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O.T. cost of running a pilot light???

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  • #16
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Having always had (and preferred) stoves with pilot flames,

    I have three in the stove,
    Dont do a Wolf for that unit. I would tak that cook top over a phukin wolf. Just saying.. JR

    Oh? Yeah, I know my cook tops. All of the, even live fire. Hey? Learn to cook..

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    • #17
      --Oh? The riginal question? O.T. cost of running a pilot light???

      No cost whast so ever. Natual gas is the cheapest fuel you can get right now.

      Pilot "lamp" suks so lil fuel you would nbot notice on your natgas bill. Thats small of an impact.. JR

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      • #18
        I used 160.729 M3 of natural gas in September for a cost of C$16.04 . The Federal Carbon Tax cost was C$13.22. I can clearly see the benefit I get from the $16 but the Carbon Tax?

        On a side note...guess what our federal government just spent $600 million on and nothing changed?
        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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        • #19
          I'll bet burning a pilot is a lot less expensive than replacing one of these. https://duckduckgo.com/y.js?ad_provi...DevEx%2C5771.1

          JL.....................

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
            I'll bet burning a pilot is a lot less expensive than replacing one of these.

            JL.....................
            You know that's a good point in two ways,,, think of the electrical energies it takes to use also - there is some wattage there for sure probably just one time surpasses what a pilot light cost to run for 12 or maybe even 24 hours or more?,,, only real bennie is when the unit is inoperable for the summer like with a furnace it costs nothing in comparison to a pilot going for 6 or 7 months just consuming,,, but when needed furnaces can cycle many times a day ---- sometimes dozens if that's the only heat people are using - ouch...

            my focus is with the cook stove because of electronic ignition on the newer ones which is much more efficient than both methods, but like someone already chimed in on --- until you have to replace a circuit board...

            I guess im sticking with my old stove...

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            • #21
              So............. you just leave the furnace "on" with pilot light, all summer?🙄😏
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

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              • #22
                Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

                You know that's a good point in two ways,,, think of the electrical energies it takes to use also - there is some wattage there for sure probably just one time surpasses what a pilot light cost to run for 12 or maybe even 24 hours or more?,,, only real bennie is when the unit is inoperable for the summer like with a furnace it costs nothing in comparison to a pilot going for 6 or 7 months just consuming,,, but when needed furnaces can cycle many times a day ---- sometimes dozens if that's the only heat people are using - ouch...

                my focus is with the cook stove because of electronic ignition on the newer ones which is much more efficient than both methods, but like someone already chimed in on --- until you have to replace a circuit board...

                I guess im sticking with my old stove...
                I don't know what the actual cost of running a pilot is per year. I know people that have gas stoves with five pilots burning all the time plus furnace and hot water tank. So who knows what that amounts to a year. I'm sure it can be researched or the local utility co. could tell you.

                When I put my new boiler in it wouldn't fire right out of the box. I found that the transformer was open. Some cheap chink made transformer with no markings on it, but I found it was open.
                The guy at the store where I bought the boiler sorta didn't believe me and I had to argue with him about it, then someone came out with a VOM and checked it and said yeah, it's bad.
                Put it in and the thing fired up.
                Following year I went to start it and it wouldn't fire. the fault light indicated the problem. Had to replace the glow igniter. It developed a micro crack that I couldn't see but the resistance was high.
                That one was under warranty. The following year same thing happened. Had to replace it again. The the control board started acting up. I tracked that down to bad micro relays. I was able to get it to work for a while but then it would fault again. I called the company and spoke to a tech. I explained to him what was going on. I had asked if I could get replacement relays, his answer was no that no one troubleshoots these boards down to the level that I did. I could have bought them from Mouser or some other place but the guy told me that they had an updated board made by a different mfg. because they had issues with the originals so that cost me a few bucks. I think the original was Honeywell and the replacement was White Rogers. It's been working OK ever since but I hold my breath every time I fire it up for the winter and keep my fingers crossed throughout the winter.
                So yeah, I'd take the old pilot light boilers any day over this POS. This thing cycles on and off probably 30 times a day or more. the core is so small that it doesn't retain any heat. It's basically on demand.

                JL..............

