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Best type of reamer for opening a snowblower tire wheel from 7/8 to 1"?

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    This is a snowblower, right? Am I correct in assuming that it won't be used at highway speeds?

    I'd just drill it out with a 1" drill and, if necessary, clean it up a bit with a rat tail file. These wheels will probably never travel more than five miles in their lives - you don't need a perfect fit.

    -js
    Many snowblowers have a cross drilled hole in the rim which is used with a pin to engage that wheel to drive, goes through the rim and the axle. That way it can be setup for either one wheel or two wheel drive, one wheel maneuvers easier, two wheel drive pushes harder. Something has to fix the wheel to the axle to transfer power.

    Ones I have seen do not have enough "meat" to allow them to be opened up and the new rim might not have the cross hole either. Much better idea to use the OEM rim and mount a new tire.
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 10-11-2021, 09:11 PM.

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  • Jim Stewart
    replied
    This is a snowblower, right? Am I correct in assuming that it won't be used at highway speeds?

    I'd just drill it out with a 1" drill and, if necessary, clean it up a bit with a rat tail file. These wheels will probably never travel more than five miles in their lives - you don't need a perfect fit.

    -js

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post
    I think I've chased this squirrel up the wrong tree.
    Nah, she just wasn't interested!

    Seriously, there has got to be a way to do it. Curious as to why you can't unmount it? At my work, they unmount semi tires with a real big hammer. Yep, a guy with a BFH. And a crowbar. Of course if the old tire is junk, I prefer to use a sawzall. Just cut it crosswise off the rim. .. laziness it the mother of invention!

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  • Jerrythepilot
    replied
    Buy a set of tire spoons, watch a YouTube video, change your tire. Maybe a new tube in case you pinch the tube. It happens. Patch it or replace it and move on.

    Jerry

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  • gellfex
    replied
    I think I've chased this squirrel up the wrong tree. Almost every option except using what I have on hand or taking them to the mower guy ends up costing more than reordering the wheels. Never mind!

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I like that one. Step drills are self centering and make very round holes. You can probably do it in a drill press - a large one, at least.

    If this is beyond your shop's capability, I have all that is needed. I can even run a 1" reamer down the holes after using a 25mm step drill. The 25mm size (0.984") takes it to the range of the 1" reamer and can probably reach both sides at once, keeping the two sides concentric.

    I am not greedy like Doozer. $100 and you pay shipping both ways.

    But I think I have given you enough to do it yourself.



    Originally posted by no704 View Post
    Use a stepdrill.

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  • larry_g
    replied
    Originally posted by no704 View Post
    Use a stepdrill.
    X2 on this or go at it with a grinder or a file. You have no need for a close tolerance here.

    lg
    no neat sig line

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  • Fasturn
    replied
    I vote for the bridge reamer. Cheaper and more crude...if you have a 1" multi flute counter sink, you might get it done with a hand drill ? Guys here would turn it on a lathe, or bore on a mill with a head or endmill. Just saying ?

    Attached Files

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  • no704
    replied
    Use a stepdrill.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    Lathe is a 10". I guess the boring might work, but so much hassle! I might as well try a 1" S&D bit I have, might make a mess but these wheels are trash to me anyway with the wrong bore. Worst case I have to go back to the ass with the lawn care shop and get him to change the wheels to the old ones.
    Set up on the mill table, drill to 15/16", bore to 1.00"

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
    You can't deflate and compress the tire enough to get a bite on the rim with the lathe chuck jaws?
    Clamp it to the mill table with two strap clamps, rim supported by three spacers and bore it out.
    Lathe is a 10". I guess the boring might work, but so much hassle! I might as well try a 1" S&D bit I have, might make a mess but these wheels are trash to me anyway with the wrong bore. Worst case I have to go back to the ass with the lawn care shop and get him to change the wheels to the old ones.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    You can't deflate and compress the tire enough to get a bite on the rim with the lathe chuck jaws?
    Clamp it to the mill table with two strap clamps, rim supported by three spacers and bore it out.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    An ironworker's tapered bridge reamer would do it, you would need a large wrench... check eBay for a used one and touch up the edges with a small stone. Also known as a construction reamer, used to line up the holes in I-beams. They are usually turned by hand, and abused by the uncaring. You are supposed to run it all the way thru the hole till full-sized. Example: https://www.ebay.com/itm/38299815470...0AAOSwa5tc2IX3
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 10-11-2021, 06:00 PM.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by I make chips View Post
    Break the bead and then they're easy to get off the old rims. *Get some inner tubes as they most likely won't seal on the new rims.

    Forget about reaming the wheel. The bore is too long and too much stock has to be removed to use a reamer.
    The wheel is made in 2 stamped pieces and the hole isn't continuous, like maybe 1/2" on either plate.

    Is it really that easy to remount those little tires? it looks like a hassle because there's so little rim to stretch. What, just 2 flat screwdrivers? The old tires already have tubes since they leaked like MFers.

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post

    Because you are really asking a lot.
    I would do the job, but charge $500.
    And I would not guarantee any tolerance.
    I think you should try it and report back
    your results. I get the feeling you believe
    it is easier than the actual effort required
    to pull off what you are requesting.

    -D
    I think you misunderstand, I was just asking the guy to unmount the tires and mount them on the old wheels.

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