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Best type of reamer for opening a snowblower tire wheel from 7/8 to 1"?

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  • Best type of reamer for opening a snowblower tire wheel from 7/8 to 1"?

    Since I can't unmount the tire myself I need to freehand ream the wheel. Is there a best type of reamer for this, straight, twist, or some other flavor? I think trying it with a 1" Silver & Deming will just get me a messy triangular hole.

    I guess alternatively, is there a way to mount/unmount these tires DIY? The old wheels are the proper size but the new tires came with wrong size wheels. I tried to get a local shop to do it last year, but the guy was total ass.
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

  • #2
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post
    ... I tried to get a local shop to do it last year, but the guy was total ass.
    Because you are really asking a lot.
    I would do the job, but charge $500.
    And I would not guarantee any tolerance.
    I think you should try it and report back
    your results. I get the feeling you believe
    it is easier than the actual effort required
    to pull off what you are requesting.

    -D
    Last edited by Doozer; 10-11-2021, 05:23 PM.
    DZER

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    • #3
      Reamers are intended to take out a few thou, to finish a hole to size. They ain't meant to hog out 1/8".
      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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      • #4
        Break the bead and then they're easy to get off the old rims. *Get some inner tubes as they most likely won't seal on the new rims.

        Forget about reaming the wheel. The bore is too long and too much stock has to be removed to use a reamer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post

          Because you are really asking a lot.
          I would do the job, but charge $500.
          And I would not guarantee any tolerance.
          I think you should try it and report back
          your results. I get the feeling you believe
          it is easier than the actual effort required
          to pull off what you are requesting.

          -D
          I think you misunderstand, I was just asking the guy to unmount the tires and mount them on the old wheels.
          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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          • #6
            Originally posted by I make chips View Post
            Break the bead and then they're easy to get off the old rims. *Get some inner tubes as they most likely won't seal on the new rims.

            Forget about reaming the wheel. The bore is too long and too much stock has to be removed to use a reamer.
            The wheel is made in 2 stamped pieces and the hole isn't continuous, like maybe 1/2" on either plate.

            Is it really that easy to remount those little tires? it looks like a hassle because there's so little rim to stretch. What, just 2 flat screwdrivers? The old tires already have tubes since they leaked like MFers.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              An ironworker's tapered bridge reamer would do it, you would need a large wrench... check eBay for a used one and touch up the edges with a small stone. Also known as a construction reamer, used to line up the holes in I-beams. They are usually turned by hand, and abused by the uncaring. You are supposed to run it all the way thru the hole till full-sized. Example: https://www.ebay.com/itm/38299815470...0AAOSwa5tc2IX3
              Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 10-11-2021, 06:00 PM.
              25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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              • #8
                You can't deflate and compress the tire enough to get a bite on the rim with the lathe chuck jaws?
                Clamp it to the mill table with two strap clamps, rim supported by three spacers and bore it out.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                  You can't deflate and compress the tire enough to get a bite on the rim with the lathe chuck jaws?
                  Clamp it to the mill table with two strap clamps, rim supported by three spacers and bore it out.
                  Lathe is a 10". I guess the boring might work, but so much hassle! I might as well try a 1" S&D bit I have, might make a mess but these wheels are trash to me anyway with the wrong bore. Worst case I have to go back to the ass with the lawn care shop and get him to change the wheels to the old ones.
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

                    Lathe is a 10". I guess the boring might work, but so much hassle! I might as well try a 1" S&D bit I have, might make a mess but these wheels are trash to me anyway with the wrong bore. Worst case I have to go back to the ass with the lawn care shop and get him to change the wheels to the old ones.
                    Set up on the mill table, drill to 15/16", bore to 1.00"

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                    • #11
                      Use a stepdrill.

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                      • #12
                        I vote for the bridge reamer. Cheaper and more crude...if you have a 1" multi flute counter sink, you might get it done with a hand drill ? Guys here would turn it on a lathe, or bore on a mill with a head or endmill. Just saying ?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by no704 View Post
                          Use a stepdrill.
                          X2 on this or go at it with a grinder or a file. You have no need for a close tolerance here.

                          lg
                          no neat sig line

                          near Salem OR

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                          • #14
                            I like that one. Step drills are self centering and make very round holes. You can probably do it in a drill press - a large one, at least.

                            If this is beyond your shop's capability, I have all that is needed. I can even run a 1" reamer down the holes after using a 25mm step drill. The 25mm size (0.984") takes it to the range of the 1" reamer and can probably reach both sides at once, keeping the two sides concentric.

                            I am not greedy like Doozer. $100 and you pay shipping both ways.

                            But I think I have given you enough to do it yourself.



                            Originally posted by no704 View Post
                            Use a stepdrill.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                            • #15
                              I think I've chased this squirrel up the wrong tree. Almost every option except using what I have on hand or taking them to the mower guy ends up costing more than reordering the wheels. Never mind!
                              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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