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                • #23
                  To measure the consumption you may have to wait until you are going away for a few days so you can get a few days worth to turn over the meter even one click. Must do that myself sometime.
                  I have recently taken to putting a small pan with lid of water on the hob. The pilot takes it up to luke-warm with which I fill the kettle, only enough for the cups I need. Noticeably quicker to make a cuppa. I also use this available heat for various things that need gentle warming like some glues, syrup, old crystallised honey, the last bit of a carton of ready made custard, drying aple slices and rusks, softening butter, loosening jar lids. the annoying thing is that when the pressure is low turning on the oven (no pilot on that) makes the grill pilot go out.
                  I think my kitchen is a degree or two warmer than other rooms. Perhaps if I went to town on insulation it would save me turning on the heating for another month.
                  Oh, yes final benefit is the cold water tank is above the stove so probably would save a freeze if the house was unoccupied.

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                  • #24
                    Joe you sound like me.
                    A brand new Bryant furnace and central air four years ago. Every flippin year I need a service call as something craps out on it. Why? It's made of 95% china crap components. (assembled in usa)
                    No standing pilot on the new machines.

                    My old furnace ran for 30 years without a glitch and eventually the heat exchanger developed small cracks.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by I make chips View Post
                      Joe you sound like me.
                      A brand new Bryant furnace and central air four years ago. Every flippin year I need a service call as something craps out on it. Why? It's made of 95% china crap components. (assembled in usa)
                      No standing pilot on the new machines.

                      My old furnace ran for 30 years without a glitch and eventually the heat exchanger developed small cracks.
                      Your right. What did we save ?? My old Rheem boiler lasted 40 years before it started to leak and in that time I think my father replaced the thermocoupler once. What you might have saved in efficiency has been wasted on parts and service calls not to mention the aggravation.

                      JL...............

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                      • #26
                        The last time i saw an electronic igniter on an appliance that actually worked as well as a pilot, it was on a 1960's oil burner for a furnace. You have the gigantic HV transformer and a couple of electrodes separated by INCHES directly in the path of the oil spray. Turns out you can still buy the oil burners but they are not cheap. I used to pick them out of the trash when they were common, the igniters were in the 100,000 volt range.
                        25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                        • #27
                          "waving hand frantically" Boomer pick me! Pick me. I have a 100 liquid propane tank and it runs only my 40 gallon hot water heater that is always on just pilot light setting. Uses 80 gallons of propane in each year. Same heater since 1970..... Toasty warm showers every morning
                          www.neufellmachining.com

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                          • #28
                            You might be able to estimate the cost by determining the wattage of the pilot light, which might be about 5 watts. That would be 120 watt-hours every day, and so about 3.6 kW-h in a month. At a nominal cost of 10 cents per kW-h that would be $0.36/month. And since natural gas is cheaper than electricity, it will be less than that.

                            This reminds me of the hubbub about so-called "energy vampires" in the form of "instant-on" appliances and wall-warts, and admonishing people to unplug them unless using them.

                            https://paylesspower.com/blog/vampire-energy/

                            But I was surprised by the first hits I got when googling the term:

                            https://drjudithorloff.com/what-is-an-energy-vampire/

                            https://www.healthline.com/health/me...take-advantage
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                              You might be able to estimate the cost by determining the wattage of the pilot light, which might be about 5 watts. That would be 120 watt-hours every day, and so about 3.6 kW-h in a month. At a nominal cost of 10 cents per kW-h that would be $0.36/month. And since natural gas is cheaper than electricity, it will be less than that.
                              A pilot light produces a lot more than 5 W of heat.

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                              • #30
                                So I guess it's up to me to research that. Apparently a pilot light can be between 70 and 500 watts, although I doubt the higher figure. So, let's say 100 watts, which would be 72 kW-h per month. That would be about $7/month for electric, but probably more like $4 for natural gas.

                                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilot_light

                                My propane gas stove uses electric spark igniters.

                                I figured a pilot light was about equivalent to a candle flame. And apparently a candle flame burns about 80 watts, so the estimate above is about right.

                                https://www.thenakedscientists.com/a...burning-candle
                                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                                USA Maryland 21030

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