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Gear making in the 60s

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  • BCRider
    replied
    A good and highly entertaining video for any machinehead. Looking down her list of videos I see a few others that I'll be watching over the next week or two. Certainly earned a Subscription from me in return for her efforts.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by Randy View Post
    Fran Blanche is transfering her collection of 16mm industrial and instructional films to video. Here's one on Fellows gear cutting machines. I wonder how CNC has changed these processes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mWD...el=FranBlanche
    Easily burn up an afternoon+ going down that rabbit hole. 😀

    Leave a comment:


  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    What a beautiful film about a USA company on top of the world. The shot of the dual diamonds ,dressing a helical gear profile on the grinding wheel is amazing. What is the sad story of its downfall ? Edwin Dirnbeck
    From my research its the same story, American or British, motorcycles or machine tools, they did not embrace, envision and invest in the future fast enough to keep up with other companies that did. This seems to be the trend when the founders of these firms die off and their vision dies with them.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

    She is an electronics engineer, electric guitar sounds device manufacturer and pretty famous with the Frantone effects pedals. More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frantone_Electronics
    Well, so am I, and I worked in the music biz designing amps, mixers, PA amps, etc. Even some effects stuff. Watched the two vids on the frequency meter, and am the opposite of impressed. The "impedance explanation" about not driving it with an amplifier was way off base. But then, I am an amplifier engineer, and not primarily an effects designer, so I have a different understanding of things.

    Interestingly, some of the best and most interesting effects have been designed by folks who did not know a lot. Not knowing too much is a benefit, because you don't know "it won't work", which frees you to make it work.

    After the idea, though, it's helpful to flip back to knowing things, like how to make it reliable and consistent.

    Anyhow, electronics engineer or not, bad technical info in that one at least... It could have worked fine, at least for relatively small frequency changes.

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Also good to see Fellows gear making machines are still be made today, pretty rare.

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  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Had not run into her stuff before. She seems to be a bit of a hoot.... And depending on what she is talking about, seems to have a good background. Can't decide if that is just being well-read, technical background, or what. Chemical stuff an d physics seem to be areas of knowledge.
    She is an electronics engineer, electric guitar sounds device manufacturer and pretty famous with the Frantone effects pedals. More here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frantone_Electronics

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    What a beautiful film about a USA company on top of the world. The shot of the dual diamonds ,dressing a helical gear profile on the grinding wheel is amazing. What is the sad story of its downfall ? Edwin Dirnbeck
    They live on through Borne and Koch. https://www.bourn-koch.com/new-machi...uring/fellows/
    .
    For the Fellows Gear Shaper Company, the 1920s was a time of growth and product development,
    and the 1940s heralded the design and production of nine new kinds of machines, including in 1947 a
    mammoth rotary gear shaper, the 80,000 pound ten-spindle gear shaper. In 1977 Fellows introduced its
    new series of Hydrostroke machines and in the early 1980s introduced computer numerical control (CNC)
    machines.
    In 1970, the company changed its name to Fellows Corporation. Four years later, Fellows was acquired
    by the Emhart Corporation and in 1987 Fellows was acquired by Goldman Industrial Group. Goldman filed
    for bankruptcy in February 2002. In July 2002, Bourn & Koch, Inc., of Rockford, Illinois, and Star-SU, Inc.
    of Hoffman Estates, Illinois, acquired the gear shaper machine tool manufacturing assets and the gear
    shaper cutting tool manufacturing assets respectively

    Probably more info to be gleaned in the Antique Machinery PM forum. One guy there has several working Fellows Gear Shapers, working for him.
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 11-08-2021, 07:36 PM.

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  • Edwin Dirnbeck
    replied
    What a beautiful film about a USA company on top of the world. The shot of the dual diamonds ,dressing a helical gear profile on the grinding wheel is amazing. What is the sad story of its downfall ? Edwin Dirnbeck

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post
    Thanks for posting this Randy, I love Fran! Will be great to see what she posts.
    Had not run into her stuff before. She seems to be a bit of a hoot.... And depending on what she is talking about, seems to have a good background. Can't decide if that is just being well-read, technical background, or what. Chemical stuff an d physics seem to be areas of knowledge.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter.
    replied
    Originally posted by TGTool View Post
    ME is Model Engineer magazine and MEW is Model Engineers' Workshop, both from mytimemedia in the UK. MEW is up to issue 307 now, so that was a while back.

    I'm not familiar with CES.
    CES is College Engineering Supplies

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasturn
    replied
    Nice... very expensive machines in those days. Only gears I ever made was using wire edm, or wired electrodes and plunge edm. Surface finish does not compare to hobbing machines. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • TGTool
    replied
    ME is Model Engineer magazine and MEW is Model Engineers' Workshop, both from mytimemedia in the UK. MEW is up to issue 307 now, so that was a while back.

    I'm not familiar with CES.

    Leave a comment:


  • ElectronMini
    replied
    Very interesting, just about the time I started to make a living as a machinist in New York.
    Maybe as a related subject I developed lately an interest on building a hobbing machine for fun at home.
    I came across an Australian Model Magazine with an article on building one and mentioned a list of references like:
    Dr. Parks, Giles; describing a lathe attachment.........MEW issue No. 57, page 37.
    Also another reference to the ME and CES magazines.
    Does anyone have a clue on the full names of these magazines? Most probably Australian issues, but my searches did not produce anything worthwhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • vectorwarbirds
    replied
    Thanks for posting this Randy, I love Fran! Will be great to see what she posts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Randy
    started a topic Gear making in the 60s

    Gear making in the 60s

    Fran Blanche is transfering her collection of 16mm industrial and instructional films to video. Here's one on Fellows gear cutting machines. I wonder how CNC has changed these processes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mWD...el=FranBlanche
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