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What do I have here?--Electric

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  • What do I have here?--Electric

    My son is a garage door technician and he recently upgraded an older house with new garage door openers. He brought the old ones to me, and I disassembled them to see if there was anything I could use. I'm not really sure what I have here. There is obviously a motor, with four wires, green, red, yellow and blue going into it, a large cylindrical thing that has "Baldor s53-330, 53-64 mfd, and 330vac" printed on it, and also a small transformer. I was hoping to maybe scrounge an electric motor, but there are a lot of parts here that I don't understand.----Brian
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    The cylinder is a capacitor--probably a start capacitor for the motor. The transformer is probably to give the low voltage for the remote operator switch.

    Ed
    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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    • #3
      The motor with its capacitor is useful - and it is bi-directional. The transformer is just to power the receiver board, but it too is useful.

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      • #4
        I can see the wiring diagram on the motor label
        and the cap looks to be already wired to the motor.
        What are you asking ?? ?

        -D
        DZER

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        • #5
          motor and start cap together are handy -- looks like a real useful size for desktop toys!
          transformer by itself is handy for random projects
          looks like you have some relays and wire connectors on the other (vertical) steel part?
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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          • #6
            Doozer--I was hoping to find a nice simple two wire motor that I might salvage and use on something. This motor has many more wires and a bunch of other things tied into it. I'm just trying to find out whether I can use this or not.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              The capacitor needs to stay with the motor of course. But it could be hidden in a little sheet metal camel back box or kept close by. The RPM at 1000 is an oddball number. It suggests more poles than usual but with more torque than the usual 1730 or 3450 RPM motors. Just the sort of thing needed for a garage door of course. And as mentioned it's bidirectional. Which may be a handy feature for some shop uses that justifies the need to make up a protective housing for the capacitor and extra wiring. It's your call on that.

              The rated current of 4.5 amps suggests that it's good for up around a half HP or so for safe continuous use.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                . . .The rated current of 4.5 amps suggests that it's good for up around a half HP or so for safe continuous use.
                That could be true for turn on and leave it, but nearly all overhead door motors are severely limited on start/stop per hour. They'll overheat if, say, one of the grand kids finds the button and gets a kick out of watching the door go up and down. So, if your perceived use for this bi-directional motor is something that will require frequent start/stop/reverse, you'll have to derate the power accordingly.

                Southwest Utah

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                • #9
                  I wonder if you could use the motor for a generator and hook it up to one of your engines
                  just counter-bore and loctite some neo magnets into the rotor et voila!
                  25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                  • #10
                    If the entire works is there, you have a reversible motor with both a remote control (radio) and a hard wired reversing switch. The ones I've seen are geared down and often run a sprocket with chain. Could be used for raising/lowering a large drill press table, although I don't see the remote being involved in that. In any case your son will be able to tell you exactly how to wire it.
                    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                      Doozer--I was hoping to find a nice simple two wire motor that I might salvage and use on something. This motor has many more wires and a bunch of other things tied into it. I'm just trying to find out whether I can use this or not.
                      Of course you can use it! I suggest snipping that cable tie and spreading it all out so you/we can see what is what.

                      As already suggested, the transformer is probably for the remote which you might like to test as you might need a remote controlled motor for something, just don't cut anything till we know what is what.

                      Those contacts on the side of the box are probably the end of travel switch and the big relay with all the wires is probably the reversing circuit.

                      So, spread it all out, without cutting any wires and photograph what you have!

                      John

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                      • #12
                        Capacitor run motor.
                        2 wires not possible.

                        -D
                        DZER

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post

                          That could be true for turn on and leave it, but nearly all overhead door motors are severely limited on start/stop per hour. They'll overheat if, say, one of the grand kids finds the button and gets a kick out of watching the door go up and down. So, if your perceived use for this bi-directional motor is something that will require frequent start/stop/reverse, you'll have to derate the power accordingly.
                          Very true... very true.... 4.5 amps at 115v is 517 watts though. I'm thinking that half a horse ( around 370 watts) of load should be enough derating to get by. Especially if the motor isn't installed in a closed box as is normal for openers. And of course when not actually loaded with some work the running current would be a lot less. So I still suspect that loading it up to around a half horse worth of current of use should be OK.

                          So, spread it all out, without cutting any wires and photograph what you have!

                          John
                          Yep, that! Once you consider that the four wires to the capacitor and the capacitor are simply part of the motor then you can focus on just the other wires that extend from the motor. That should cut down on much of the apparent confusion.
                          Last edited by BCRider; 10-13-2021, 03:19 PM.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            I used a GDO motor with its built-in worm drive as an up-down motor on a 3n1 mod I did about 15 yrs ago.
                            Mine was off a chain drive and IIRC the motor was rated either ~800 rpm or 1100 rpm into the worm. Using a ~34 tooth
                            cog off an old bicycle free wheel driven by the 7t cog on the worm output shaft the GDO motor runs the
                            ~200 lb 3n1 milling machine head up and down at ~20 sec/in over a 12" range.

                            The 'other parts' in the box are the logic board and receiver for the remote control and the mechanical
                            switches that control the max up and down for the door and the soft stop mechanism that stops the
                            door descending when it hits an animal or child plus the photoelectic sensors for an obstruction near
                            the floor.
                            Last edited by sch; 10-13-2021, 04:06 PM.
                            Steve

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                            • #15
                              If I read e label on the e motor right there are 4 wires - red blue yellow and white
                              the label seems to inply
                              white is the neutral (which is standard ac/house wiring practice iirc)
                              yellow looks to be unconncted - where does it go?
                              blue and white look to be the hots - connect to one of them and the motor goes one way, connect to the other and the motor goes the other way

                              but I could be wrong

                              frank

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