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Georgian bay scoot airboat

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  • #46
    Out of curiosity, what does the brake pedal do on a boat?

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    • #47
      Originally posted by ikdor View Post
      Out of curiosity, what does the brake pedal do on a boat?
      On a scoot there is about a 10" long by 5 or 6" wide hinged plate on the back that swings down to slow you down in the water, it also incorporates a spike that drops down to stop you on the ice.
      You can see it in this pic. The pedal pulls on the top of the spike which drops it and the plate at the same time.

      Cheers,
      Jon

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      • #48
        My friend used something like that as a daily driver. VW engine, two blade prop. His was fully enclosed, home made of course, and he 'drove' it to work across Babine lake every day. High center of gravity for sure- his brother flipped in on the lake one day.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Jon Heron View Post

          On a scoot there is about a 10" long by 5 or 6" wide hinged plate on the back that swings down to slow you down in the water, it also incorporates a spike that drops down to stop you on the ice.
          You can see it in this pic. The pedal pulls on the top of the spike which drops it and the plate at the same time.

          Cheers,
          Jon
          That's pretty cool, thanks.

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          • #50
            I stopped by the the boat building place and took some pics and measurements for the scoot.
            Here is a shot of this guys gas and brake pedal, using cables and pulleys, I am sure I can do better than this...
            Cheers,
            Jon
            Attached Files

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            • #51
              Related kinda funny story to the mechanical tach, Sold a very nice Toyota Corolla to a gal many years ago, car was mechanically sound - nice body and interior and went through it with full timing kit and water pump and check out,,, 5 speed manual

              She just loved it, but after about three months I get a call, she's dealing with a very strange problem, she uses the car to commute and says by the tail end of her journey that it starts smelling really bad, not only that - it's leaking something on her shoe's and it's actually nasty stuff that's ruining them...

              So im on the other end of the phone line --- big pause, then I ask her how her coolant levels been ---- whenever I sell something i make sure people know how to check stuff and keep an eye on it --- im thinking heater core rupture till she says " ive been checking stuff like you said and it has not touched a drop of oil or coolant,,,, and I don't think it's either of those it's something much worse - it smells like B.O."

              Im like "B.O. ?" --- "the only thing I know that smells like B.O. is your gear oil and don't see the correlation on how that could be making it into the cab"

              So tell her to bring it by and drop it off, see the "stains" on the floor mat, sniff and yeah that's 90 wt alright,,, look up in there and can see it's running down the speedo head then dripping off the bend in the cable right above the poor girls shoes, so I immediately am thinking "holy crap it's got a plugged trans vent and it's blown it's speedo seal"

              check the vent and nope it was breathing --- im like WTF I know the level was fine cuz I just changed it before the sale,,,

              long story short is the trans seal was weak, and the "pump action" that was dredging it up to the speedo head? you guessed it --- it was a Archimedes Screw,,, the cable wind just happened to be in the direction that in forward gear it would dredge the nasty fluid up against gravity --- short runs no --- but long commutes was enough to pump it into the speedo head and then cause it to run down the outside of the cable...

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              • #52
                The most fun I have ever had on the water was in an airboat in the Florida Everglades. Mine had a big block Chevy engine and would haul ass across most anything. Crossing open water and then hitting the reeds was always an adventure. You never knew what might be waiting for you in there.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #53
                  I am getting ready to pick up the hull and start fabricating the controls, engine stand, prop cage etc.
                  I sold my conduit benders years ago and am now thinking of how I am going to do a nice job of bending the tubing for the prop cage, similar to this in the pic only I plan on using 3/4" rigid aluminium conduit and bolting it rather then welding.
                  I am thinking either using the tire on my zoomboom or making some bending dies with my 3d printer... I also have a nice hydraulic shop press I thought about making some dies for...
                  Any advice?
                  Cheers,
                  Jon
                  Attached Files

