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Hole saw ID? What are they really intended for?

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  • #16
    They are aircraft hole saws for use on aluminum sheet metal. I used them in the industry. And yes, they are used in a hand-held air drill.
    Bob

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    • #17
      Originally posted by bobm4360 View Post
      They are aircraft hole saws for use on aluminum sheet metal. I used them in the industry. And yes, they are used in a hand-held air drill.
      Bob
      Ah, thanks. That makes good sense with aircraft industry here.
      2730

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Everything not impossible is compulsory

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      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        That also makes sense because with "McBoeing-Boeing" plant here there is a fair bit of aluminum machining in various local subs, and appropriate tooling is all over.

        Still surprised they seemed sharp and backed-off correctly but would not cut the 7075.
        They look like the sort of thing that would be used by an aircraft factory and then sold off as scrap..... I sure do miss the tool room at their old surplus store....

        If you have a very high magnification device perhaps inspect the teeth a bit more closely. They may feel sharp but perhaps the previous use has put a flat "no clearance angle" micro land of wear just at the edge? That would certainly cause it to feel sharp but not want to cut.

        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #19
          22" circular blade with only 5 teeth
          !!!! I'd like to see that. Also, would like to see such a thing in action. 22" diameter with 5 teeth is over 1 ft between teeth. Must run pretty fast relative to feed rate for that to work.
          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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          • #20
            The best thing to do with the arbors before they're ruined is to grind or mill flats for holding in a drill chuck. I have a bunch of arbors along with those type hole saws and most of the arbors are chewed up from spinning in drill chucks. A couple of yours show signs of having spun in chucks,

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            • #21
              Yes, several look like it. One has flats already (the one with the drill). I've put in a 1/4" rod as a pilot before, and it obviously stalls the drill without slipping.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #22
                I would have guessed them to be for plexiglass and lexan. For that you'd want tiny flats on the teeth so they wouldn't dig in. Maybe the same for thin aluminum-
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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