by from?

    I am still looking at options to power a 3 Phase 10HP motor. I was looking at VFD and found these. My current Rotary Phase converter is rated at 5HP and I thought about replacing it... but this a very cheap alternative.

    I expect to get some smart ass remarks but I hoping to get some good information form here.



    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07F2613GN...ations_asins_1

  • #2
    it's a bit puzzling as to just what it is, and how it is "digital". It's small and light, so that limits what it may be.

    Because of the small size and the motor size requirements, it may be essentially a static converter that has more than one "run capacitor". It may connect either of them, or both (for instance) depending on the motor load. Can't be many in there.

    That's a guess, really.
    2730

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Everything not impossible is compulsory

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      it's a bit puzzling as to just what it is, and how it is "digital". It's small and light, so that limits what it may be.

      Because of the small size and the motor size requirements, it may be essentially a static converter that has more than one "run capacitor". It may connect either of them, or both (for instance) depending on the motor load. Can't be many in there.

      That's a guess, really.
      I am thinking maybe its similar to a Phase Perfect? Sounds very close to their description. https://www.phasetechnologies.com/pr.../phase-perfect

      I know the Phase perfect is the only phase converter Haas will allow on their cnc equipment without voiding the warranty.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        it's a bit puzzling as to just what it is, and how it is "digital". It's small and light, so that limits what it may be.

        Because of the small size and the motor size requirements, it may be essentially a static converter that has more than one "run capacitor". It may connect either of them, or both (for instance) depending on the motor load. Can't be many in there.

        That's a guess, really.
        From the 'Q&A' sheet there in the images I think you're right its a static converter not any sort of inverter.

        Click image for larger version

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        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

        Comment


        • #5
          After reading some other information I like the VFD option more for the ramp up / soft start...

          Prices are about the same.

          The Phase perfect option.... wow. They are proud of them... @4000 without options.

          Comment


          • #6
            The Amazon reviews are interesting. The buyers who don't like it really don't like it. But I suppose that's typical.
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

            Comment


            • #7
              The VFD idea is possible, sort-of. But with no heatsink, it does not look very likely. I have seen lower voltage units operated at high power with no heatsink at all, but the higher voltage devices dissipate more power and I'd expect them to require cooling.

              Also, the "no high frequencies" given in the description argues against almost any form of "PWM" type ("switching") device. The power range given is very typical of static converters.

              Since the base is not seen, I suppose there could be a non-mentioned requirement to mount that to a metal surface that functions as a heatsink, but from all I see, it appears much more likely to be a form of static converter.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #8
                It's not 3 phase out if it only does 2 legs...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                  It's not 3 phase out if it only does 2 legs...
                  It claims to have 3 phase when the motor is running..... The question is what the %$#@! they mean by that. If it is ONLY a static converter, that would mean the 3rd phase is coming from the motor, and not the box.

                  But if it is a static converter with a run capacitor, then it would be supplying current to the 3rd wire through the "run capacitor". that is actually not quite correct as to phase.

                  Still questionable as to what the "digital" means........ maybe nothing at all.
                  2730

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Everything not impossible is compulsory

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It looks very much like 'Solid State Soft starters" I have used in the past, except it has 1ph to 3ph output!!?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What the "digital" means? Well, it has an LED. If that LED is driven by a digital chip or circuit (ON/OFF) then it is digital.

                      If it is anything more than a simple capacitor or two, you would think they would brag about how good their circuit is. The lack of any such description tells me it is almost the cheapest possible circuit inside.



                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                      It claims to have 3 phase when the motor is running..... The question is what the %$#@! they mean by that. If it is ONLY a static converter, that would mean the 3rd phase is coming from the motor, and not the box.

                      But if it is a static converter with a run capacitor, then it would be supplying current to the 3rd wire through the "run capacitor". that is actually not quite correct as to phase.

                      Still questionable as to what the "digital" means........ maybe nothing at all.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I posted about Identical device a couple years back and responses are similar also.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I know nothing about this product, but with reading the Q&A I am in agreement with Jerry... My bet is a static converter with an on/off (digital) light. Sorry, I am VERY skeptical and think is is almost snake oil.
                          Robin

                          Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What are you looking to power outlaw?
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It is not that static converters do not work. To a large degree, they do. But it is the use of the word "digital" that brings up such concern. I would not do business with them. PERIOD!



                              Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
                              I know nothing about this product, but with reading the Q&A I am in agreement with Jerry... My bet is a static converter with an on/off (digital) light. Sorry, I am VERY skeptical and think is is almost snake oil.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment

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