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Springfield lathe video

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    rmcphearson
    Senior Member

  • rmcphearson
    replied
    Wonderfull to see. Thank you for making that video.

    Leave a comment:

  • Michael Edwards
    Senior Member

  • Michael Edwards
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

    -Y'know... when you first said that, I thought you meant the big L-taper nut wrench seen at the end shot. That's what I alluded to- there's a guy on PM (actually his daughter now) that cuts and sells wrenches for the L series spindles.


    Doc.
    Yeah, thats it, from Walter A. At the rate that I use mine it will last 1000 years.

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  • Doc Nickel
    Senior Member

  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post
    Well done. That chuck wrench looks just like the one for my Lodge & Shipley
    -Y'know... when you first said that, I thought you meant the big L-taper nut wrench seen at the end shot. That's what I alluded to- there's a guy on PM (actually his daughter now) that cuts and sells wrenches for the L series spindles.

    The chuck key, I made. The machine came with none, and neither of the new chucks I bought later came with one. And since I don't have a lot of time, but I have more time than money, I made one each for the 10" 3-jaw (square) and the 12" 4-jaw (hex.) They're just mild steel, milled and TIG welded, and I can see maybe wearing them out in several years, but I think they'll last plenty long for what I have into them.

    [...]nice to keep good machines from being melted down.
    -I can just about guarantee that had I not bought it, it almost certainly would have been scrapped. I seem to recall the seller was clearing out the property- his brother's, who had passed away due to cancer. I suspect had I not bought it, it'd have been left behind- easier than paying to have it hauled off- and whoever bought the property (with a nice log cabin) very likely would have junked it.

    And as I understand it, it did already get junked once. Back in the early 70s, I believe, after it very likely got surplused out of a semi-local military base. Probably (lots of supposition here) partially parted out, maybe to keep another machine running, and apparently rebuilt, sort of, by a kind of rebuilder back in the day. Machine tools have of course been rare and sought after up here, as it's so bloody expensive to get them shipped up.

    When I got this thing, three or four hands later, it had a replacement compound (something undersized and likely off some imported machine) a replacement oil pump (some aircraft thing) and an incomplete taper attachment off an entirely different machine.

    Can't say what'll happen to it after I'm gone- I have a few years left, but at the rate things are going, we'll probably have friggin' replicators and transporters by then. Hopefully at least some hipster will collect these things like they do gramophones and glass-plate cameras.

    But it'll certainly last the rest of my life, and hopefully a few beyond.

    Doc.

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  • junkaddict
    Senior Member

  • junkaddict
    replied
    Man, that thing is awesome. What an endeavor.

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  • Tundra Twin Track
    Senior Member

  • Tundra Twin Track
    replied
    Very nice Doc,congrats on a Big Project ,nice to keep good machines from being melted down.I’ve had similar type projects,I usually run out of steam towards the Finish Line,Kudos for staying on course🙂

    Leave a comment:

  • Doc Nickel
    Senior Member

  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post
    What kind of bearings did they use eighty years ago.
    -According to the brochures, they rather proudly used Timkens. They are pressure-oiled, and when I cleaned out the sump (and lord knows when last that was done) I found virtually no debris whatsoever, and none magnetic.

    That chuck wrench looks just like the one for my Lodge & Shipley
    -Probably obtained from the same source. I got it from that fellow on PM that CNC plasma cuts them from AR400 or AR500. Needs a little grinding to fit a little better- his template is likely a slightly different "nut" than mine- but works great and was only, like, forty bucks.

    Every Pakistani machining youtube video Ive watched uses a pointer like that
    -I've learned a lot from those Pakistani videos. I don't have to keep my shop clean, safety glasses are unnecessary, loose flowing clothing is fine, and hammers are perfectly acceptable tools to fine-tune the adjustment of precision machine tools.

    In this case, these tubes, part of a homebrew trailer "walking beam" sort of thing, as I understand it, were not high-accuracy pieces. Each one has about 15-20 thou of slop, and I told the guy I can't control what or where it may warp or distort when he welds it all together. I very much suspect that once it's in place, there may have to be some 'adjustment' with a die grinder and a sanding drum.

    Not exactly a case where I need to get out the Last Word®.

    Doc.

    .

    Leave a comment:

  • BCRider
    Senior Member

  • BCRider
    replied
    Nice job on the restoration. It sounds like it was a labor of love and dedication.

    But clearly you got yourself a great machine for the effort.

    Leave a comment:

  • Michael Edwards
    Senior Member

  • Michael Edwards
    replied
    Well done. That chuck wrench looks just like the one for my Lodge & Shipley

    Leave a comment:

  • plunger
    Senior Member

  • plunger
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post

    -I do, out of expedience. The bore of the pipes were so rough from rust pits, and badly lumpy-egg shaped, that using an actual indicator would have been an exercise in frustration.

    And, I only had about 30 thou to take out of the bore. Just throwing them into a 3 jaw showed the bore is more like 90 thou eccentric to the OD, so I had to use the 4-jaw. The pointer was just to get it close, no way I could have gotten it "spot on" with those bores.

    Doc.
    Every Pakistani machining youtube video Ive watched uses a pointer like that

    Leave a comment:

  • Doc Nickel
    Senior Member

  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    Who centers work like that!?
    -I do, out of expedience. The bore of the pipes were so rough from rust pits, and badly lumpy-egg shaped, that using an actual indicator would have been an exercise in frustration.

    And, I only had about 30 thou to take out of the bore. Just throwing them into a 3 jaw showed the bore is more like 90 thou eccentric to the OD, so I had to use the 4-jaw. The pointer was just to get it close, no way I could have gotten it "spot on" with those bores.

    Doc.

    Leave a comment:

  • Richard P Wilson
    Senior Member

  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by skunkworks View Post
    Who centers work like that!?

    Great job!
    Doc does, obviously! Its a bit more sophisticated than my method which would be to use the tip of the boring bar.

    Leave a comment:

  • skunkworks
    Senior Member

  • skunkworks
    replied
    Who centers work like that!?

    Great job!

    Leave a comment:

  • plunger
    Senior Member

  • plunger
    replied
    Isnt it just wonderful to resurrect something like this. It could have been recycled and landed up in some chinese brake discs but lives to work another fifty years. It must give great pleasure to switch this machine on. Its actually amazing how little manual lathes have changed over the last fifty years. This is so much superior to any new chinese machine of similer dimensions. You are spoilt for old iron in the States etc.

    Leave a comment:

  • Dan Dubeau
    Senior Member

  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Looks great Doc, I hope you get many more years of happy service from it.

    Leave a comment:

  • Doozer
    Senior Member

  • Doozer
    replied
    Those power feed clutch handles look a lot like the Dean Smith and Grace design.

    -D

    Leave a comment:

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