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Northern LIghts.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    That sound you here when viewing the Northern Lights is just the "Ohhhhhs" and "Ahhhhhhs" from southerners seeing the lights for the first time. 😉

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  • aostling
    replied
    The sound from the auroras has now been explained. https://www.nbcnews.com/science/scie...ights-rcna2840

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    Just a heads up for those that are able to sometimes see the northern lights.
    An intense solar storm this past Thursday will offer a very good chance of seeing some intense displays both tonight and tomorrow night.
    Fortunately skies will be clear here locally. Now if I can just stay awake long enough.

    Check this site later tonight to see what your chances are:

    https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/a...inute-forecast
    No activity here in 60N Finland but it looks like NOAA website overloaded

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Just a heads up for those that are able to sometimes see the northern lights.
    An intense solar storm this past Thursday will offer a very good chance of seeing some intense displays both tonight and tomorrow night.
    Fortunately skies will be clear here locally. Now if I can just stay awake long enough.

    Check this site later tonight to see what your chances are:

    https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/a...inute-forecast

    Last edited by Willy; 10-30-2021, 10:43 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Anyone in the US: Now is time to keep your eyes open. Unusually high solar activity forecasted for the night.
    https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/n...es/6197004001/

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by Arcane View Post
    Yep. They are also known as aurora australis.
    And they are not commonly talked about because nobody lives in south after 55S.
    Southern hemisphere is empty ocean and antarctic.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    I wonder if there is such a thing as southern lights?
    Yep. They are also known as aurora australis.

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  • plunger
    replied
    I wonder if there is such a thing as southern lights?. What happened to Evan now that his name was brought up.

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  • YukonHam
    replied
    Certainly know of it, not TOO far from here - we're near Whitehorse, YT - 60.77N, 135.12 W. Been to a fair number of mine sites around the Territory, but not to Clinton Creek.

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  • Arcane
    replied
    FYI...Clinton Creek where I was at for a year is 64.4014° N, 140.5986° W. or 64° 26' 54'' North , 140° 43' 14'' West.

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  • YukonHam
    replied
    Point taken Matti - I didn't initially read it the same as you. My reaction was prompted by thinking of the folks in your part of the world - like (too?) many in N. America, I don't always appreciate how far north the Scandinavian countries really are.

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  • MattiJ
    replied
    Originally posted by YukonHam View Post


    Nope - Evan wasn't even close to being the northernmost poster on this site - his place in the interior was around 52 degrees N (if I recall correctly). I'm just over 60N, and I think there are others farther north than me.

    I have occasionally heard a 'hiss' that I think might be the aurora, but very rarely. I don't see the lights here in our part of the Yukon quite as much as when we were in Yellowknife, NWT. In good years there, they seemed to be so low it appeared you could reach them with a short stick. Used to worry the tourists getting off the plane (no loading bridge, just outside stairs) would get distracted and walk into a propeller.

    Most amazing view is from a small(-ish) plane - twin engine turboprop at -40 or so - seems to touch the wings at times.
    I read mickeyf's posting as "Evan was northernmost in BC".
    BC border is drawn at 60N so safe to say we have members from farther north if you look outside of BC.
    Docnickel? is from somewhere around Anchorage, I have been living half of my life 65N and currently living 60.3N
    Anything below polar circle is "south" for me.
    DennisCA is probably somewhere 63N.
    And if you start poll who is currently most northern member there is a good change for someone showing up from Finland/Sweden/Norway between 66N to 70N
    Last edited by MattiJ; 10-16-2021, 09:35 AM.

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  • RB211
    replied
    I loved seeing them from the airplane, but I rarely go far North anymore. The 777 simply doesn't need to stop in Anchorage, and I spend most of my time now flying the South Pacific. I have seen two satellites deorbit while flying in Northern Australia which is like watching a shooting star that lasts a few seconds. Pretty darn cool.

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  • YukonHam
    replied
    Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
    Which does make sense... but... apparently there is more to it. Interestingly, of the members of this forum who live in BC, Evan was probably the northernmost in addition to being into astronomy, and would have had more opportunities to see them first hand. A bit too far south here, often too cloudy, and too much light pollution.

    Nope - Evan wasn't even close to being the northernmost poster on this site - his place in the interior was around 52 degrees N (if I recall correctly). I'm just over 60N, and I think there are others farther north than me.

    I have occasionally heard a 'hiss' that I think might be the aurora, but very rarely. I don't see the lights here in our part of the Yukon quite as much as when we were in Yellowknife, NWT. In good years there, they seemed to be so low it appeared you could reach them with a short stick. Used to worry the tourists getting off the plane (no loading bridge, just outside stairs) would get distracted and walk into a propeller.

    Most amazing view is from a small(-ish) plane - twin engine turboprop at -40 or so - seems to touch the wings at times.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Yes, know what you mean.
    One of the most spectacular ones in recent memory was what one can imagine it would look like when laying on your back in a stream and looking up to see the light bending from the ripples in the water flowing from one horizon to the other. Absolutely incredible.

    Leave a comment:

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