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  • #16
    Originally posted by alanganes View Post
    The engine hoist is the obvious solution but presupposes that you have the floor space to maneuver the thing. Same deal with the medical style lifts though they do require less. My shop is not tiny (not huge either) but it does have a lot of stuff in it. There is no way I could move anything around with either of those style lifts.
    The legs sticking out on the engine hoist can also be an issue depending on what you are picking up and where you want to put it.

    I was had a hard time picking up and moving my mill base with the engine hoist.

    The legs being like that and the pickup point can also be more useful though over an over head crane. Picking something out of an SUV for instance.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by alanganes View Post
      The engine hoist is the obvious solution but presupposes that you have the floor space to maneuver the thing. Same deal with the medical style lifts though they do require less. My shop is not tiny (not huge either) but it does have a lot of stuff in it. There is no way I could move anything around with either of those style lifts.
      The OP states it is in the garage. That typically has more capability to handle a lift that sits on the floor. You can always back a car out if there is a problem.
      2730

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Everything not impossible is compulsory

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      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        The OP states it is in the garage. That typically has more capability to handle a lift that sits on the floor. You can always back a car out if there is a problem.
        I call my shop the garage because technically that’s what it is even if I don’t park the car in there.

        I am tight on space floor wise to the point an engine hoist just isn't worth it.

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        • #19
          Engine hoists DO take up floor space. But you can make a small gantry that is only wide enough to fit over the machines you need it to. That should take half (maybe less) the floor space of an engine hoist, and store easily.

          For that weight, 2 x 6 and 4 x 4 lumber would be fine. with a chain hoist.

          I've been thinking of that for my shop. I've got Unistrut double high channel and a runner, but I am (still) working on a new layout, and don't want to cut metal on a hoist and runner until I know.where stuff is going. I need to figure it out soon, because the Rivett base is down there and needs a place to be when it all gets set up.
          2730

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          Everything not impossible is compulsory

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          • #20
            One of the nice things about the Unistrut and trolly system is it spreads the load over several trusses. Nothing says you can't run a 2x4 from the bottom cord to the top rafter to transfer the load up to the top where it belongs. Bob

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            • #21
              Originally posted by BobH View Post
              One of the nice things about the Unistrut and trolly system is it spreads the load over several trusses. Nothing says you can't run a 2x4 from the bottom cord to the top rafter to transfer the load up to the top where it belongs. Bob
              Or, as suggested, just put the hoist at a junction of truss members. Since the truss members are designed for tension or compression, that will avoid bending, and load the truss as closely to the intended way as possible.
              2730

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Everything not impossible is compulsory

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                Get an engine hoist.

                The 2 x 4 trusses are really not made to support point loads.

                As I recall, those are usually a Fink or Howe truss. If so, and you really have to, then put a 2 x 10 across several, and locate it right at one of the diagonals/verticals joining the crossbar to the rafter.

                But, really, just get an engine hoist.

                I have reinforced trusses by laminating a larger board or plywood over nail plates and always pull from Top Chord.Most ones I’ve done the rafters are strapped with 2x4 for metal roof,so feeding a 2” sling or ratchet strap is no problem.When roof is sheeted it’s more challenging but can be done. Click image for larger version

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                • #23
                  I usually like Amazon but if I wanted the one in the link I would have to pay $144 shipping. In this case I would look locally.
                  Fred Townroe

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                  • #24
                    OP, what are the dimensions of your shop? It would be interesting to see if an entire gantry type crane could be setup using the unistrut?

                    2 or 3 runners going the long distance and then a piece of deep channel for the bridge.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by oxford View Post
                      OP, what are the dimensions of your shop? It would be interesting to see if an entire gantry type crane could be setup using the unistrut?

                      2 or 3 runners going the long distance and then a piece of deep channel for the bridge.
                      Seriously, you'd be better off finding a freestanding bridge crane at auction. Some bring little money because they are build to a custom footprint and height. Consider it a kit of parts.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                        Seriously, you'd be better off finding a freestanding bridge crane at auction. Some bring little money because they are build to a custom footprint and height. Consider it a kit of parts.
                        Really depends on the shop and what’s crammed in there.

                        Im not saying the above it the best option but it could give the best results depending on the situation. Then again it may not.

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                        • #27
                          Lifting is one thing. Moving the lifted item around is another. I see a couple of posts suggesting hanging the hoist from the apex of the trusses with or without bridging a few to spread the load out. That's fine for a simple lift. Or even with a rail for moving along a single line. But if Dunc wants to have a wider range of options then something else would be needed.

                          I love my engine hoist but as mentioned it is clumsy to use on a regular basis. And that's even with shortening the feet by a bit over a foot and covering over the longest extension on the boom to avoid any lapse in memory. But a shop made scaled down version with more like a 3ft square footprint might be nice. it would not tolerate moving a high load very far or fast but once clear of a machine or bench the load could be lowered to a more stable point for moving around the floor. And larger urethane casters would aid with reducing the force needed to move and skip over any small swarf on the floor. For that I might also go with a 12v bumper winch and fit the lift with a battery which sits on a trickle/maintenance charger so it's fully portable. My thinking is that this is a fairly low effort option that would be highly flexible in use. And if designed to suit it could slip into a spot for storage that tucks the feet and boom away into a volume of space already used by something else so there's little or no additional floor space take up.

                          Next up would be a rolling A frame rig sort of like a playground swing frame. But again this would have a lot of access issues even if it an roll over a few spots. Not ideal unless your shop has lots of floor space.

                          For a fixed in position option there's a swinging boom crane. A track on the boom would allow the hoist to move along the boom. Then re-arrange the bench, machines and heavy item storage so you can have all the lifting jobs within the range of motion of the boom. This would put the forces into the floor and wall. That might or might not be wise as far as the load on the wall goes since it's not a pure downward force but rather trying to wrack the wall into tipping into the shop or parallelogram'ing to either side. Some external diagonal bracing might be wise both along the walls and up in the attic to diagonally lock a lot of trusses together to aid with spreading out those forces. Mind you at only 200 lbs for most things it's not a big load... so likely the extras wouldn't be needed. But do keep an eye out for popping drywall screws that indicate things are shifting when moving loads around. Popping screws would be a sign that it's time for an array of diagonal bracing.

                          And finally the most involved but nicest to have, the bridge crane. Provided the shop doesn't have any hanging lights or other stuff to get in the way you could fit some rails along two opposite walls and then make up and install a rolling bridge to span between the rails. It was suggested that you could buy one used. But most shops with such a lift would normally be MUCH bigger than most of our garages. So assuming here that it's a one or two car garage I think it's safe to say that you'd have to make your own because most of the options would be much too big. It's certainly the most involved to make by far.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #28
                            I have lifted three ton with this setup

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                            • #29
                              One of the smartest things I did when I built my shop (20' X 40' in one end of our 40' X 60' barn) was to put an 8" I beam across the width, sitting on triple studs. I fabbed my own trolley and hung a 2-ton electric hoist from it. Used it for years, and it lifted the front of a Chevy 4X4 p/u and a J-D 1010 crawler that we assembled cross-wise then needed to spin it 90 degrees so we could install the tracks and drive it out. The I beam was in place of one 2X10 ceiling joist.

                              Some years later, I installed an electric hoist & beam in the center bay of the barn. That is now where I work on vehicles, tractors, etc, as I can no longer get those things into my shop.

                              A bridge crane would be really nice, I wish I'd have installed one instead of the simple hoist & beam in the center bay.


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