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Had a small flood happen in my shop. It could have been worse.

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  • Had a small flood happen in my shop. It could have been worse.

    My plumbing took a break, sprung a leak on my lathe, Pics to follow.. It could hve been much worse.

    Its a 1" line, right from the meter. 140PSI is what is was after the regulator. Yes, the redularor was toast. It was 22 years old. Dont ever stuff 140 psi into your house!! Your insurance company will shue as heck put a pressure gauge on the system after the fact. A water flood in the shop is a problem.

    Its hard enough to try and keep the stuff from rusting. Now spra it down with water.. Puur SB lathe..

    Ckeck your water pressure regulatorsd peeps.. JR

    Starts
    11-08-2021
    Ends
    11-09-2021

  • #2
    JR,

    I lived in Cairo for 5 years, i had a small workshop in a semi underground garage partly under the house. In a moment of wisdom, the local municipality thought that backflushing the sewage system would be a great way to clear a blockage. It did - straight into my workshop. About 2 feet of fetid liquid. Took ages to clean, and I still have a pressure gauge with a brown tide mark on the inside.

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

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    • #3
      And naturally, the city took no responsibility for the damage either. Right?
      Southwest Utah

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      • #4
        Pressure regulator? Heck pressure here is 110 psi and no regulator required by code, apparently. I measured it after the 30 year old water heater basically exploded.

        City demanded an expansion tank when it was replaced, but the inspector never said a word about the balance pressure it was inflated to.

        It's only double what it ought to be, what the heck.....
        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #5
          Aren't most dishwasher, washing machines and ice makers made to run at like 60 psi? A friend of mine moved into a new home and was complaining about the noise his washer machine and dishwasher was making when the valves opened/closed. I listened and it sounded like the valves were slamming open and closed. I told him to check the water pressure and sure enough it was over 120psi. He installed a regulator and turned it down to 60-70 psi and the loud sounds diminished.
          I'm on a well with the pressure switch set to turn the pump on on at 30 psi and the it goes off at 60psi. We've lived here 46 and have never had a problem with appliances running at that pressure.

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          • #6
            Eh, my basement shop gets from damp to 6 inches in a good rain. The street sewer leaks and pressurizes my foundation so every crack is a fountain. I just never leave anything valuable on the floor. At least the street flooding during Sandy didn't get here and really fill it up. That would have truly sucked, and was my nightmare. It stopped a few blocks away.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              Originally posted by barracudajoe View Post
              Aren't most dishwasher, washing machines and ice makers made to run at like 60 psi? A friend of mine moved into a new home and was complaining about the noise his washer machine and dishwasher was making when the valves opened/closed. I listened and it sounded like the valves were slamming open and closed. I told him to check the water pressure and sure enough it was over 120psi. He installed a regulator and turned it down to 60-70 psi and the loud sounds diminished.
              I'm on a well with the pressure switch set to turn the pump on on at 30 psi and the it goes off at 60psi. We've lived here 46 and have never had a problem with appliances running at that pressure.
              yeah, I could put one in, but I kind of like the higher pressure for a number of things. We have good old steel pipe, suitable for more than that. I just had a leaky pipe fixed, but that was a "never installed correctly" issue, nothing to do with pressure.

              City here is very fussy about "qualified plumbers" doing the work. Otherwise I'd have fixed the pipe myself.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                My plumbing took a break, sprung a leak on my lathe, Pics to follow.. It could hve been much worse. ...
                Uh oh ... sprung leaks usually involve a spray and spray is the worst for machines. I think about a gallon of WD40 is called for. Even where machines haven't been sprayed upon, the excessive moisture in the air can wreak havoc.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                  Eh, my basement shop gets from damp to 6 inches in a good rain. The street sewer leaks and pressurizes my foundation so every crack is a fountain. I just never leave anything valuable on the floor. At least the street flooding during Sandy didn't get here and really fill it up. That would have truly sucked, and was my nightmare. It stopped a few blocks away.
                  How'd you fare a couple months back? Friend of mine whose house in Queens was spared by Sandy had the basement fill up in the sudden overnight deluge this season. Only just now finishing up with the repairs.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by thin-woodsman View Post

                    How'd you fare a couple months back? Friend of mine whose house in Queens was spared by Sandy had the basement fill up in the sudden overnight deluge this season. Only just now finishing up with the repairs.
                    Got real wet but didn't lose anything or suffer damage. Not my 1st rodeo....or boat show? Queens got hit hard in places that never flooded before, another HSM member there who always needled me about my flooding got 4' of water in his basement costing well over $10k in utilities damage and incalculable loss of legacy property stored there. Had Sandy's street flooding crept a few blocks more to me I'd have been in that boat, or worse, since my shop is in the basement.
                    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                      Uh oh ... sprung leaks usually involve a spray and spray is the worst for machines. I think about a gallon of WD40 is called for. Even where machines haven't been sprayed upon, the excessive moisture in the air can wreak havoc.
                      Yes Sir. Thats exactly what I did. I keep a blanket on my machines when not in use so the blanket sorta saved the entire lathe from getting a bath, still damp though. I also keep most of my machines slathered in some sort of protectant at all times due to the ocean air, its impossible to keep a piece of steel from rusting.

                      I blew the area off with a makita blower then wiped it all down and loaded a spray bottle up with WD. Just drenched it. It will be fine.

                      As a side note it did spur me to clean up my chip tray. It became a landing zone for some tools it seems (everything on the towels. I should stop doing that). All that stuff was drenched along with some change gears wrapped up in n oil soaked towel. At least somewhat cleaner anyway.

                      New lines and regulator in place, good for another 22 years, I hope. JR

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                      • #12
                        Sounds like you got it cleaned up as good as you could (looks like a nice lathe). I had a flood at work the other day too. Filling the coolant tray and got sidetracked........Don't worry, be happy.



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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                          Sounds like you got it cleaned up as good as you could (looks like a nice lathe). I had a flood at work the other day too. Filling the coolant tray and got sidetracked........Don't worry, be happy.


                          Haha!! Thats the spirit.. Sorry to hear bout the lil leak Nice shop!! JR

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