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  • #31
    WOW, is all I can say...! All of these sound just like me and my shop in one way or the other. The one thing that stands out for me on lots of my projects is I'm a 95% guy, in other wards I get to 95% percent then move on and never seem to get back to the last part. Example is remodeled whole house, refinished the hardwood floors but never put in the shoe molding and sold the house with the materials in the basement. Remodeled the present house and did all the work except for the painting of the walls where patching or trim was changed, still the same way 10 yrs later.

    Got a car restoration that has been in the works for 18yrs and I have now bought paint for it twice since the first paint went bad waiting for me. I'm actually taking the week of Thanksgiving off to prime and finish colour coat the body. Then the attached pieces, doors bonnet, boot, etc. are next. Check back next year and see if I got any further.

    Wife puts up with it for so long, then it goes on her list to do, or I get reminded until it gets completed which I appreciate since I seem to get stalled at the 95% point of the project anyway.

    Great Topic Dan D...!

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

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    • #32
      I bought a Benchmaster mill back maybe 10 years or so. It needed work. I finally finished scraping and re-assembling etc to working usable condition this year. (I DID already have a horizontal with a vertical head, however, so I was not dead in the water).

      I bought a Rivett 608 that was a wreck about the same time. I have the crosslide assy re-scraped now, and I am working on the (very complex) bed at present. Some of that has been due to not having a long enough straightedge to be credible, but even there, I have had a 30" SE for a year or so, and did not immediately start in on the work even so. (Again, I already had a perfectly usable 10" Logan, so I was not without a lathe.)

      But I certainly have not been speedy.

      I started re-scraping a shaper a LONG time ago, and that has been stalled as the other things got in ahead of it. The T&C grinder project has not even gotten to the planning stage, but it is a known and accepted "project". And the portable slideway, which ought to have been a quickie, is started, but not finished.

      Watch out for taking on too much, and do not assume retirement will mean better progress.... It has not!

      2730

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Everything not impossible is compulsory

      Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
        WOW, is all I can say...! All of these sound just like me and my shop in one way or the other. The one thing that stands out for me on lots of my projects is I'm a 95% guy, in other wards I get to 95% percent then move on and never seem to get back to the last part. Example is remodeled whole house, refinished the hardwood floors but never put in the shoe molding and sold the house with the materials in the basement. Remodeled the present house and did all the work except for the painting of the walls where patching or trim was changed, still the same way 10 yrs later.

        Got a car restoration that has been in the works for 18yrs and I have now bought paint for it twice since the first paint went bad waiting for me. I'm actually taking the week of Thanksgiving off to prime and finish colour coat the body. Then the attached pieces, doors bonnet, boot, etc. are next. Check back next year and see if I got any further.

        Wife puts up with it for so long, then it goes on her list to do, or I get reminded until it gets completed which I appreciate since I seem to get stalled at the 95% point of the project anyway.

        Great Topic Dan D...!

        TX
        Mr fixit for the family
        Chris
        Everybody knows you don't finish trim until it's time to list the house.

        Post up a thread about the car. We'll keep you honest and bump it up every couple years to check progress

        I completely gutted our main bathroom to the studs when my son was 3. He turns 9 tomorrow, and according to my wife I still haven't finished it. It still needs some turned marble chair rail corner pieces (that I started making...), A door for the closet, and a proper vanity. I just put a small cheap one in, as I wanted to make a really nice one out of some live edge maple I milled from the large tree in the backyard of my childhood home. The wood is "still drying" out in the shed . I'm also very much a 95% guy.

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        • #34
          I realize this thread is a bit old now - after reading it last week and contemplating a bit about dormant projects, I have one more type of project to add to the list: a project that is an almost lifelong dream - where one realizes that one has outgrown the dream but it is still hard to let go.

          I am a child of the mid '60s to the late '70s. From my early teen years, I have been interested in sports racing cars of the mid '50 to late '60s. Back when the rules stipulated that the sports race cars be street legal (wink, wink). Years before I could drive I fantasized about detuning and making one truly street legal to use as personal transportation. By the time I was a young adult, these obsolete, once disposable cars had begun to become collector vehicles (not the stupid money of today but still out of reach at the time). The Ford GT40 was very high on the list. If I could not afford a real one then I would build a replica. In '85 I came across a ZF 5 spd transaxle out of a Pantera. Paid $750 for it, worth several thousand today. The ZF is one of the more difficult, expensive parts of a mid-engine replica. I figured it would be a 10 yr project. I built a 3 car workshop garage with an underslung crane to be able to lift a body by myself (crane has been mighty useful for many other projects, next week I'll use it to lift my trailer on end to be able to weld on the underside without laying on my back).

          I never got around to building the kit car. That transaxle still sits in a corner of the workshop garage under a workbench. I realize that I will never build the kit car but it is still **hard** to give up the dream (and sell the transaxle).
          Metro Detroit

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          • #35
            Originally posted by aribert View Post
            I realize this thread is a bit old now - after reading it last week and contemplating a bit about dormant projects, I have one more type of project to add to the list: a project that is an almost lifelong dream - where one realizes that one has outgrown the dream but it is still hard to let go.

