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Tantalum ?

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  • Toolguy
    replied
    Tantung might work well in that application. We used to use that for hard to deal with stainless alloys.

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  • Fasturn
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

    Thanks, I gotta look that one up. Not familiar with that one. I've worked with loads of inconel and some monel though. And welded stellite (forget about machining that stuff, you can barely even grind it)
    Wow you have machined some of the bad stuff too. Reading between the lines on this site, most have only machined the garden veriety. Kovar is one more like Inconnel high nickel , not nice to mill. I am retired, so brass , aluminum and delrin are what I enjoy to machine. Thanks for reading!
    Last edited by Fasturn; 10-13-2021, 08:03 PM.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasturn View Post

    The high nickel alloys are the worst. Haynes 605 L
    a Nickel / Cobalt was a bad one. You had to have a nice chip breaker ( radius ) to get under it for separation. The flat inserts were worthless for turning. Your buddy was right, I often preferred Mo-max HSS over Cardide.
    Thanks, I gotta look that one up. Not familiar with that one. I've worked with loads of inconel and some monel though. And welded stellite (forget about machining that stuff, you can barely even grind it)

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  • Fasturn
    replied
    Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    I asked the old-timer at work (70 yrs...) how he would do straight nickel based alloys once, he said "M48 HSS". I was amazed, but I didn't get a chance to see how he ground his tools.
    The high nickel alloys are the worst. Haynes 605 L
    a Nickel / Cobalt was a bad one. You had to have a nice chip breaker ( radius ) to get under it for separation. The flat inserts were worthless for turning. Your buddy was right, I often preferred Mo-max HSS over Carbide.
    Last edited by Fasturn; 10-13-2021, 08:00 PM.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    I asked the old-timer at work (70 yrs...) how he would do straight nickel based alloys once, he said "M48 HSS". I was amazed, but I didn't get a chance to see how he ground his tools.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasturn
    replied
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    Sounds kind of like moly or neobium.
    You know it... its soft like copper ( hitting it with hammer ), but cuts like Moly / or Tungsten . Carbide will disintegrate in short order. Does not like to separate with a cutting edge. Very dense, so it's used in Space for faraday sheilding on satelites.

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  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Where possible I would rather use Inconel for hi-temp applications. It's not too bad once you get used to it, I've worked with tons of it. But I imagine the parameters are similar to tantalum. Razor sharp polished carbide or ceramic inserts, aggressive feed, moderate RPM.

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  • gmax137
    replied
    This is the second time today I have read something involving tantalum. The first was in relation to vulcanology and scientific instruments used to probe magma chambers. Ta alloys were suggested as a possible candidate for the >1000C temperatures (that's more than 1830F for us Yanks).

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  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Sounds kind of like moly or neobium.

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  • Fasturn
    started a topic Tantalum ?

    Tantalum ?

    Tantalum has long drawn the ire of machinist, being particularly difficult to cut. Often referred to as being ‘gummy,’ cutting of tantalum is characterized by very thick chips, large cutting forces, and a poor surface finish on the machined surface. So what's your experience with machining this ??
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