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OT: Hydraulic powered chainsaw

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Farmer that I worked for as a teenager had one of those, on a 10-foot pole, IIRC it cost around $600 at the time, worked very well on the tractor hydraulics.

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  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post

    Oh, dammit, now I have to do that! That's brilliant!

    'Honey, I'll be out in the barn for the next 3 weeks- send the UPS guy my way when he shows up with the crates, ok?'

    t
    It is not so hard to build actually. The most complex part is the oil pump for the chain. On mine it is built sort of like a spring loaded syringe. When the valve is activated to supply hydraulic oil to the saw motor a hydraulic hose that is Tee'd into that hose pushes down the plunger that supplies an adjustable amount of oil to the chain. The chain oil is in a canister and when the saw motor is stopped and relieves pressure the spring pushes the piston up which sucks oil from the canister. It is very reliable and works a charm.

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  • Tobias-B
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    This is a hydraulic chainsaw I made for my excavator. It works great. I now can rotate the saw to cut at angles also.
    https://youtu.be/1PFG6jLU5cY
    Oh, dammit, now I have to do that! That's brilliant!

    'Honey, I'll be out in the barn for the next 3 weeks- send the UPS guy my way when he shows up with the crates, ok?'

    t

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    This is also cool

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  • Ironbearmarine
    replied
    Originally posted by IanPendle View Post
    As well as being very powerful for their size, they have another advantage - they can be used underwater.
    I knew a fellow that plied the waterways around San Francisco Bay, with a pile driver on a barge and a tugboat. He did salvage work and replaced pilings.
    I helped him out once, running a huge 1 man, reciprocating piling saw, used for underwater work. Later he gave it to me, figuring i would use it for my many dock side projects. Still have it. Savage looking thing. A Klingon could carry it into battle.

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  • wmgeorge
    replied
    The tree service came to remove two trees in our side yard. One a 40 foot blue Spruce, the other a large soft maple 3 foot dia trunk. Two guys a truck and a boom with a robot arm pincher and the hydraulic circular saw. One guy with a wireless remote controlled the robot arm the other guy made sure things got picked up and in the chipper. Two hours later they are done and pulling out.

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  • Mike Burch
    replied
    I've seen a large hydraulically-driven circular saw on a road-maintenance machine. Instead of cutting trees away, it was happily slicing though a rock that had been exposed in the bank beside the road. It was cooled by a guy with a fire hose. The noise was unreal.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    I was trimming one of my trees where a branch was touching the 13,800 volt line
    that runs across my property. Is I was almost all the way through the cut with my
    chainsaw, I felt the tingle from the current passing through my chain saw and
    through me ! ! ! All this while I was on a fiberglass ladder. Scary stuff.

    --Doozer

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  • RB211
    replied
    Well, I’m confused. I bought a nice Stihl chainsaw. The engine is NOT the problem, but the damn chain stretching and needing constant tightening, and sharpening fairly often. No, I wasn’t digging trenches in the sand with it. Yes, used plenty of bar oil as well. I can only assume that shrub oaks really are hell on chainsaws.

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    This is a hydraulic chainsaw I made for my excavator. It works great. I now can rotate the saw to cut at angles also.
    https://youtu.be/1PFG6jLU5cY
    Perfect for the zombie apocalypse. Operator totally avoids any blood spatter.. A longer bar may be needed to handle crowds.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    This is a hydraulic chainsaw I made for my excavator. It works great. I now can rotate the saw to cut at angles also.
    https://youtu.be/1PFG6jLU5cY
    You impress me, sir.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by eKretz View Post

    Nice job! You mentioned having added capability to angle the saw - does the rocking mechanism turn with it so that you can still feed the saw in a straight line then? Pretty slick setup.
    No at the moment the feed is all done with the excavator arm controls so that makes cutting at anything other than 0 degrees of 90 degrees difficult. I will mount the rotating device between the hookup to the excavator and the actual saw and include a downfeed cylinder regulated by the pressure of the saw motor. Meaning if the pressure in the line to the saw motor goes up the downfeed will go down. That will eliminate having to have a separate control for the downfeed. I have it all figured out but haven't gotten to it yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • eKretz
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    This is a hydraulic chainsaw I made for my excavator. It works great. I now can rotate the saw to cut at angles also.
    https://youtu.be/1PFG6jLU5cY
    Nice job! You mentioned having added capability to angle the saw - does the rocking mechanism turn with it so that you can still feed the saw in a straight line then? Pretty slick setup.

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Line crew will also have a hydraulic powered sawsall on the truck for cutting crossarms and braces used to reinforce poles that have been struck by vehicles.

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  • TGTool
    replied
    I've had two very different chipper experiences. Our next door neighbor had a tree service, and one time with a bunch of branches down he came over with the truck and chipper and helped clear it out. Besides wearing the safety equipment (ears and eyes) he explained the best technique for feeding the chipper. That is, you had your branch in hand, you'd sling it into the rollers and continue a pivot almost 180 degrees. The reason was that it sucked the trash in FAST and if you stood still you'd be whipped badly with the small ends of the branch. That worked really well.

    So sometime later he'd moved and we had more stuff to chip so rented one from the local rental outfit. No need to sling and pivot, you could poke a piece in and stand with your coffee while it thought about chewing it up. When I took it back I commented and the rental outfit said, yeah, they'd slowed the feed way down. I can understand that for safety reasons with the inexperienced, but a nice side benefit for them was was that you needed a lot longer to chip the pile.

    Leave a comment:

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