Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How should I cut this slab of aluminum?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    Circ saw. WD40. Answer has already been said. But I predict this thread will continue on for 50 more posts.
    How many before it turns political? (I favor the circular saw also)
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

    Comment


    • #32
      The hand held circular saw has always been my preferred method of choice, it like a sawzall will make a straighter cut when used with a guide. I simply use a piece of sheet steel to guide the sole plate along.
      The table saw can work well but it obviously needs a bit more work to make it a more friendly, much as mickeyf explained back in post #17.
      These are obvious precautions and procedures to anyone who has ever cross cut a board on a table saw and is doubly important when cutting metal, as is the fact that unlike sawdust metal chips will fly farther and carry heat.

      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
      Circ saw. WD40. Answer has already been said. But I predict this thread will continue on for 50 more posts.
      Just doing my part to help get you into prophet status, not sure how many more orange bars that requires but you're getting close.

      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

        How many before it turns political? (I favor the circular saw also)
        31 posts 😏

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

          Nah I like it too. But, I'd push instead of pull if possible. And I'd return the saw with it off. And clamp the work to the table since the saw is now trying to lift it.
          Hah..... I ALWAYS push the saw on the RAS anyhow. I don't like climb cuts when the cutter is not well controlled............. And it also makes certain that I can complete the cut within the saw head movement available.

          CNC machines only go through the motions

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Willy View Post
            Just doing my part to help get you into prophet status, not sure how many more orange bars that requires but you're getting close.
            Aww. Look at the teamwork!

            Lunch time!
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

              How many before it turns political? (I favor the circular saw also)
              No, before it turns political it will morph into a metric vs imperial cat fight.
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by lynnl View Post

                No, before it turns political it will morph into a metric vs imperial cat fight.
                Son of a gun, you're right !! I had completely forgotten about that...
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                Comment


                • #38
                  Anyone here heard of the Evolution Saw? I don’t have room for a horizontal bandsaw, so I did some research on these and bought one. Absolutely love it! They sell blades for aluminum, stainless and multi-purpose blades. I’ve used the multi purpose blade for everything. (WD-40 really is the key for cutting aluminum)

                  They sell 14” or 7 1/4” blades. Probably just put 7 1/4” on your existing circular saw and get-r-done😀
                  You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    If, I was to make that cut with what have for tools I have,,,I would put one my Milwaukee Saws all rescue blades in my saws-all, make the cut, then clean up the cut with my table saw and/or milling machine.



                    _____________________________________________

                    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                    Oregon Coast

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Thanks to everybody for all the suggestions. I am off to Scranton for a few days so I won't be able to report on which technique I chose, and the resulting success/failure for a few days, but I appreciate all of the input.

                      I may try the "skil saw" with carbide inserts... I have a brand new Horrible Fright circular saw that I bought recently, so I might give that a try. Fortunately I can cut it a bit long and then trim to length with the Bridgeport.

                      Thanks again.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by AZHTR View Post
                        Anyone here heard of the Evolution Saw? I don’t have room for a horizontal bandsaw, so I did some research on these and bought one. Absolutely love it! They sell blades for aluminum, stainless and multi-purpose blades. I’ve used the multi purpose blade for everything. (WD-40 really is the key for cutting aluminum)

                        They sell 14” or 7 1/4” blades. Probably just put 7 1/4” on your existing circular saw and get-r-done😀
                        Yes. The chop saw is light duty, easy to smoke. The steel blade is way better than the multicutter. With the multicutter, it just chatters away on 2x2x1/4 angle iron. It stands no chance at a 2" flat either. But with the steel blade, it sings right through both. I've used the multicutter on my circ saw with good success. I haven't tried the steel blade yet, but I have high hopes for it.

                        You will need adapters to convert the 25mm hole to 5/8". My saw is a diamond design, so I made another washer to fit over the diamond so it wouldn't be gripping on such poor points of contact.
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by JRouche View Post

                          Haha. I dont know who Tony is but it sounds entertaining...
                          Tony is the proprietor of a YouTube channel called "This Old Tony". He does home shop videos. Educational and often very entertaining. Worth a look.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I didn't read all of the above, but generally is seems to be circular saw or table saw, which is an inverted circular saw. These will work and I may very well do this cut with them.

                            But another option I have is to mount one of my jig saws on my router table (I built my router table to take either the router or the jig saw) and cut it there. That would be slower, but also easier to control and therefore safer. Ditto on using WD-40 for a cutting fluid.

                            I have also used a radial arm saw for cutting aluminum. The modern ones have a drag feature that prevents the blade from digging in and jamming. And the blade forces the material being cut against the rear fence so it can't go flying.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by mickeyf View Post

                              Sure, if you just throw it on the table and start cutting. People who use table saws much know how to avoid this. Support the far end, use a Miter gauge with a long fence added or better, a sled that uses both Miter gauge slots and that you can even clamp the work piece to. But sure, if you like, cut it with a Skill saw and square it up on the mill, do 2 operations rather than one. Depends on what tools you have available, how much work you want to do, how precise you need it, etc., etc.

                              You are very correct.
                              I did have a crew of talent. I learned from them. JR

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Just to help TMB, a jig saw on a cut this long and thick would be miserable, even with a really coarse blade. I'd rather use a sawzall over a jig saw

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X