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Drinking water safe materials?

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    How much of this adapter will there be? I made one years ago for a filter we have, and the adapter has so little surface area in contact with water that the faucet itself will contribute 100x more to the water than the adapter ever could.
    Of course you are right.
    I would have just made the adapter of any new piece of brass I have. Minuscule amount of lead isn't an issue.

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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Boy Howdy, the lead worry and mention of flint reminds me Michigan has had some doozies, at least the flint fiasco was contained to flint, how many remember the great PBB debacle? accidentally mixing the chemical into the animal feed supply as a healthy "supplement"... one of the worst mass poisonings of all time, thousands of cattle pigs sheep all executed and buried in a clay pit in an attempt to contain the toxic juices... that was the exact time i stopped drinking milk and eating dairy of any kind...

    https://www.circleofblue.org/2018/wo...ns-pbb-crisis/

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  • jmm03
    replied
    what type of material are you going to tee off of, and why not put an appropriate filter on that can clean the water to your needs? Jim

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  • epicfail48
    replied
    Originally posted by outlawspeeder View Post
    I did not know that. I was taught lead paint was sweet and the reason kids ate it....
    That parts actually true, ask the Romans. Lead acetate was used as a sweetener in ye olden times, the Romans made a drink called sapa using it

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  • outlawspeeder
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Even leaded brass is fine.
    The lead almost immediately forms lead oxide
    and lead oxide is not harmful to humans.
    The trouble with Flint Michigan is the treatment plant
    put the wring chemicals in the water, and it dissolved
    the lead oxide, and the pure lead was leaching off
    and poisoning people.

    -Doozer
    Doozer

    I did not know that. I was taught lead paint was sweet and the reason kids ate it...
    Lead oxide? 50/50 solder lead / tin ... when used on copper pipes, does that get lead oxide over it and will it make it safe? Not trying to be a smart ass. I asking because I don't know. The next question is with hard water, and water softener, does it remove the oxide?

    I don't have plans on testing this by using 50/50 on my drinking water, just trying to learn.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    How much of this adapter will there be? I made one years ago for a filter we have, and the adapter has so little surface area in contact with water that the faucet itself will contribute 100x more to the water than the adapter ever could.

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    I'd be more concerned with possible leached chemicals from any type of plastic.
    If the filter is half decent, you should be able to make an adapter from pure lead and still be safe.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I remember when we would run the water for several seconds before filling a drinking glass- the idea was that you would be purging water that had been sitting in the pipes. Seemed like a good idea to me, and I still do it. As far as the plastic- being resistant to chlorine would make me feel better. Our water never used to have chlorine, but then the carcass of a bear was found in a creek feeding our water supply, and chlorine- or some derivative- is mandatory. Yes, I'd want my fittings to be impervious to it.

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  • Jerrythepilot
    replied
    Any brass would be fine. The surface area in contact with the water is minimal, and it's not in contact with water except while the tap is on, again, a minimal amount of time. Good luck with your project, and please post a pic when your done!

    Jerry

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    The copolymer isn't sensitive to chlorine like the homopolymer. Most tapwater is chlorinated.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    PH of water is supposed to be held at around 9 or 9.5 to minimize the solubility of lead. If they did not even do that, they really screwed up (but we knew that).

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  • garyhlucas
    replied
    They didn't actually add anything to the water in Flint. What they did was switch to a different source for the water that was very acidic, and then didn't correct the pH so it leached the lead from the pipes. RO water will do the same thing at a pH of 7 because it is so pure.

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  • MTNGUN
    replied
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    Of course I would now ask why copolymer would be better?
    Me, too. A backgrounder here: https://weeklypellet.com/2016/08/19/...s-homopolymer/

    And here: https://www.hardiepolymers.com/knowl...-or-copolymer/

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  • darryl
    replied
    I would have said acetal too, but not knowing which polymer would be most suitable. Thanks Toolguy for clearing that up. Of course I would now ask why copolymer would be better?

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    The copolymer is the better choice.

    Leave a comment:

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