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DRO on a surface grinder?

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  • DRO on a surface grinder?

    At least on the Z, probably on the Y as well? Doesn’t seem to be all that common. Reasons for that?

  • #2
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    At least on the Z, probably on the Y as well? Doesn’t seem to be all that common. Reasons for that?
    Not really necessary. There's not a lot of positional jumping around with most surface grinding work. Stuff like, make this surface X distance from another surface.

    There have been a few times where a readout would be handy like face grinding some step in a small shaft/pin in a harig fixture, but honestly dials are not that bad. If one really needed a better system you could setup an indicator on it to check movement, but IMO the dials on surface grinders are just fine.

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    • #3
      Coriolis drift effect?

      Actually I have also wondered why not.

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      • #4
        Y is most important, something like tenths resolution for wheel height.
        Z is only if you grind to a shoulder, not too often.

        --Doozer
        DZER

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Doozer View Post
          Y is most important, something like tenths resolution for wheel height.
          Z is only if you grind to a shoulder, not too often.

          --Doozer
          Z isn’t wheel height?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

            Z isn’t wheel height?
            Z is almost always universally the spindle axis in the machine tool world. I say almost always as I seem to recall a specific example presented years ago on PM where Z was some other axis on some machine tool, but I can't specifically remember what it was.

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            • #7
              Friend has one on a Harrig he bought used. Someone spent plenty of money buying a very sensitive scale, but offhand I can't say what the resolution is
              I cut it off twice; it's still too short
              Oregon, USA

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

                Z is almost always universally the spindle axis in the machine tool world. I say almost always as I seem to recall a specific example presented years ago on PM where Z was some other axis on some machine tool, but I can't specifically remember what it was.
                So on a lathe, the spindle is Z, and the crosslide would be X?

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                • #9
                  Was at a Tool&Die Shop Auction in 2016,they had 9 Surface Grinders everyone had a Baldor VFD & Acurite DRO,2 sold for there appropriate value and the rest sold for under $500 2 @ $250.The worn out Bridgeport Clone sold for more than new price,Auctions can be a real mixed bag!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                    So on a lathe, the spindle is Z, and the crosslide would be X?
                    Yep.

                    The last shop I worked in had two grinders with DROs. They were both Mitsui grinders and were only used dry. We did a lot of small, intricate stuff in steel and graphite and the DROs were really handy.

                    George
                    Traverse City, MI

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                      So on a lathe, the spindle is Z, and the crosslide would be X?
                      Yup. Rotational axis of the spindle would be c, and the up down of the tool (tool height) is y. You'd never reference those for manual lathes, but those are the correct axis for CNC lathes.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                        Z isn’t wheel height?
                        Interesting. Had me tripped up too. I wasn't aware.

                        So I guess for an HBM your table is Z and X. You head would be Y. Spindle C. Table rotation... B?
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                          Interesting. Had me tripped up too. I wasn't aware.

                          So I guess for an HBM your table is Z and X. You head would be Y. Spindle C. Table rotation... B?
                          Horizontal surface grinders,
                          Horizontal mills,
                          Horizontal boring mills,
                          Horizontal lathes,
                          all the same.
                          They all have the spindle horizontal.
                          Hence the naming convention.


                          Z is always the direction the spindle is pointing
                          no matter what the machine.
                          I have a machine tool design college textbook
                          as thick as a telephone book (remember them)??
                          and it shows the axis very clear.

                          -D
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            Way I learned it, Z is always the spindle no matter what else is going on
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                            • #15
                              On our 5 axis Horizontal Boring Mill really 6 Axis, but only ( any) 5 simultaneous

                              Spindle in/out = Z
                              Headstock Up/D= Y
                              Table In/Out = W
                              Table L/R = X
                              Table Rotate = C
                              Index Head R/T = A

                              Rich

                              Edit, You can see that both W and Z can move the same direction
                              That is like on a Bridgeport- either lowering the quill or raising the knee

                              In our case. the Spindle could move 32 inches, but the Table could move 6 feet.
                              (Mill weighed 80,000 # )
                              Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 11-10-2021, 08:00 PM.
                              Green Bay, WI

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