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Let’s talk hole saws

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  • Let’s talk hole saws

    Not to hijack the spade but thread. Here is a quote from that thread by me.

    Originally posted by oxford View Post
    It is also better to “shim” the hole saw to the arbor so it sits tight and the drive pins still engage.
    I have found that having the hole saw tight to the arbor and the drive pins engaged is best. Anyone that has used a hole saw before knows the chances of that happening by simply screwing it on isn’t going to happen. It will never bottom out tight and have the pins engage.

    I usually just say screw it and deal with whatever it is. Sometimes I will get out the shim kit and get it to screw down tight and get the pins to engage. This works but is somewhat time consuming.

    There has to be a better way. What are you guys using for hole saw arbors?


  • #2
    I see no reason to go to the trouble to make or install shims. If you willing to cut a hole with a hole saw, It's unlikely your concerned with accuracy to begin with.
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
    Oregon Coast

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lugnut View Post
      I see no reason to go to the trouble to make or install shims. If you willing to cut a hole with a hole saw, It's unlikely your concerned with accuracy to begin with.
      It’s not about accuracy, they do indeed cut much better and prolong the life of the hole saw while cutting through metal when not loose and rattling along. You need to think of it as a circular band saw. The way it is on a hole saw really wouldn’t be acceptable on a normal band saw.

      Cutting wood I haven’t noticed a problem with regular arbor mounting method.

      Have you ever tried one method vs the other?

      I do agree with you though that cutting with a hole saw in the first place, accuracy isn’t a concern. A lot of times it’s just a big hole to start with before the boring head comes out.
      Last edited by oxford; 10-09-2021, 12:02 AM.

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      • #4
        Just a passing thought, I haven’t tried it, don’t know if it will work but wrap some solid heavy solder around the arbor allowing the solder to crush a bit till the holes line up??

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        • #5
          deleted and moved
          Last edited by J Tiers; 10-09-2021, 09:50 PM.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #6
            as far as I'm concerned hole saws in metal suck. Constant retraction and cleaning needed, even with chip holes drilled around the cut, have to go slooooow or they chatter like a mofo. I'd almost rather chain drill and clean up with a hand file. Now annular cutters on the other hand, what a joy to use. Just need to marry a rich woman so I can get some more...

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            • #7
              Deleted and moved
              Last edited by J Tiers; 10-09-2021, 09:50 PM.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #8
                Another thing I do is to drill a 1/4” hole in the work piece. Then take out the pilot bit and put in a piece of 1/4” cold roll or a long 1/4” bolt shank.
                the pilot bit breaks too easily when it gets in a bind. The cold roll is more forgiving.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by true temper View Post
                  Another thing I do is to drill a 1/4” hole in the work piece. Then take out the pilot bit and put in a piece of 1/4” cold roll or a long 1/4” bolt shank.
                  the pilot bit breaks too easily when it gets in a bind. The cold roll is more forgiving.
                  X2 on that,I never have the drill bit in the hole saw arbor,only shafting like you mentioned I predrill hole first.

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like either some of you are having a bad experience with hole saws in metal, or I've had good luck with them. I only buy brand names, and HSS. I put one through hell, cutting over 200 half holes in steel tubing- but I did make up a special arbor for the mill to hold the hole saw rigidly. I think that's key to the whole thing- a proper holder.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      If using a mill or drill press make threaded arbors with a shoulder and screw them in permanently, there is no reason to ever run a hole saw in reverse rotation (-:

                      If your mill has through spindle coolant capability drill coolant holes through the arbor.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                        as far as I'm concerned hole saws in metal suck. Constant retraction and cleaning needed, even with chip holes drilled around the cut, have to go slooooow or they chatter like a mofo...
                        I don’t have the retraction and cleaning issue when I drill chip holes in the workpiece. Going through 1”+ plate isn’t a problem with chips. I would lift a couple time to put some cutting oil on but would see no need if some sort of coolant would be used.

                        As far a chatter, they do some and making the saw tight to the arbor reduces this.

                        For reference here are the “hole saws” I am referring to your standard basic bi-metal hole saw.




                        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

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                        • #13
                          What kind of accuracy do you expect to get out of that type of hole saw ?? In a good rigid set us such as a mill you might get good repeatability but if your trying to achieve hole dia. acuracy... forget it. That type of hole saw runs terribly eccentric and always cut way over size compounded by the error you pick up with the hex shaft and your drill chuck.

                          I've cut dozens of holes in stainless sheet with the same bi metal saw, the key to longevity of the saw is slow speed to reduce chatter and heat.

                          If you want precision holes with repeatable accuracy you have to go to something like this.

                          Click image for larger version

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                          JL...............

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                            What kind of accuracy do you expect to get out of that type of hole saw ??
                            Im not sure where the idea of getting accuracy out of this came from? I never mention that’s what I was trying to achieve.

                            I use these for a cheap way of getting big holes into things that aren’t all that important. If accuracy matters the boring head comes out or it goes in the lathe.



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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oxford View Post

                              Im not sure where the idea of getting accuracy out of this came from? I never mention that’s what I was trying to achieve.

                              I use these for a cheap way of getting big holes into things that aren’t all that important. If accuracy matters the boring head comes out or it goes in the lathe.


                              Well, I just threw that in from past experience. There's nothing wrong with the method and I've never found one of those hole saw bottom out on the arbor where the pins line up. Some closer than others. That's just the way they are, use them as is.
                              I've never heard any plumbers complain about how they fit when they were cutting holes through floor joists.

                              JL................

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