            I am a child of the mid '60s to the late '70s. From my early teen years, I have been interested in sports racing cars of the mid '50 to late '60s. Back when the rules stipulated that the sports race cars be street legal (wink, wink). Years before I could drive I fantasized about detuning and making one truly street legal to use as personal transportation. By the time I was a young adult, these obsolete, once disposable cars had begun to become collector vehicles (not the stupid money of today but still out of reach at the time). The Ford GT40 was very high on the list. If I could not afford a real one then I would build a replica. In '85 I came across a ZF 5 spd transaxle out of a Pantera. Paid $750 for it, worth several thousand today. The ZF is one of the more difficult, expensive parts of a mid-engine replica. I figured it would be a 10 yr project. I built a 3 car workshop garage with an underslung crane to be able to lift a body by myself (crane has been mighty useful for many other projects, next week I'll use it to lift my trailer on end to be able to weld on the underside without laying on my back).

            I never got around to building the kit car. That transaxle still sits in a corner of the workshop garage under a workbench. I realize that I will never build the kit car but it is still **hard** to give up the dream (and sell the transaxle).
            I have a few of those projects. Setting goals like that is what keeps me moving forward, keeps me learning new skills, and keeps me motivated to finish other things sometimes. My sawmill build is part of a larger project of building a timber frame house/cottage/shop to retire in. I'm going to mill all the timbers, as much as I can from my own property, then build the structure in my backyard instead of on site. When it's time to move, I will disassemble and re erect on site. Lofty goal eh, but it keeps me moving and one the wife is behind 100%.

            If you've totally given up on the dream of building a car you could sell the transaxle to fund another a more attainable project and help seed someone else dream. Perhaps offer some help and collaboration with the new owner. When I bought the 3x6" tubes for my sawmill it was from a guy in his 80's. He had them for over 20 years with the goal of building a mill, but a few years into his retirement realized he was never going to get it done so he just bought a woodmizer. They sat on the ground behind his mill until he finally got sick of them and needed the space so he sold them to me. I've had them now for 3 years but have at least got them one step closer to being a mill than he did . He seemed really happy to know what I planned to use them for, and we chatted for over an hour about various things, while he gave me a tour of his property, showed me his woodmizer, and other projects he was working on. Health problems were slowing him down, and he was really paring down his list at the time.

            Another big long term goal of mine is to build a fully operation 1/2 scale replica of an rc166 Honda GP bike from the 60's. To complete it will require my entire current skillset, and more that I don't have yet. Things like panel beating, frame fabrication, casting, engine building and machining will all be required. I learn new things and acquire/build new tools and capabilities with that end goal in mind all the time. Slowly inching my way forward.

            Will I ever see those two projects to completion, I hope so. I can't predict the future though, but all I can do is keep chipping away at them to get there someday and every now and then when available throw large chunks of time and money at them. I don't know what life would be like without goals and dreams, I've always been this way. I have given up on a few. When I quit racing bikes I really wanted to take up flying, and build my own ultralight plane, as that was a big childhood dream of mine to learn to fly. Well, I can honestly say I don't think I will ever achieve that goal. Even though I dream about it often, I just don't think it's attainable for me. I just don't have the free time and disposable income to pursue it like I thought I once had. Kids also happened at that time too (the reason I quit racing) and most of you know how that goes.......

            Building a cobra kit car was once on my list as well. I lusted after those as a teenager, and always wanted to build one someday.....The closest I ever got was building a scale model kit as a young teen. Every time I see one on the road I smile and relive the dream albeit briefly. Again, time and money killed that dream too. Sadly I'm just not as independently wealthy as my interests would hope for lol.

            I have projects come and go. Interest shift, and motivation wanes, money dries up, other things beg for time. Life gets in the way. It happens. My list used to be much longer, but those two have remained as a lighthouse in the distance. Those 2 projects are like a flowchart made up of many more smaller projects and goals along the way, ultimately reaching the end. I don't know what I'll do when I ever get there. I hope to find out one day though. You only get to live once, so make it interesting.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

              ....If you've totally given up on the dream of building a car you could sell the transaxle to fund another a more attainable project and help seed someone else dream. Perhaps offer some help and collaboration with the new owner. When I bought the 3x6" tubes for my sawmill it was from a guy in his 80's. He had them for over 20 years with the goal of building a mill, but a few years into his retirement realized he was never going to get it done so he just bought a woodmizer......
              When I bought the transaxle, I was 25 yrs old and asked the seller (guessing in his 50s) why he was selling it - he said that with all the other projects he had/planned, he would have to live to 150 yrs old before he was going to get to using the transaxle. I politely nodded my head and thought "sucks to be you". I turn 63 in a few months. I realize selling the transaxle will net me a few thousand $ that could be put to other projects but then that dream is totally dead. Now if a '37 Studebaker Dictator coupe (was real car name) were to become available to me ( or a similar vintage Terraplane coupe or pretty much any mid/late '30s 3/4 or 1 ton long bed P/U or half a dozen other somewhat attainable vehicle projects) I'm pretty sure I would be willing to kill off the GT40 dream.

