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  • #76
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    For those of you that have done some level of production- and I suppose this counts for manual as well- how do you go about "saving a job"?



    Do you just save the program in whatever storage medium you're using, and if the job comes back, rely on memory and the comments in the program to set the machine back up? Do you keep physical drawings? CAD models?



    Doc.
    Some controls will allow you to save text notes and set-up pictures along with the program data.

    Older machines will only allow a numerical program number, in this case keep hand written notes.

    Last edited by Bented; 11-12-2021, 04:59 AM.

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    • #77
      I have job folders setup on the computer. For mill work, I don't save programs, unless there was heavy editing at the control, which I rarely do aside from 4th axis work. I prefer to call the CAM file the master, and repost all the programs again if a job should return. For lathe work I save it all in the control, or post it out to the job folder when done.

      I also take pictures of setups, and any other info that might be handy like tool holders, stock sizes, etc and save that in the job folder.

      I also usually come up with a better way to do it the 2nd time, so the first way go out the window when a job comes back and repeats lol. Or the #'s might be different so an initial run of 20, might turn into 200, or an open order so the methods to machine could change drastically. That's talking about mill work though, lathe stuff is generally the same no matter the quantities.

      I don't do a lot of production, so every little bit helps. I've had jobs come back after a couple years, and I'd swear that I never ran or seen them before, but when digging for info on the server, there they are with my name all over them lol

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      • #78
        I worked at one place where we did a lot of small runs of 5-12 parts that were likely to come back, usually months later. We kept folders with all the G-code and CAM files, as well as a setup sheet. The setup sheets had the axis origins (mill work), the tools, and the order of setups listed. If any fixtures or special tooling was required, it was saved and listed in the setup sheet.

        One thing I learned was don't underestimate your ability to forget – make lots of notes. Stuff that seems readily apparent when you are running the parts may have you scratching your head months later.

        Also, if it's a job you expect to see again, take the time to iron out all the problems on the first run, even the minor things. If you are using the override to slow the feed, go back and change your feedrates in the code. If you have to slow things down in an area because you are taking too big of a DOC, go back and change the program. The time spent tweaking the job the first time will be made up in the second run and then some. Always nice to be able to set up and not have to hover over the operation trying to relearn its peculiarities.
        George
        Traverse City, MI

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        • #79
          Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
          I worked at one place where we did a lot of small runs of 5-12 parts that were likely to come back, usually months later. We kept folders with all the G-code and CAM files, as well as a setup sheet. The setup sheets had the axis origins (mill work), the tools, and the order of setups listed. If any fixtures or special tooling was required, it was saved and listed in the setup sheet.

          One thing I learned was don't underestimate your ability to forget – make lots of notes. Stuff that seems readily apparent when you are running the parts may have you scratching your head months later.

          Also, if it's a job you expect to see again, take the time to iron out all the problems on the first run, even the minor things. If you are using the override to slow the feed, go back and change your feedrates in the code. If you have to slow things down in an area because you are taking too big of a DOC, go back and change the program. The time spent tweaking the job the first time will be made up in the second run and then some. Always nice to be able to set up and not have to hover over the operation trying to relearn its peculiarities.
          That's a great point. I always make the changes to my CAM file of anything I do out at the control while running the parts. I prefer the CAM file to be master, but sometimes hand edits take over for retracts and 4th axis moves I can't integrate into my post processor, so the g code file then becomes master. Document everything. Takes lots of pictures and notes, and pictures of those notes .

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          • #80
            I worked at one place where we did a lot of small runs of 5-12 parts that were likely to come back, usually months later. We kept folders with all the G-code and CAM files, as well as a setup sheet. The setup sheets had the axis origins (mill work), the tools, and the order of setups listed. If any fixtures or special tooling was required, it was saved and listed in the setup sheet.
            -That's pretty much what I came up with. Basically I looked at it and thought, if I had to do this job again, what would I want to know? The name of the program, the drawing so I know what the specs are supposed to be, which tools to use, where the zeroes are, etc. etc.

            I've got a copy in a folder on my desktop, and a hard copy in a 3-ring binder. As this is a very simple 2-axis lathe, I can even print out the program as a text file, and include that in the binder copy.

            Doc.
            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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            • #81
              I grooved 195 pcs of 3/8-16 pentagonal head cap screws today. The groove is .175" wide with a diameter of .281".
              The runtime was 5 seconds per part.



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              • #82
                Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post
                I worked at one place where we did a lot of small runs of 5-12 parts that were likely to come back, usually months later. We kept folders with all the G-code and CAM files,
                Yes, good cover. You Have the original files, Id love to have stacks. Share please. (no really, I could use some of the code) .

