Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How should I cut this slab of aluminum?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How should I cut this slab of aluminum?

    I have to cut a 14" wide (35 cm) by 3/4" thick (2 cm) slab of aluminum about 14" in from the end. This is too big for my Horrible Fright horizontal bandsaw. It's way too much for my hacksaw. I don't have a cold-cutting saw with carbide blade.

    So far my only idea involves mounting the 70" long piece of aluminum on my Bridgeport with the long direction along the Y axis, and then slot-cutting it along the X axis while I hold the wobbly end. Or I could take it to a machine shop, but I'll bet they'll charge a pretty penny...

    If I were "This Old Tony" I'd just mark it with Dykem (the blue is gone from my skin, now), scribing the line, and then allow video magic to do the cut. I am not that clever.


  • #2
    A powerful circular saw with carbide tip blade. At work we had a 14 inch air drive saw. It would cut thru 3 inch 6061 like a piece of wood. If you dont want to buy a saw, take it to your local machine shop and let them saw it?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	4100v38GdHL._AC_SY580_.jpg
Views:	606
Size:	16.9 KB
ID:	1968971
    Last edited by Fasturn; 11-06-2021, 06:10 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      some woodworking tools like skilsaw , circular saw, tablesaw, also work on aluminum.
      BUT, the flying chips are eye hazard, noisy ear hazard
      wear your PPE

      Comment


      • #4
        Yup, regular wood cutting circular saw and carbide blade will cut it.

        You could run it thought a table saw if you have one or standard chop saw from both sides should get it.

        It helps if you can keep some sort of lubricant on it, wd40 seems to work fine.

        Comment


        • #5
          Another vote for a circular saw. Woodworking tools actually work in aluminium just fine, just have to take a little bit more care in how you approach the cut. Make sure the piece is well secured and be prepared to catch some hot chips

          Comment


          • #6
            Throw it on the Bport and quit lollygagging.

            Avg. machine shop will wait till you are gone…..and then throw it on the Bport.

            Comment


            • #7
              If using a circular saw, a worm drive works better than a direct drive, because the blade can't bounce backward, and the motor torque is multiplied.
              Kansas City area

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SVS View Post
                Throw it on the Bport and quit lollygagging.

                Avg. machine shop will wait till you are gone…..and then throw it on the Bport.
                LOL, no machine shop is going to put a 14” wide by 70” long bar on a Bridgeport to cut a 14” long piece off

                Comment


                • #9
                  Circ saw. WD40. Answer has already been said. But I predict this thread will continue on for 50 more posts.
                  21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                  1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bring it on over, my Kalamazoo 8CW will handle it no problem.
                    It's all mind over matter.
                    If you don't mind, it don't matter.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      table saw or circular saw. The challenge with a table saw is to keep the piece from skewing as you push it through the blade. The best purchase I've made in regards to cutting aluminum is a proper blade. I went with a 7-1/2 inch blade so I could use it on either saw, and for my 25$ I got one that does a beautiful job on acrylics, aluminum, plastic laminates.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It all depends on what you have on hand for alternatives to the mill.
                        Personally I have used a table saw, a hand held circular saw, and a sawzall for similar cuts, the Bport slot cut would be my last choice.
                        Use plenty of lube, I used WD40 because that's what I hand on hand, worked great.
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Table saw with a rip fence rather than a hand held circular saw if you care about a straight edge. I also use WD40 when cutting aluminum. If you use a smaller diameter blade than your table saw is designed for (say 7-1/2 vs 10 or 12 in.), the effective cutting speed will be lower, which may be a good thing - but you do want carbide teeth in any case.
                          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

                          Comment


                          • #14


                            (the blue is gone from my skin, now),

                            [/QUOTE]

                            So, the fear of the emergency room has passed !!!!!!
                            I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                            Oregon, USA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                              Table saw with a rip fence rather than a hand held circular saw if you care about a straight edge. I also use WD40 when cutting aluminum. If you use a smaller diameter blade than your table saw is designed for (say 7-1/2 vs 10 or 12 in.), the effective cutting speed will be lower, which may be a good thing - but you do want carbide teeth in any case.
                              Bull! I always use a carbide tipped blade for cutting aluminum. For this job I would use a circular saw. Trying to make a crosscut on a table saw on that long a piece is asking for trouble. You wind up feding it crooked and binding the blade

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X