              BTW, I enjoyed your sawmill pics and somewhat envy your "estate". I married the farmer's daughter and can't get her out of suburbia - I have to drive 10 miles to get to my workshop garage.
              Metro Detroit

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              • #37
                I've been famous for starting and never quite finishing projects, although that seems to have started some time in the mid '70s when I finally settled down with a good steady career job and a handyman special old house on 1 acre, and an active social life revolving around hiking and volleyball and singles organizations. I still have a few items that I designed and built while in High School and College in the late '60s, and I'm amazed that I was able to complete those projects. Perhaps it was because of the structure of going to school as well as summer jobs, and friends who may have appreciated my ingenuity.

                The house I bought in 1977 may have been the start of my tendency to start major projects and then get stuck after some time, when my interests and energy became directed elsewhere. I got a steady girlfriend around that time and eventually she bought a handyman special house and I was her "contractor", but some of the jobs expanded beyond my abilities and the relationship soured after a few years. I found it hard to do much work on my house and I became very active in the Sierra Club and volleyball as well as many projects at work as an electronics engineer. Most of those projects probably took a bit longer to complete than they should have, but there was pressure to "ship it" and I did have others who could work on various aspects to get it done. Yet the VP of that company, who is a fishing buddy of a good friend, described me as being "a brilliant engineer, but he never finishes anything". I have, of course, finished quite a few projects that were needed by customers, although I would often find things to "improve on", especially software.

                I became self-employed in 1989, and worked on many design projects as well as servicing older instruments I had a hand in designing. Meanwhile I had been living in my mother's house and I did not have as much interest (or funds) to do major work on my house(s). After she died in 1996 I moved back to my house(s) in 1999 and did some work on them, and then in 2010 I had a couple of contractors do some major work, like insulation and rough drywall, but the job was still not really finished. It was costing too much and my enthusiasm was lagging, along with orthopedic issues that led to hip replacement in 2013, two spine surgeries, and finally knee replacement in 2017. Meanwhile I also developed an interest in machining and I bought a lathe and milling machine and other tools in 2003, intending to build a novel circuit breaker test set using toroid transformers and water cooled tubular copper bus bars. I actually bought a couple hundred pounds of copper pieces I intended to machine and assemble, but my interest lagged and the materials have remained untouched. I also have an unfinished Stirling engine kit and a partially assembled air engine of my own design. I played around with switched reluctance motors and I rewound a couple single phase motors for three phase. And I had a dream of making an electric motor add-on kit for the rear wheels of a front wheel drive car, but that proved to be too big a project. I did a lot of work on modifications to a couple 5 kW DIY battery pack chargers for EVs, and I received them from some people on DIY Electric Car, but again, it became too big a project and I have not made any more progress on them. I feel bad about letting these people down, but they had written them off anyway.

                After receiving my dire cancer diagnosis about a year ago it was quite a shock, but then I was given a new medication that has me in remission. So I have a new appreciation for life and my DIY Simple VFD project was one way for me to try to get that finished, although lately I feel like it has stalled. I get easily distracted and go on tangents such as finding a way to add Bluetooth or IR control interface. I also got sidelined trying to help someone on the Microchip forum with a simple assembly language PIC project, but that has turned into a debacle. I do tend to drop everything to try and help someone with almost anything, which often turns into a time waster, but I also see it as a learning and teaching experience, and in this case I actually finished a simple bit of code that provides a 10 bit PWM with a look-up table, on an ancient PIC12F508 device.

                Now I hope to get back to making progress on the Simple VFD...
                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                  but then I was given a new medication that has me in remission.
                  Very glad to hear this Paul. Good news indeed.

                  Location: North Central Texas

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                  • #39
                    Well? I thought I was the only one. Glad to know you. JR

                    ""There are a variety of reasons I have many projects on the go in various stages of completion. I AM getting better at knocking them off, but always seem to add more faster than I cross them off.""

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

                      Hey Lew, the border is open now, wanna come up north for a vacation? I'll give you some projects to work on, and a shop to do them in.
                      NO, you can't have him. He is mine. Lew I will give you all the projects you want at my place. You can stay in the beautiful Black Forest of Germany. Man O man you are going to be so happy here! I will give you a list made on a roll of toilet paper. You won't ever find the end.
                      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                      • #41
                        My wife tells me I have multiple personality disorder! She tells me I am five people living in one body! She also tells me I don't get lots of my projects done because I spend too much time planning and trying to get it perfect in my head or on paper before I start. Then when I do start I wonder why I waited so long to do this simple project. She also blames you all on here for me not getting to a lot of my projects because I post about them on here and have to get a consensus of the best way to proceed. As we all know on here that leads to 10 pages of how to do it and why this way won't work or is not the best, bla, bla, bla, Finally I do it and wonder why it didn't take so long. Plan for years and finish it in three days.
                        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                        • #42
                          I'm working on a whole house remodel... I'm wondering if I'll live long enough to finish it! Seems like it takes forever to get to the next phase of the job. Currently working on trim, and base. Speaking of which, I need to get off the computer and get a paintbrush in my hand if I want to make any progress!
                          I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                          Oregon, USA

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