                Just to be clear? Home shop Machinist is the site still? I dont know of any folks in my corner of the sunset side that has what should be a screw machine in their Home?

                I am just trying to figure out my parameters? Do I go overboard,? Curious.. JR

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                • #83
                  After Compact II, Fusion 360 and Mastercam 2020 I only need to save ZERO - on my DRO. No improvement needed !!
                  Last edited by Fasturn; 11-14-2021, 12:11 AM.

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                  • #84
                    ... Why pentagonal? Anti-tamper?

                    Doc.
                    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                      ... Why pentagonal? Anti-tamper?

                      Doc.
                      The groove is probably so it snaps if tampered with

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                      • #86
                        Slightly tamper proof but mostly captive, some form of retaining device such as an E-Ring fits in the groove.
                        These are modified for a regional public transportation system.

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post
                          Slightly tamper proof but mostly captive, some form of retaining device such as an E-Ring fits in the groove.
                          These are modified for a regional public transportation system.
                          Yes. I agree, 100%. There is reasoning behind it? JR

                          Hey, you know the metals right?

                          Did you build any rail lines or uch/ I honestly look up to you for any knowledge.

                          You are a Machinist. I applaud Machinists!! With out you we would be no where. Hey, I find it and ask for answers. Ha, A lil knowledge my way please. I could use it, everyone knows that... JR
                          Last edited by JRouche; 11-14-2021, 03:50 AM.

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                          • #88
                            Never worked for the Local, State or Federal government. Worked for a small sailboat manufacturer in the early 80's which built 75 or 80 thirty foot boats before going Tango Uniform.

                            Took an offer from a boat customer with reasonably deep pockets and bummed around the Caribbean Islands for a few years and landed a job as a BN on a large private Yacht that sailed to England for the summer. Hobo'd around Western Europe for 6-8 months or so. Returned to the US in 86 {18 days sailing to England, a 5 hour flight back to NYC, ALWAYS take the plane}.

                            Returned to driving race cars, in my case North East dirt modifieds and opening a machine shop, it has been all downhill from there.

                            Do not become a machinist, keep it as a hobby.

                            My name is neither Ben or Ed or Ted



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                            • #89
                              Hey Doc,

                              What are you using for coolant and how do you like it? I need something that will work well on aluminum and decent enough on steel. Looks like you may have something there. Do you think it would work as a sawing fluid too? Maybe thinned?

                              Thx
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                                What are you using for coolant and how do you like it? I need something that will work well on aluminum and decent enough on steel. Looks like you may have something there. Do you think it would work as a sawing fluid too? Maybe thinned?
                                -It's not coolant, it's cutting oil. Specifically Mobilmet 426. I'd ordered 426 for the turret lathe, and for the Omni, I wanted to try something a touch thinner, so I ordered 424. Only local place to get it was Fastenal, and unfortunately, paying some $100 a bucket just in shipping.

                                One of the many wonderful things about living in Alaska.

                                Anyway, they boogered my order and got me two more buckets of 426. No big, it works just fine, and not sure the thinner viscosity would have gotten me anything. I obviously don't have a lot of experience with it yet, but so far it appears to be working just fine. Neither machine has a particularly fast spindle- 1400 for the turret, and 4K for the CNC and the only thing that's gotten warm, was some stainless I was drilling with an insertable drill. This stuff is NOT a coolant.

                                BUT, for my particular situation, the oil is preferable over a soluble. I won't be running these things regularly- they will, at times, sit unused for a month or more. I'm kind of a jack of all trades, and I'm doing some welding one week, tinkering on paintguns the next week, doing some manufacturing the week after that, and so on.

                                When I had soluble coolant on the old turret (my Logan, prior to the CNC conversion) the reservoir was constantly running dry from evaporation. Wouldn't have been an issue if I used the thing regularly, adding a little water and a touch more oil would just be part of the routine. But I'd come back after even just a couple of weeks, and have to mix up two gallons of fresh.

                                I also didn't like the rust and tarnishing. Again, if one is using the machine regularly, it's often not much of an issue. But leave it for a week, and things start to rust rather badly.

                                So a cutting oil suited my situation better. The only real drawback is that it makes a huge mess if you're not paying attention. Not so much on the CNC, as it's well enclosed. But the turret splashes everywhere, it gets all over the handles and controls, and on both machines, it takes some forethought to control- and reclaim- drippage off of produced parts. I've been trying to gigure out how to set up some parts trays with built in catch trays.

                                Doc.
                                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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