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What do I have here?--Electric

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  • #16
    At the very least you've got something you can toss in a rubbermaid that will hold it down to the floor/shelf for a couple years .

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    • #17
      Nothing says you can't run it one direction only- though I don't know what use you'd put it to. Even unloaded, those motors will overheat after several minutes of constant running. They are useful as intermittent servo motors- open and close a door, run something up and down, etc. Maybe run a worm gear box set up as a winch for lifting in the shop-
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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      • #18
        What you have, as noted, is a useful small motor with it's correct capacitor. Plus other useful bits.

        What would help a lot is a good closeup of the motor label so we can see the information on it. That is going to help ID what it is and how much of the stuff it needs to work.

        The motor will end up with 2 wires going to the "assembly", so all that's needed is to ID the needed bits to determine what the "internal connections" of the "assembly" need to be. With any luck, the motor tag will actually have that info, looks like it may.
        2730

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Everything not impossible is compulsory

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        • #19
          Brian wants a 2 wire motor.
          That's it.
          And I understand that.
          He is not dumb.
          That is just what he wants.
          I want a car without fuel injection.
          Just a carb and a distributor.
          Am I dumb?
          No.
          Can I fix fuel injected cars?
          HeII yes. I have many times,
          more than I want to.
          So I want a carburetor.
          Freaking simple.
          Just because I can
          does not mean I want to.
          I suspect Brian has reasons
          for his wishes. I bet he can
          wire a complicated motor.
          Bur he just does not want to,
          And I can completely see that.
          People come off saying,,,,
          Why not this and why not that.
          Because that's not what I want.
          That's why. People can't see
          others point of view. People
          can't respect other people's
          reasons. Brian likes what
          Brian likes and so do I.
          I don't try to understand why.
          I just accept it. It is called
          respect.

          --Doozer
          DZER

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          • #20
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            . . .Even unloaded, those motors will overheat after several minutes of constant running. . .
            You'd be surprised to see how many of them don't even have a fan!

            Southwest Utah

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            • #21
              From what is visible in the image, the motor is a Westinghouse E322P737A, 1/3 HP, 115V, 60Hz, 4.5A, Intermittent duty. The white wire appears to be neutral, and the red and blue wires connect via an SPDT switch to the line for FWD/REV. The red and blue wires also connect to the capacitor, as expected. It is 53-64 uF and 330 VAC. The yellow wire connects to the small transformer, which also has white and black wires. The purpose is unclear. There is probably a reduction gear train in the metal box, along with limit and reversing switches.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

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              • #22
                Is the gearbox OK? That would be what would be interesting to me. Just curious.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #23
                  There is no gearbox. Only a small v-pulley driving a large pulley.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #24
                    The intermittent duty factor sort of kills it. Combine that along with the extra salad of capacitor and wires and I'm now thinking that the use you would be willing to put this too is pretty limited. Likely good for recycling. Or perhaps some sort of function that fits in with its intermittent duty cycle issue and that needs the higher torque of a low RPM motor. If that sounds like "bin the darn thing" I wouldn't blame you.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #25
                      I've been using a 1/3 HP 3 phase "limited duty" closed motor from an overhead door application on the lathe for a dozen years or more. In all that time, it has shut off once, I think.

                      The "limited duty" really means that the motor is either overloaded, or has inadequate cooling, in the application it is used in. That is done in order "to compete with china". Every penny and mil that can be shaved off is shaved off.

                      That one looks like an "air over" motor that is not getting the air.. It will run all day, most likely, if the full power from the door application is not demanded, OR there is air over it.

                      My intermittent duty motor has no air over it (no fan), and is perfectly happy to run the lathe, often with fairly tough cuts. It shut off after about an hour of machining 4140PH with deep cuts, and that's the only time.

                      No reason to run away from that motor just because it is called "limited duty".

                      Oh, yeah.... long ago I received the "stern warning" from several right here on this forum who said that my nice new motor was a limited duty motor and would cause me nothing but trouble. They could have saved the effort and electrons, since it is still working, and working well. If I put a fan on it, it will probably never shut down again.
                      Last edited by J Tiers; 10-14-2021, 06:40 PM.
                      2730

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Everything not impossible is compulsory

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        That is easily a two wire motor. The cap can be wired permanently to the wire which turns the motor the way you want it to run. The 'other direction' wire is just capped and ignored. So one ac wire goes to the remaining motor wire, and the other ac wire goes to the cap- and also to the remaining motor wire if it's a 4 wire motor.

                        I've had several of these things. Mostly what I've found is that the motor is a little small for the power rating, so that's why it's intermittent duty. If you drop the input voltage it would probably run all day, and would have a reduced power output. But that gets a bit complicated as you now need either a transformer, or a variac. You might find it to be ok as is, if you just make sure it has air flow.

                        Almost all the ones I've had use a nylon worm and nylon wheel, with the wheel having a metal sprocket for the chain. And they all came to me complete, so the chain was there, as well as the T-bar. I've used the T-bar more than any other part of the assembly. Just today I tossed some of the remaining parts from the last one I had. All the stuff in the box looks complicated, but really isn't. The limit switch assembly is interesting, but I've never found it useful for anything.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #27
                          Interesting that the overload protection is that relay-contact-thingy on the side of the "gear box" (bimetal finger). Not in the motor as is normal, now. Also the yellow wire from the transformer goes directly into the motor. ???

                          A schematic would tell a lot more than the photo.

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                          • #28
                            Brian, you may find a use for the motor. But bear in mind they are usually intermittent duty as mentioned. For their size they make a lot of power but will overheat if run for a minute or more.
                            Been there done that. I was all happy with a little grinder I powered with one until it started smoking. In the trash it went.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                              Brian, you may find a use for the motor. But bear in mind they are usually intermittent duty as mentioned. For their size they make a lot of power but will overheat if run for a minute or more.
                              Been there done that. I was all happy with a little grinder I powered with one until it started smoking. In the trash it went.
                              Covered that above..... it may run fine when not pulling overload current. And, if provided with a fan, it might run happily.
                              2730

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Everything not impossible is compulsory

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The oddball stuff in the box has to do with the limits and the reversing. Unless you intend to use it as a bi-directional, you can toss that stuff. By the way, the transformer is to generate a small DC voltage to run the electronics to sense the remote signal. It has nothing to do with the motor. And it is continuous duty, so you could probably use it to run a circle light for a mill, or some other led lighting module- perhaps a room light that's always on, so you don't have to feel your way in the dark to find a light switch for example.

                                You always have the option of adding a fan to the motor if need be. Just make something like a metal disc with fingers cut into it and twisted.
                                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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