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                  • #54
                    Well the guy building my hull caught the china virus in February which caused some significant delays...
                    He is back at it now and hopes to have it done by the end of this month. 😎
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                    The layup looks great! That is some thick fibreglass!
                    I salvaged some control cables from an outboard motor which I am thinking are going to be significantly better then the cable and pulley setup seen above for the brake and gas pedals? Some machining may be required for this pedal arrangement...
                    I am going to need some pretty big springs for this, I am thinking a farm implement store is the place to look for these things eh?
                    This tubing bender looks like the cats meow for bending up the cage and rudder piping but its cost prohibitive... https://www.princessauto.com/en/tubi...t/PA0008536708
                    Still thinking I could print some dies to use in my shop press for this but I am going to wait till I have the thing in my shop before I go making anything...
                    I made up a nice little stand for the engine, tall enough I can swing a prop from it too. I still havent figured out if I can run this thing sans prop or not...
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                    As always any advice would be appreciated.
                    Cheers,
                    Jon

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                    • #55
                      I'm obviously very late to this party. I wonder though at the need for a certified aircraft engine vs a modified car or motorcycle engine? You obviously want reliability. But converted car or motorcycle engines could provide that with a suitable derating from their redline RPM and running a proper size prop that avoids the need to use full throttle all the time to reach that de-rated RPM.

                      I offer up the derating idea since car and motorcycle engines are not intended to run strongly at a high power cruise for overly long periods like boat or airplane engines. As an example consider how the old flat four VW engines were and still are used in a lot of experimental aircraft. One of those used in a similar manner could be a lot cheaper than a purpose built aircraft engine.

                      Not saying that this is not the right way for you. But curious about why you went with the aircraft engine vs a modified car or bike engine.... Especially when a liquid cooled engine could have been set up with the radiator to flow the warm waste air over the passengers to aid with the chill factor... Do all the other similar style boats use aircraft engines? Any with car or motorcycle options? How much HP do these prop boats need anyway?

                      As for running the engine sans prop? Keep in mind that on an aircraft engine the prop is also the flywheel. Certainly you could run it to see if it starts but you'll need something on the prop mount to act as the additional flywheel. And obviously throttle use and run time would be limited due to RPM and overheating issues with no load and no cooling air other than normal convection....

                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #56
                        Thanks for the advice.
                        I picked up the AC engine because the price and timing were right and according to the guys that build and drive these you cant beat these old Continental and lycoming AC engines for this purpose. Lots of guys run Rotax engines too and I looked at them but according to the scoot folks these old direct drive big bore engines have way more torque then the rotax which is nice when you get stuck in the slush.
                        I have seen some with VW car engines also.
                        For the punt I am making it was recommended to go with a 65HP engine for good performance and the one I got is 85HP so it should go far faster then I will ever want to go anyways...
                        Light weight is important to me too since I will likely be operating it alone quite often and as a fat old man I want it as light and manoeuvrable as possible in the event I get stuck.
                        Cheers,
                        Jon
                        Here is some footage of them in action

                        This little one is very similar to what I am building

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                        • #57
                          If you got it for the right price then that trumps all fer sure! Usually even in bad shape those old air engines don't come cheap as long as they can still be re-built. All my suggestions for options were based on keeping the price lower for you.

                          This is quite a smile of a thread. Like everyone out there I knew about the air boats out of the southern everglades thanks to TV. I had no idea that they were used up in the land of the frozen for those sketchy transitional times for water and ice crossing. So great fun to see the videos!

                          I hope the new boat works out better than you're hoping.

                          I could see the covered cabin being a worthy option for this sort of craft too. A soft or tonneau style so it can be fitted in the cold times and removed in the summer.
                          Last edited by BCRider; 05-05-2022, 02:04 PM.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #58
                            I could see the covered cabin being a worthy option for this sort of craft too. A soft or tonneau style so it can be fitted in the cold times and removed in the summer.
                            Yes that is part of the plan!
                            Cant wait to get it home to start putting it all together.
                            Cheers,
                            Jon

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                            • #59
                              I liked that video, a neat machine.
                              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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